Słupsk

StolpSlupskStolp (Słupsk)Stolp in PommernSłupsk Cityalternative namesSlupsk, PolandStolp (renamed as Słupsk)Stolp-ReittStolp/''Słupsk
Słupsk (Stolp; also known by several alternative names) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship, in northern Poland, with a population of 91,007 inhabitants as of December 2018.wikipedia
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List of cities and towns in Poland

cityList of cities in Polandtown
Słupsk (Stolp; also known by several alternative names) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship, in northern Poland, with a population of 91,007 inhabitants as of December 2018.

Gmina Słupsk

Słupsk
The neighbouring administrative districts (gminas) are Kobylnica and Gmina Słupsk.
Its seat is the town of Słupsk, although the town is not part of the territory of the gmina.

Gmina Kobylnica

Kobylnica
The neighbouring administrative districts (gminas) are Kobylnica and Gmina Słupsk.
Its seat is the village of Kobylnica, which lies approximately 4 km south-west of Słupsk and 107 km west of the regional capital Gdańsk.

List of Pomeranian duchies and dukes

Duke of PomeraniaDukes of PomeraniaDuchy of Stettin
Between 1368 and 1478, it was the residence of the Dukes of Słupsk, until 1474 vassals of the Kingdom of Poland.
In 1227, Stolp came to Pomerelia, Schlawe to Pomerania.

Pomeranian Voivodeship

PomeranianPomeraniaPomorskie
Słupsk (Stolp; also known by several alternative names) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship, in northern Poland, with a population of 91,007 inhabitants as of December 2018.
The western part of the province, around Słupsk, belonged historically to Farther Pomerania, while Pomerelia and the eastern bank of the Vistula belonged to the historical region of Prussia.

Słupsk County

Słupsk
Located near the Baltic Sea and on the Słupia River, the city is the administrative seat of Słupsk County and was until 1999 the capital of Słupsk Voivodeship.
Its administrative seat is the city of Słupsk, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county).

Duchy of Pomerania

PomeraniaPomerania-WolgastPomerania-Stettin
However, several historians stated that the first mention was in two documents dating to 1227, signed by the Pomeranian dukes Wartislaw III and Barnim I and their mothers, confirming the establishment of an abbey in 1224 and donating estates, among them a village "in Stolp minore" or "in parvo Ztolp", respectively, to that abbey.
The Stolp (Słupsk) and Schlawe (Sławno) areas (lands of (Länder) Schlawe-Stolp) were ruled by Ratibor I and his descendants (Ratiboriden branch of the Griffin House of Pomerania) until the Danish occupation and extinction of the Ratiboride branch in 1227.

Pomerania-Stolp

Duchy of Stolpduchy
In 1368 Pomerania-Stolp (Duchy of Słupsk) was split off from Pomerania-Wolgast due to the Partitions of the Duchy of Pomerania.
Centered in Słupsk, it was created from another partition of the Duchy of Pomerania, Pomerania-Wolgast, to satisfy Bogislaw V, Duke of Pomerania in 1368, and existed until 1459, when it was inherited by Eric II of Pomerania-Wolgast.

Ustka

StolpmündePort of Ustka
In 1337, the governors of Słupsk (Stolp) had purchased the village of Stolpmünde (modern Ustka) and then constructed a port there, enabling a maritime economy to develop.
The area at the mouth of the river Słupia (Stolpe) was ceded to the town of Słupsk (Stolp) in 1337 with the purpose of building a fishing harbour and a commercial port there to the Baltic Sea.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
Słupsk (Stolp; also known by several alternative names) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship, in northern Poland, with a population of 91,007 inhabitants as of December 2018.
The biggest impact of the oceanic climate is observed in Świnoujście and Baltic Sea seashore area from Police to Słupsk.

Samborides

SamborideHouse of SobiesławSamborid dynasty
The Griffin dukes lost the area to the Samborides during the following years, and the next surviving documents mentioning the area concern donations made by Samboride Swietopelk II, dating to 1236 (two documents) and 1240.
During the rule of Duke Swiętopełk II, Samboride holdings spread from Słupsk in the west going east across the Vistula River including Żuławy Gdańskie, and in the south bordered the Polish dukedoms of Greater Poland and Kuyavia, the Noteć river being the border.

Bogislaw VIII, Duke of Pomerania

Bogislaw VIIIBogislav VIIIBogislaus VIII of Pomerania-Stolp
The succeeding dukes were also vassals of the Kings of Poland: Wartislaw VII paid homage in 1390 (to King Władysław II Jagiełło), Bogislaw VIII paid homage in 1410 (also to King Władysław II).
Upon the partition of the Duchy of Pomerania in 1368/72, his father received the eastern lands around Stolp (now Słupsk).

Słupsk Voivodeship

SłupskSlupsk
Located near the Baltic Sea and on the Słupia River, the city is the administrative seat of Słupsk County and was until 1999 the capital of Słupsk Voivodeship.
Its capital city was Słupsk.

