Sacagawea

SacajaweaSakakaweaSacajeweaSacageweaSakagawea
Sacagawea (also Sakakawea or Sacajawea; May 1788 – December 20, 1812 or April 9, 1884) was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who, at age 16, met and helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition in achieving their chartered mission objectives by exploring the Louisiana Territory.wikipedia
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National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame

National Cowgirl Hall of FameCowgirl Hall of FameNational Cowgirl Museum
I n 1977, she was inducted into the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame in Fort Worth, Texas.
Women already in the hall of fame include Georgia O'Keeffe, Sacagawea, Annie Oakley, Dale Evans, Enid Justin, Temple Grandin and Sandra Day O’Connor.

Toussaint Charbonneau

Charbonneauher husband
At about age thirteen, Sacagawea was sold into a nonconsensual marriage to Toussaint Charbonneau, a Quebecois trapper living in the village.
He is also known as the captor-husband of Sacagawea.

Jean Baptiste Charbonneau

Jean-Baptiste CharbonneauJean BaptisteCharboneaux
Lewis recorded the birth of Jean Baptiste Charbonneau on February 11, 1805, noting that another of the party's interpreters administered crushed rattlesnake rattles to speed the delivery.
His mother was a Shoshone Indian known as Sacagawea.

Salmon, Idaho

SalmonSalmon †
She was born into the Agaidika (Salmon Eater) or Lemhi Shoshone tribe between Kenney Creek and Agency Creek near Salmon, Idaho, in Lemhi County.
Located in the Lemhi River valley, Salmon is home to the Sacajawea Interpretive Culture and Education Center, which focuses on Lemhi Shoshone culture, as well as the interaction between Sacagawea and other Shoshone and Lewis and Clark.

Cameahwait

Fires Black Gun (Tooite Coon)Sacagawea's brother
They used Sacagawea to interpret and discovered that the tribe's chief, Cameahwait, was her brother.
Cameahwait was the brother of Sacagawea, and a Shoshone chief.

Meriwether Lewis

LewisMerriwether LewisMeriweather Lewis
Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark built Fort Mandan.
When they left Fort Mandan in April 1805 they were accompanied by the 16-year-old Shoshone Indian woman, Sacagawea, the wife of the French-Canadian fur trader, Toussaint Charbonneau.

Otter Woman

He had also bought another young Shoshone, known as Otter Woman, as his wife.
Otter Woman was likely stolen by the Hidatsa and purchased by Toussaint Charbonneau, who is best known as the husband of Sacagawea.

Grace Raymond Hebard

Dr. Grace Raymond Hebard
Interest in Sacajawea peaked and controversy intensified when Dr. Grace Raymond Hebard, professor of political economy at the University of Wyoming in Laramie and an active supporter of the Nineteenth Amendment, campaigned for federal legislation to erect an edifice honoring Sacajawea's death in 1884.
In particular, her conclusion after decades of field research that Sacajawea (participant in the Lewis and Clark Expedition) was buried in Wyoming's Wind River Indian Reservation is called into question.

Lewis and Clark Expedition

Lewis and ClarkLewis & ClarkLewis & Clark Expedition
Sacagawea (also Sakakawea or Sacajawea; May 1788 – December 20, 1812 or April 9, 1884) was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who, at age 16, met and helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition in achieving their chartered mission objectives by exploring the Louisiana Territory.
Here they met a French-Canadian fur trapper named Toussaint Charbonneau, and his young Shoshone wife Sacagawea.

Fort Lisa (North Dakota)

Fort LisaFort Manuel Lisa Trading Postused the area
An 1811 journal entry made by Henry Brackenridge, a fur dealer at Fort Manuel Lisa Trading Post on the Missouri River, stated that, both, Sacagawea and Charbonneau were living at the fort.
This fort was likely where Sacagawea died; she had been the guide for the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

Hidatsa

Hidatsa peopleMinnetareeMinitari
In 1800, when she was about twelve years old, she and several other girls were kidnapped by a group of Hidatsa in a battle that resulted in the deaths of several Shoshone: four men, four women, and several boys. Sakakawea is the official spelling of her name according to the Three Affiliated Tribes, which include the Hidatsa, and is widely used throughout North Dakota (where she is considered a state heroine), notably in the naming of Lake Sakakawea, the extensive reservoir of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River.
In 1800, a group of Hidatsa abducted Sacagawea and several other girls in a battle that resulted in death among the Shoshone (Maabúgsharuxbaaga) ("Snake People") of four men, four women and several boys.

