Saint

saintssainthoodAll SaintsChristian saintCatholic saintSt.Christian saintsCult of SaintsRoman Catholic saintSt
A saint is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.wikipedia
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Folk saint

Saint GlinglinArgentine folk saintfolk
Depending on the religion, saints are recognized either by official ecclesiastical declaration, as in the Catholic faith, or by popular acclamation (see Folk saint).
Folk saints are dead people or other spiritually powerful entities (such as indigenous spirits) venerated as saints, but not officially canonized.

Glorification

glorifiedglorifyAll Saints
In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Oriental Orthodox, and Lutheran doctrine, all of their faithful deceased in Heaven are considered to be saints, but some are considered worthy of greater honor or emulation; official ecclesiastical recognition, and consequently veneration, is given to some saints through the process of canonization in the Catholic Church or glorification in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
From the Catholic canonization to the similar sainthood of the Eastern Orthodox Church to salvation in Christianity in Protestant beliefs, the glorification of the human condition can be a long and arduous process.

Thaumaturgy

Wonderworkerthaumaturgemiracle worker
Thaumaturgy is the capability of a magician or a saint to work magic or miracles.

Heaven

celestialParadiseheavenly kingdom
According to the Catholic Church, a "saint" is anyone in Heaven, whether recognized on Earth or not, who form the "great cloud of witnesses" (Hebrews 12:1).
Heaven, or the heavens, is a common religious, cosmological, or transcendent place where beings such as gods, angels, spirits, saints, or venerated ancestors are said to originate, be enthroned, or live.

Intercession of saints

intercessionintercedeintercessions
Many Protestants consider intercessory prayers to the saints to be idolatry as an application of divine worship that should be given only to God himself is being given to other believers, dead or alive.
The practice of praying through saints can be found in Christian writings from the 3rd century onward.

Ulrich of Augsburg

Saint UlrichSt. UlrichUlrich
On 3 January 993, Pope John XV became the first pope to proclaim a person a "saint" from outside the diocese of Rome: on the petition of the German ruler, he had canonized Bishop Ulrich of Augsburg.
He was the first saint to be canonized not by a local authority but by the Pope.

Rishi

Rishissageṛṣi
While the English word saint originated in Christianity, historians of religion now use the appellation "in a more general way to refer to the state of special holiness that many religions attribute to certain people", with the Jewish tzadik, the Islamic walī, the Hindu rishi or Sikh guru, and the Buddhist arhat or bodhisattva also being referred to as saints.
Post-Vedic tradition regards the Rishis as "sages" or saints, constituting a peculiar class of divine human beings in the early mythical system, as distinct from Asuras, Devas and mortal men.

Walter of Pontoise

Gauthier of Pontoise
Walter of Pontoise was the last person in Western Europe to be canonized by an authority other than the Pope: Hugh de Boves, the Archbishop of Rouen, canonized him in 1153.
1030 – c. 1099) was a French saint of the eleventh century.

Congregation for the Causes of Saints

Pre-Congregationpre-congregational saintCongregation for the Causes of the Saints
Monsignor Robert Sarno, an official of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints of the Holy See, expressed that it is impossible to give an exact number of saints.
The Congregation for the Causes of Saints (Congregatio de Causis Sanctorum) is the congregation of the Roman Curia that oversees the complex process that leads to the canonization of saints, passing through the steps of a declaration of "heroic virtues" and beatification.

Patron saint

patronpatron saintspatroness
A saint may be designated as a patron saint of a particular cause, profession, or locale, or invoked as a protector against specific illnesses or disasters, sometimes by popular custom and sometimes by official declarations of the Church.
A patron saint, patroness saint, patron hallow or heavenly protector is a saint who in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism or Eastern Orthodoxy, is regarded as the heavenly advocate of a nation, place, craft, activity, class, clan, family or person.

Veneration

veneratedvenerateveneration of saints
In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Oriental Orthodox, and Lutheran doctrine, all of their faithful deceased in Heaven are considered to be saints, but some are considered worthy of greater honor or emulation; official ecclesiastical recognition, and consequently veneration, is given to some saints through the process of canonization in the Catholic Church or glorification in the Eastern Orthodox Church. Although the term "worship" is sometimes used, it is only used with the older English connotation of honoring or respecting (dulia) a person.
Veneration (Latin veneratio or dulia, Greek δουλεία, douleia), or veneration of saints, is the act of honoring a saint, a person who has been identified as having a high degree of sanctity or holiness.

