Sadie Thompson

19281928 film versionthe 1928 Gloria Swanson film
Sadie Thompson is a 1928 American silent drama film that tells the story of a "fallen woman" who comes to Pago Pago on the island of Tutuila to start a new life, but encounters a zealous missionary who wants to force her back to her former life in San Francisco.wikipedia
114 Related Articles

Gloria Swanson

Crown Theatre with Gloria SwansonGloriaGloria Le Bailly de La Falaise
The film stars Gloria Swanson, Lionel Barrymore, and Raoul Walsh, and was one of Swanson's better known silent films.
She also produced her own films, including Sadie Thompson and The Love of Sunya. In 1929, Swanson transitioned to talkies with The Trespasser. Personal problems and changing tastes saw her popularity wane during the 1930s when she moved into theater, and later television.

Will Stanton (actor)

Will Stanton
Will Stanton as Quartermaster Bates
He would debut in a feature film with a small role in Raoul Walsh's 1928 silent film, Sadie Thompson, starring Gloria Swanson, Lionel Barrymore, and Walsh.

Charles Willis Lane

Charles Lane
Charles Willis Lane as Dr. Angus McPhail
Two of his best-known roles are Dr. Lanyon in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920) and Dr. Angus McPhail in Sadie Thompson (1928).

James Marcus (American actor)

James MarcusJames A. Marcus
James A. Marcus as Joe Horn
Marcus' most notable films include Regeneration, Oliver Twist and Sadie Thompson.

Blanche Friderici

At the same time, 'moralists' arrive, including Mr. and Mrs. Davidson (Lionel Barrymore and Blanche Friderici).
Sadie Thompson (1928) - Mrs. Alfred Davidson

Jeanne Eagels

stage and silent-screen actress
The film was based on the short story "Rain" by W. Somerset Maugham and the 1922 play that was based on the book by John Colton and Clemence Randolph, starring Jeanne Eagels.
Eagels played her favorite role, that of Sadie Thompson, a free-wheeling and free-loving spirit who confronts a fire-and-brimstone preacher on a South Pacific island.

Raoul Walsh

Walsh
The film stars Gloria Swanson, Lionel Barrymore, and Raoul Walsh, and was one of Swanson's better known silent films.
In Sadie Thompson (1928), starring Gloria Swanson as a prostitute seeking a new life in Samoa, Walsh starred as Swanson's boyfriend in his first acting role since 1915; he also directed the film.

Lionel Barrymore

Lionel
The film stars Gloria Swanson, Lionel Barrymore, and Raoul Walsh, and was one of Swanson's better known silent films.
On the occasional loan-out, Barrymore had a big success with Gloria Swanson in 1928's Sadie Thompson and the aforementioned Griffith film, Drums of Love.

Pago Pago

PagoPago Pago (AS) Nuuuli Poly TechPago Pago, American Samoa
Sadie Thompson is a 1928 American silent drama film that tells the story of a "fallen woman" who comes to Pago Pago on the island of Tutuila to start a new life, but encounters a zealous missionary who wants to force her back to her former life in San Francisco.
Rain (1921) by W. Somerset Maugham is set in Pago Pago. Movie adaptions include Sadie Thompson (1928), Rain (1932), and Miss Sadie Thompson (1953).

Rain (short story)

RainMiss Thompsona short story by W. Somerset Maugham
The film was based on the short story "Rain" by W. Somerset Maugham and the 1922 play that was based on the book by John Colton and Clemence Randolph, starring Jeanne Eagels.
Sadie Thompson (1928), a silent film starring Gloria Swanson.

W. Somerset Maugham

Somerset MaughamMaughamWilliam Somerset Maugham
The film was based on the short story "Rain" by W. Somerset Maugham and the 1922 play that was based on the book by John Colton and Clemence Randolph, starring Jeanne Eagels.
Sadie Thompson (1928), a silent movie starring Gloria Swanson and Lionel Barrymore. Based on the short story "Miss Thompson", which was later retitled "Rain".

Academy Award for Best Cinematography

Best CinematographyBest Cinematography, Black-and-WhiteBest Cinematography, Color
Swanson was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, and George Barnes for Best Cinematography at the 1st Academy Awards for this film, The Devil Dancer and The Magic Flame.
The Right to Love (1930) is incomplete, and Sadie Thompson (1927) is incomplete and partially reconstructed with stills.