Sacagawea dollar

Native American dollarSacagaweadollar coin
The spelling Sacagawea was established in 1910 as the proper usage in government documents by the United States Bureau of American Ethnology, and is the spelling adopted by the United States Mint for use with the dollar coin, as well as the United States Board on Geographic Names and the U.S. National Park Service.
The Statue of Liberty was originally proposed as the design subject, but Sacagawea, the Shoshone guide of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, was eventually chosen.

National Women's Hall of Fame

National Women’s Hall of FameWomen's Hall of FameWomen’s Hall of Fame
She was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 2003.

William Clark

ClarkCaptain William ClarkWilliam Clark (explorer)
Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark built Fort Mandan.
Clark also served as a guardian to Jean Baptiste Charbonneau, the son of Sacagawea and Toussaint Charbonneau.

Hall of Great Westerners

In 1959, she was inducted into the Hall of Great Westerners of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

The Dinner Party

Dinner PartyJudy Chicago's 'Dinner Party
The artwork The Dinner Party by feminist artist Judy Chicago features a place setting for Sacagawea in Wing Three of the installation, titled American Revolution to the Women's Revolution.
Sacajawea, Sojourner Truth, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Empress Theodora of Byzantium, Virginia Woolf, Susan B. Anthony, and Georgia O'Keeffe are among the symbolic guests.

Lemhi Shoshone

LemhiAgaidekaSalmon Eaters
She was born into the Agaidika (Salmon Eater) or Lemhi Shoshone tribe between Kenney Creek and Agency Creek near Salmon, Idaho, in Lemhi County. Sacagawea (also Sakakawea or Sacajawea; May 1788 – December 20, 1812 or April 9, 1884) was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who, at age 16, met and helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition in achieving their chartered mission objectives by exploring the Louisiana Territory.
*Sacagawea

Shoshone

ShoshoniShoshone peopleShoshone Indians
She was born into the Agaidika (Salmon Eater) or Lemhi Shoshone tribe between Kenney Creek and Agency Creek near Salmon, Idaho, in Lemhi County.

Wind River Indian Reservation

Wind River ReservationWind RiverArapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming
Eventually, she found her way back to the Lemhi Shoshone at the Wind River Indian Reservation, where she was recorded as "Bazil's mother".
Sacagawea, a woman guide with the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804-1806, was later interred here.

Eva Emery Dye

Dye, Eva Emery
This use became more widespread with the publication of the 1902 novel The Conquest: The True Story of Lewis and Clark, written by Eva Emery Dye.
Her best known work, The Conquest: The True Story of Lewis & Clark (1902), is notable for being the first to present Sacagawea as a historically significant character in her own right.

Sacagawea River

The corps commanders, who praised her quick action, named the Sacagawea River in her honor on May 20, 1805.
The river was explored during the Lewis and Clark Expedition and named after their guide, Sacagawea.

Hidatsa language

HidatsahidTheir language
A long-running controversy has surrounded the correct spelling, pronunciation, and etymology of the woman's name; however, linguists working on Hidatsa since the 1870s have always considered the name's Hidatsa etymology essentially indisputable.
Linguists working on Hidatsa since the 1870s have considered the name of Sacagawea, a guide and interpreter on the Lewis and Clark Expedition, to be of Hidatsa origin.

Fort Clatsop

Fort Clatsop National Memorial
In January, when a whale's carcass washed up onto the beach south of Fort Clatsop, Sacagawea insisted on her right to go see this "monstrous fish."
The group decided to vote on the matter, with everyone, including the young Native American female Sacagawea and African American slave York, participating.

Lake Sakakawea

Sakakawea is the official spelling of her name according to the Three Affiliated Tribes, which include the Hidatsa, and is widely used throughout North Dakota (where she is considered a state heroine), notably in the naming of Lake Sakakawea, the extensive reservoir of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River.
Named for the Shoshone-Hidatsa woman Sakakawea, it is the largest man-made lake located entirely within the State of North Dakota, the second largest in the United States by area after Lake Oahe, and the third largest in the United States by volume, after Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

North Dakota

NDNorthState of North Dakota
Sakakawea is the official spelling of her name according to the Three Affiliated Tribes, which include the Hidatsa, and is widely used throughout North Dakota (where she is considered a state heroine), notably in the naming of Lake Sakakawea, the extensive reservoir of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River. Sacagawea traveled with the expedition thousands of miles from North Dakota to the Pacific Ocean.