Viktoria Stolp

The football club Viktoria Stolp was formed in 1901.
Viktoria Stolp was a German association football club formed in 1909, from the city of Stolp, Pomerania which was at the time part of Germany and is today Słupsk, Poland.

Swienca family

SwenzonesSwiencaPeter Swienca
After Mestwin II's death the city was reintegrated with Poland and remained Polish until 1307, when the Margraviate of Brandenburg took over, while leaving local rule in the hands of the Swenzones dynasty, whose members were castellans in Słupsk.
In the Lands of Sławno (Schlawe) and Słupsk (Stolp), the region in Farther Pomerania between river Unieść (Nestbach) in the West and the river Łeba (Leba) in the East, the border to Pomerelia, they ruled de facto autonomously under various dynasties until finally the sons of Wartislaw IV of Pomerania-Wolgast of the House of Pomerania made use of their rights as legal sovereigns of the Lands of Schlawe and Stolp and limited the power of the Swienca family considerably.

Recovered Territories

Area recoveredformer German territoriesgranted
After World War II the city was assigned to Poland as part of the recovered territories.
The easternmost part of later Western Pomerania (including the city of Słupsk) in the 13th century was part of Eastern Pomerania, which was re-integrated with Poland, and later on, in the 14th and 15th centuries formed a duchy, which rulers were vassals of Jagiellon-ruled Poland.

Province of Pomerania (1815–1945)

Province of PomeraniaPomeraniaPrussian Province of Pomerania
In 1815 Słupsk became one of the cities of the Province of Pomerania (1815–1945), in which it remained until 1945.
Other railways followed: Stettin–Köslin (1859), Angermünde–Stralsund and Züssow–Wolgast (1863), Stettin–Stolp (1869), and a connection with Danzig (1870).

Province of Pomerania (1653–1815)

Province of PomeraniaPomeraniaBrandenburgian Pomerania
In 1815 it was incorporated into the newly formed Prussian Province of Pomerania.
Furthermore, there were the ducal domains ("Amt") Kolbatz, Friedrichswalde, Marienfließ, Treptow, Stolp and Rügenwalde, and the towns of Pyritz, Stargard, Treptow an der Rega, Greifenberg, Belgard, Neustettin, Schlawe, Stolp, Rügenwalde, Kolberg and Köslin.

Robert Biedroń

Robert Biedron
In 2014, Słupsk elected Poland's first openly gay mayor, Robert Biedroń.
Robert Biedroń (born 13 April1976 in Rymanów) is a Polish politician, former mayor of Słupsk and LGBT activist.

Pomerania

PomorzePommernPomeranian
After the war, according to the preliminary agreements of the conferences of Yalta and Potsdam, the German territories east of the Oder-Neisse line — most of Pomerania, Silesia and East Prussia — were transferred to Poland and from the middle of 1945 through to 1946 the surviving Germans were expelled.
The bulk of Farther Pomerania is included within the modern West Pomeranian Voivodeship, but its easternmost parts (the Słupsk area) now constitute the northwest of Pomeranian Voivodeship.

Koszalin

Köslin40 – KoszalinKoslin
After the major state border changes (modern Vorpommern and Stettin joined the Prussian state after a conflict with Sweden) Stolp was only an administrative centre of the Kreis (district) within the Regierungsbezirk of Köslin (Koszalin). The Słupsk Special Economic Zone is not entirely contained within the city limits: a portion of it lies within Gmina Słupsk, while some smaller areas are at quite a distance from Słupsk (Debrzno), or even in another voivodeship (Koszalin, Szczecinek, Wałcz).
The railroad from Stettin (Szczecin) through "Cöslin" and Stolp (Słupsk) to Danzig (Gdańsk) was constructed from 1858-78.

Szczecinek

NeustettinNeu-Stettin
The Słupsk Special Economic Zone is not entirely contained within the city limits: a portion of it lies within Gmina Słupsk, while some smaller areas are at quite a distance from Słupsk (Debrzno), or even in another voivodeship (Koszalin, Szczecinek, Wałcz).
It is an important railroad junction, located along the main Poznań - Kolobrzeg line, which crosses less important lines to Chojnice and Słupsk.

Przemysł II

Przemysł II of PolandPrzemysl IIPrzemysł II of Greater Poland
Mestwin II accepted them as his superiors in 1269, confirmed in 1273, but later on, in 1282, Mestwin II and Polish Duke Przemysł II signed the Treaty of Kępno, which transferred the suzerainty over Gdańsk Pomerania including Słupsk to Przemysł II.
Some months later, on 23 November in the city of Słupsk a meeting took place between Przemysł II, Mestwin II of Pomerelia and Bogislaw IV of Pomerania.

Slovincian language

SlovincianSlovincians
Slovincian is the language formerly spoken by the Slovincians (Słowińcë, Słowińcy, Slowinzen, Lebakaschuben), a West Slavic tribe living between lakes Gardno and Łebsko near Słupsk in Pomerania.

Gdańsk

DanzigGdanskDanzig (Gdańsk)
In the 12th century, the town became one of the most important castellanies in Pomerania alongside Gdańsk and Świecie.