Academy Award for Best Actress

Best ActressBest Actress in a Leading RoleAcademy Award
Swanson was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, and George Barnes for Best Cinematography at the 1st Academy Awards for this film, The Devil Dancer and The Magic Flame.

Oliver T. Marsh

Oliver Marsh
Doros used the original title sequences, still photos and footage from the 1932 adaptation (which cinematographer Oliver T. Marsh also shot) to substitute for the lost footage.
Some of the more notable productions he was involved with are: Sadie Thompson (1928), Rain (1932), The Merry Widow (1934), David Copperfield (1935), A Tale of Two Cities (1935), The Great Ziegfeld (1936), San Francisco (1936) and Another Thin Man (1939).

The Devil Dancer

Swanson was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, and George Barnes for Best Cinematography at the 1st Academy Awards for this film, The Devil Dancer and The Magic Flame.
For his work on this film, The Magic Flame and Sadie Thompson, cinematographer George Barnes was nominated for the first-ever Academy Award for Best Cinematography at the 1st Academy Awards ceremony in 1929.

George Barnes (cinematographer)

George BarnesGeorge S. Barnes
A week into shooting, Sam Goldwyn called cameraman George Barnes away.
1928 Sadie Thompson - Raoul Walsh

The Magic Flame

Swanson was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, and George Barnes for Best Cinematography at the 1st Academy Awards for this film, The Devil Dancer and The Magic Flame.
George Barnes was nominated at the 1st Academy Awards for Best Cinematography for his work in The Magic Flame, The Devil Dancer, and Sadie Thompson.

The Love of Sunya

In 1927, Swanson released her first independent film for United Artists, The Love of Sunya which was filmed on her terms in New York City and was the opening night film of the Roxy Theatre.
Swanson agreed but ended up filming the more controversial Sadie Thompson (1928) instead which became her most successful independent production.

Queen Kelly

This was the first time Swanson had heard the name of Joseph P. Kennedy, with whom she would later have an affair and who would finance her next few pictures, including Queen Kelly (1929).
Sadie Thompson (1928)

Rain (1932 film)

Rain19321932 adaptation
Doros used the original title sequences, still photos and footage from the 1932 adaptation (which cinematographer Oliver T. Marsh also shot) to substitute for the lost footage. 1932 - as Rain, starring Joan Crawford, Walter Huston, Guy Kibbee and Beulah Bondi; adapted by Maxwell Anderson, directed by Lewis Milestone.
Other movie versions of the story include: a 1928 silent film titled Sadie Thompson starring Gloria Swanson, and the heavily sanitized Miss Sadie Thompson (1953), which starred Rita Hayworth.

Joan Crawford

CrawfordJoanLucille LeSueur
1932 - as Rain, starring Joan Crawford, Walter Huston, Guy Kibbee and Beulah Bondi; adapted by Maxwell Anderson, directed by Lewis Milestone.
Actress Jeanne Eagels played the role on stage, and Gloria Swanson had originated the part on screen in the 1928 film version.

The Trespasser (1929 film)

The TrespasserThe Trespasser'' (1929 film)
In fact, it was one of her last financially successful films, along with the talkies The Trespasser and Sunset Blvd.
The Trespasser was an important film for Swanson, following the disastrous Queen Kelly (1929) and the hit Sadie Thompson (1928).

Miss Sadie Thompson

1953 - as Miss Sadie Thompson, starring Rita Hayworth, José Ferrer, Aldo Ray and Charles Bronson; adapted by Harry Kleiner, directed by Curtis Bernhardt. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song (for Lester Lee and Ned Washington's "Sadie Thompson's Song (Blue Pacific Blues)").
Other film versions include Sadie Thompson (1928) starring Gloria Swanson, Rain (1932) starring Joan Crawford, and Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A., a 1946 race film.

Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A.

1946 - as Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A., starring Francine Everett and Don Wilson, adapted by True T. Thompson, directed by Spencer Williams
Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A. is an unauthorized adaptation of the W. Somerset Maugham story "Rain", which had been adapted as the John Colton-Clemence Randolph play Rain. The property had been filmed twice before this version: as the 1928 Sadie Thompson starring Gloria Swanson and the 1932 Rain starring Joan Crawford.

1st Academy Awards

1st(1st)first Academy Awards
Swanson was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, and George Barnes for Best Cinematography at the 1st Academy Awards for this film, The Devil Dancer and The Magic Flame.