Sakai clan

SakaiSakai uta-no-kami
The Sakai clan was a Japanese samurai clan that claimed descent from the Nitta branch of the Minamoto clan, who were in turn descendants of Emperor Seiwa.wikipedia
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Fudai daimyō

fudaifudai'' domainfudai'' clan
In the Edo period, because of their longstanding service to the Tokugawa clan, the Sakai were classified as a fudai family, in contrast with the tozama ("outsider clans").
Some of these include the Honda, Sakai, Sakakibara, Ii, Itakura, and Mizuno clans.

Sakai Tadatsugu

The senior branch was founded by Sakai Tadatsugu (1527–1596).
The Sakai clan originated in 14th century Mikawa Province, claiming descent from Minamoto Arichika.

Tsuruoka Domain

ShōnaiShōnai DomainShōnai-han
In 1619, he was moved to Matsushiro Domain in Shinano Province; and then, from 1622 to 1868, he was installed at Tsuruoka Domain (120,000 koku) in Dewa Province.
It was governed for the whole of its history by the Sakai clan, which resulted in an unusually stable and prosperous domain.

Takada Domain

TakadaTakada-hanTakata
When Ieyasu's holdings were transferred to the Kantō region in 1590, Ietsugu was installed at Usui Domain (30,000 koku) in Kōzuke Province, but, in 1604, he was moved to Takasaki Domain (50,000 koku). In 1616, he was again moved to Takada Domain (100,000 koku), this time in Echigo Province.
A junior branch of the Sakai clan briefly ruled Takada from 1616 to 1618, followed by Matsudaira Tadamasa from 1619-1623.

Japanese clans

Japanese samurai clanclanJapanese clan
The Sakai clan was a Japanese samurai clan that claimed descent from the Nitta branch of the Minamoto clan, who were in turn descendants of Emperor Seiwa.
Sakai clan - cadet branch of Nitta clan, by the Tokugawa clan descended from Seiwa Genji.

Sakai Tadakiyo

Tadakiyo Sakai
In 1749, the descendants of Sakai Tadakiyo (1626–1681) were transferred to Himeji Domain (150,000 koku) in Harima Province ; and they remained daimyō at Himeji until the Meiji period.
The fudai Sakai clan originated in 14th century Mikawa Province.

Dewa Province

DewaDewa no kuni
In 1619, he was moved to Matsushiro Domain in Shinano Province; and then, from 1622 to 1868, he was installed at Tsuruoka Domain (120,000 koku) in Dewa Province.
During the early Edo period, both the Mogami and the Akita were dispossessed, and their territories broken up into smaller domains, the largest of which were held by the Sakai clan and Uesugi clans.

Nitta clan

Nitta
The Sakai clan was a Japanese samurai clan that claimed descent from the Nitta branch of the Minamoto clan, who were in turn descendants of Emperor Seiwa.

Matsudaira clan

MatsudairaMatsudaira (Hisamatsu) clanMatsudaira (Matsui) clan
Serata (Nitta) Arichika, a samurai of the 14th century, was the common ancestor of both the Sakai clan and the Matsudaira clan, which the Sakai later served.
Sakai clan

Sakai Tadatoshi

Sakai Tadatoshi (1562–1627) received the fief of Tanaka Domain (10,000 koku) in Suruga Province in 1601; then his holding was transferred in 1609 to Kawagoe Domain (30,000 koku) in Musashi province.
He was head of a cadet branch of the Sakai clan.

Tanaka Domain

Tanaka
Sakai Tadatoshi (1562–1627) received the fief of Tanaka Domain (10,000 koku) in Suruga Province in 1601; then his holding was transferred in 1609 to Kawagoe Domain (30,000 koku) in Musashi province.
The Mizuno clan was subsequently replaced by the Matsudaira (Fujii), Hōjō, Nishio, Sakai, Tsuchiya, Ōta, Naitō, and Toki clans until Tanaka Domain finally came under the rule of the Honda clan in 1730.

Obama Domain

ObamaObama-hanthe fief of Obama
Sakai Tadakatsu (1587–1662) was installed in 1634 through 1868 at Obama Domain (103,500 koku) in Wakasa Province.
In 1634, Sakai Tadakatsu, of a cadet branch of the Sakai clan at Kawagoe Domain in Musashi Province, then became daimyō of Obama Domain.

Himeji Domain

HimejiDaimyō'' of HimejiHimeji-han
In 1749, the descendants of Sakai Tadakiyo (1626–1681) were transferred to Himeji Domain (150,000 koku) in Harima Province ; and they remained daimyō at Himeji until the Meiji period.
*Sakai clan (Fudai; 150,000 koku)

Sakai Tadakatsu (Shōnai)

Sakai Tadakatsu
Sakai Tadakatsu (Shōnai) (1594–1647)
The fudai Sakai clan originated in 14th century Mikawa Province.

Maebashi Domain

MaebashiLords of Maebashi
The successive leaders at Maebashi were:
Following the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate, the Hiraiwa were transferred to Kōfu Castle and were replaced by a branch of the Sakai clan, formerly daimyō of Kawagoe Domain.

Tsuruga Domain

Tsuruga
These Sakai were installed in 1682 through 1868 at Tsuruga Domain (10,000 koku) in Echizen Province.
The Tsuruga area became divided mostly between territory controlled by the Sakai clan of neighbouring Obama Domain and tenryō territory controlled directly by the shogunate.

Wakasa Province

WakasaWakasa no kuni
Sakai Tadakatsu (1587–1662) was installed in 1634 through 1868 at Obama Domain (103,500 koku) in Wakasa Province.
The Sakai clan continued to rule Obama for fourteen generations over 237 years to the end of the Edo period.

Minamoto clan

MinamotoGenjiGenji clan
The Sakai clan was a Japanese samurai clan that claimed descent from the Nitta branch of the Minamoto clan, who were in turn descendants of Emperor Seiwa.

Emperor Seiwa

SeiwaJougan EraSeiwa-tennō
The Sakai clan was a Japanese samurai clan that claimed descent from the Nitta branch of the Minamoto clan, who were in turn descendants of Emperor Seiwa.

Sengoku period

Japan (Sengoku period)SengokuWarring States period
In the Sengoku period, under Tokugawa Ieyasu (who was the head of what was formerly the main Matsudaira family line), the Sakai became chief retainers.

Tokugawa Ieyasu

Ieyasu TokugawaIeyasuTokugawa
In the Sengoku period, under Tokugawa Ieyasu (who was the head of what was formerly the main Matsudaira family line), the Sakai became chief retainers. Tadatsugu, a vassal of Tokugawa Ieyasu, was charged with the defense of Yoshida Castle in Mikawa Province.

Edo period

Edo-periodEdoTokugawa
In the Edo period, because of their longstanding service to the Tokugawa clan, the Sakai were classified as a fudai family, in contrast with the tozama ("outsider clans").

Tozama daimyō

tozamaoutside ''daimyōtozama daimyô
In the Edo period, because of their longstanding service to the Tokugawa clan, the Sakai were classified as a fudai family, in contrast with the tozama ("outsider clans").

Mikawa Province

MikawaMikawa no kuni
The fudai Sakai clan originated in 14th century Mikawa Province.

Yoshida Castle (Mikawa Province)

Yoshida Castle
Tadatsugu, a vassal of Tokugawa Ieyasu, was charged with the defense of Yoshida Castle in Mikawa Province.