Saint symbolism

attributeattributesSaint symbology
Some of the saints have a special symbol by tradition, e.g., Saint Lawrence, deacon and martyr, is identified by a gridiron because he is believed to have been burned to death on one.
Each saint has a story and a reason why they led an exemplary life.

Roman Martyrology

Martyrologium RomanumMartyrologyfeast day
One source claims that "there are over 10,000 named saints and beatified people from history, the Roman Martyrology and Orthodox sources, but no definitive head count".
It provides an extensive but not exhaustive list of the saints recognized by the Church.

Icon

iconsicon paintingreligious icons
Relics of saints are respected, or "venerated", similar to the veneration of holy images and icons.
The most common subjects include Christ, Mary, saints and angels.

Relic

relicsholy relicsholy relic
Relics of saints are respected, or "venerated", similar to the veneration of holy images and icons.
Instead of having to travel to be near to a venerated saint, relics of the saint could be venerated locally.

Anglo-Catholicism

Anglo-CatholicAnglo-CatholicsAnglo Catholic
In high-church contexts, such as Anglo-Catholicism, a saint is generally one to whom has been attributed (and who has generally demonstrated) a high level of holiness and sanctity.
The articles for the most part concurred with the teachings of the Church in England as they had been prior to the Protestant Reformation and defended, among other things, the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist, the sacrament of Confession, the honouring and invocation of Christian saints and prayer for the dead.

Hermit

hermitseremiticeremitical
This is a title attributed to saints who had lived a monastic or eremitic life, and it is equal to the more usual title of "Saint".
Many hermits in that century and the next came to be regarded as saints.

All Saints' Day

All SaintsAll Saints DayAll Saint's Day
Methodist congregations observe All Saints' Day.
All Saints' Day, also known as All Hallows' Day, Hallowmas, the Feast of All Saints, or Solemnity of All Saints, is a Christian festival celebrated in honour of all the saints, known and unknown.

Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern OrthodoxOrthodoxOrthodox Church
In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Oriental Orthodox, and Lutheran doctrine, all of their faithful deceased in Heaven are considered to be saints, but some are considered worthy of greater honor or emulation; official ecclesiastical recognition, and consequently veneration, is given to some saints through the process of canonization in the Catholic Church or glorification in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
All persons currently in heaven are considered to be saints, whether their names are known or not.

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
A saint is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.
Many religious believers allow for the existence of other, less powerful spiritual beings such as angels, saints, jinn, demons, and devas.

Latria

worshipdivine worship
According to the Church, Divine worship is in the strict sense reserved only to God (latria) and never to the Saints.
Catholic and Orthodox Christians offer other degrees of reverence to the Blessed Virgin Mary and to the Saints; these non-sacrificial types of reverence are called hyperdulia and dulia, respectively.

Thirty-nine Articles

Six Articles39 ArticlesThirty-Nine Articles of Religion
So far as invocation of the saints is concerned, one of the Church of England's Articles of Religion "Of Purgatory" condemns "the Romish Doctrine concerning...(the) Invocation of Saints" as "a fond thing vainly invented, and grounded upon no warranty of Scripture, but rather repugnant to the Word of God".
Prayer to Mary, mother of Jesus, and all the other saints was permitted as long as superstition was avoided.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Oriental Orthodox, and Lutheran doctrine, all of their faithful deceased in Heaven are considered to be saints, but some are considered worthy of greater honor or emulation; official ecclesiastical recognition, and consequently veneration, is given to some saints through the process of canonization in the Catholic Church or glorification in the Eastern Orthodox Church. According to the Catholic Church, a "saint" is anyone in Heaven, whether recognized on Earth or not, who form the "great cloud of witnesses" (Hebrews 12:1).
A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognised as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God, while canonization is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognised saints.

Worship

religious worshipdevotionworshipper
Although the term "worship" is sometimes used, it is only used with the older English connotation of honoring or respecting (dulia) a person.

Umbanda

UmbandistsUmbanda BrancaUmbandist
Cuban Santería, Haitian Vodou, Trinidad Orisha-Shango, Brazilian Umbanda, Candomblé, and other similar syncretist religions adopted the Catholic saints, or at least the images of the saints, and applied their own spirits/deities to them.
Other common beliefs are the existence of deities called Orixás, most of them syncretized with Catholic saints that act as divine energy and forces of nature; spirits of deceased people that counsel and guide practitioners through troubles in the material world; psychics, or mediums, who have a natural ability that can be perfected to bring messages from the spiritual world of Orixás and the guiding spirits; reincarnation and spiritual evolution through many material lives (karmic law) and the practice of charity and social fraternity.