Saint Peter's tomb

tomb of Saint PetertombSt. Peter's tombbonesConfessio Petrihis tombJerusalem ossuariesnear Saint PeterNiche of the Palliumsoriginal tomb
Saint Peter's tomb is a site under St. Peter's Basilica that includes several graves and a structure said by Vatican authorities to have been built to memorialize the location of Saint Peter's grave.wikipedia
105 Related Articles

Margherita Guarducci

Guarducci M.
Margherita Guarducci argued that these were the remains of Saint Peter and that they had been moved into a niche in the graffiti wall from the grave under the aedicula "at the time of Constantine, after the peace of the church" (313).
She was the first woman to lead archaeological excavations at the Vatican, succeeding Ludwig Kaas, and completed the excavations on Saint Peter's tomb, discovering relics she asserted were those of Saint Peter.

Saint Peter

PeterSt. PeterSt Peter
Saint Peter's tomb is a site under St. Peter's Basilica that includes several graves and a structure said by Vatican authorities to have been built to memorialize the location of Saint Peter's grave. Following the discovery of bones that had been transferred from a second tomb under the monument, on June 26, 1968, Pope Paul VI claimed that the relics of Saint Peter had been identified in a manner considered convincing.
Catholic tradition holds that Peter's inverted crucifixion occurred in the gardens of Nero, with the burial in Saint Peter's tomb nearby.

St. Peter's Basilica

Saint Peter's BasilicaSt Peter's BasilicaSt. Peter
Saint Peter's tomb is a site under St. Peter's Basilica that includes several graves and a structure said by Vatican authorities to have been built to memorialize the location of Saint Peter's grave. Between 1939 and 1949, the Vatican-led archaeological team overseen by Monsignor Ludwig Kaas, who had overall authority over the project, had uncovered a complex of pagan mausoleums under the foundations of St. Peter's Basilica (the so-called Vatican Necropolis), dating to the 2nd and 3rd centuries.
Saint Peter's tomb is supposedly directly below the high altar of the basilica.

Relic

relicsholy relicsholy relic
Following the discovery of bones that had been transferred from a second tomb under the monument, on June 26, 1968, Pope Paul VI claimed that the relics of Saint Peter had been identified in a manner considered convincing.

Old St. Peter's Basilica

St. Peter's BasilicaOld Saint Peter's BasilicaSt. Peter
The complex was partially torn down and filled with earth to provide a foundation for the building of the first St. Peter's Basilica during the reign of Constantine I in about AD 330.
As a result, the raiders destroyed Saint Peter's tomb and pillaged the holy shrine.

Circus of Nero

Circus NeronisVatican CircusCampo Santo de' Tedeschi
Furthermore, Tertullian says these events took place in the imperial gardens near the Circus of Nero.
The traditional location of Saint Peter's tomb is in this area, in the cemetery mentioned above and on a site suggested by the basilica (see below).

Pope Hyginus

HyginusSt. HyginusHygeinos, Bishop of Rome
Burial near Peter, on Vatican Hill, is attributed to: Pope Linus, Pope Anacletus, Pope Evaristus, Pope Telesphorus, Pope Hyginus, Pope Pius I, Pope Anicetus (later transferred to the Catacomb of Callixtus), Pope Victor I.
At his death he was buried on the Vatican Hill, near Saint Peter's tomb.

Pope Evaristus

EvaristusEvaristus (Aristus)
Burial near Peter, on Vatican Hill, is attributed to: Pope Linus, Pope Anacletus, Pope Evaristus, Pope Telesphorus, Pope Hyginus, Pope Pius I, Pope Anicetus (later transferred to the Catacomb of Callixtus), Pope Victor I.
It is probable that Evaristus was buried near Saint Peter's tomb in the Vatican.

Vatican Necropolis

necropolistwo levels of burial grounds
Between 1939 and 1949, the Vatican-led archaeological team overseen by Monsignor Ludwig Kaas, who had overall authority over the project, had uncovered a complex of pagan mausoleums under the foundations of St. Peter's Basilica (the so-called Vatican Necropolis), dating to the 2nd and 3rd centuries.
Lasting about an hour and a half, the tours end at Saint Peter's tomb before returning to the basilica.

Pope Pius XII

Pius XIIEugenio PacelliCardinal Pacelli
Though many bones have been found at the site of the 2nd-century shrine, as the result of two campaigns of archaeological excavation, Pope Pius XII stated in December 1950 that none could be confirmed to be Saint Peter's with absolute certainty.

Pope Paul VI

Paul VIGiovanni Battista MontiniGiovanni Montini
Following the discovery of bones that had been transferred from a second tomb under the monument, on June 26, 1968, Pope Paul VI claimed that the relics of Saint Peter had been identified in a manner considered convincing.

Aedicula

aediculeediculeaediculae
The grave claimed by the Church to be that of Saint Peter lies at the foot of the aedicula beneath the floor.

Loculus (architecture)

loculiloculusburial niches
In 1953, after the initial archeological efforts had been completed, another set of bones were found that were said to have been removed without the archeologists' knowledge from a niche (loculus) in the north side of a wall (the graffiti wall) that abuts the red wall on the right of the aedicula.

Peace of the Church

Peace of ConstantineConstantine brought peace to the Churchfourth century
Margherita Guarducci argued that these were the remains of Saint Peter and that they had been moved into a niche in the graffiti wall from the grave under the aedicula "at the time of Constantine, after the peace of the church" (313).

Pope Clement I

Clement of RomeSaint ClementClement
The earliest reference to Saint Peter's death is in a letter of Clement, bishop of Rome, to the Corinthians (1 Clement, a.k.a. Letter to the Corinthians, written c. 96 AD).

First Epistle of Clement

1 ClementEpistle of ClementI Clement
The earliest reference to Saint Peter's death is in a letter of Clement, bishop of Rome, to the Corinthians (1 Clement, a.k.a. Letter to the Corinthians, written c. 96 AD).

Eusebius

Eusebius of CaesareaEusebianOnomasticon
The historian Eusebius, a contemporary of Constantine, wrote that Peter "came to Rome, and was crucified with his head downwards," attributing this information to the much earlier theologian Origen, who died c. 254 AD.

Origen

Origen of AlexandriaOrigenismOrigenist
The historian Eusebius, a contemporary of Constantine, wrote that Peter "came to Rome, and was crucified with his head downwards," attributing this information to the much earlier theologian Origen, who died c. 254 AD.

Cross of Saint Peter

inverted crosscrucified upside-downCross of St. Peter
St. Peter's martyrdom is traditionally depicted in religious iconography as crucifixion with his head pointed downward.

Tertullian

Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianusintersection of Athens and JerusalemQ. Septimius Florens Tertullianus
Peter's place and manner of death are also mentioned by Tertullian (c.

Tacitus

Publius Cornelius TacitusCornelius TacitusGaius Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus (56–117) describes the persecution of Christians in his Annals, though he does not specifically mention Peter.