Sale of the Century (U.S. game show)

Sale of the Century$ale of the Century(Sale of the Century)a US game show of the same nameoriginal run (1969–74) in the US
Sale of the Century (stylized as $ale of the Century) is an American television game show that debuted in the United States on September 29, 1969, on NBC daytime.wikipedia
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Jim Perry (television personality)

Jim Perry
With Jim Perry as its host, the new American Sale of the Century launched on January 3, 1983, and aired until March 24, 1989.
He was the host of the American game shows Card Sharks and $ale of the Century, as well as the Canadian game shows Definition and Headline Hunters.

Temptation (2007 U.S. game show)

TemptationTemptation'' (2007 U.S. game show)
A short-lived revival of the series entitled Temptation, like the recent Australian revival, debuted in syndication on September 10, 2007, following a September 7 preview on MyNetworkTV.
Temptation: The New Sale of the Century is an American syndicated television game show loosely based on both the original Australian and American Sale of the Century versions, plus the 2005 Australian version, also titled Temptation.

Hit Man (U.S. game show)

Hit ManHit Man'' (U.S. game show)US version
Again, it was one of three NBC game shows premiering on the same date, along with Hit Man and Just Men! (which both lasted only 13 weeks), and like its predecessor spawned a syndicated edition.
Hit Man premiered as one of three new game shows on NBC's daytime schedule, along with the new Just Men! and a revival of Sale of the Century, that the network commissioned to replace the cancelled serials Texas and The Doctors.

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
Sale of the Century (stylized as $ale of the Century) is an American television game show that debuted in the United States on September 29, 1969, on NBC daytime.
Notable daytime game shows that once aired on NBC include The Price Is Right (1956–1963), Concentration (1958–1973 and 1987–1991 as Classic Concentration), The Match Game (1962–1969), Let's Make a Deal (1963–1968 and 1990–1991, as well as a short-lived prime-time revival in 2003), Jeopardy! (1964–1975 and 1978–1979), The Hollywood Squares (1966–1980), Wheel of Fortune (1975–1989 and 1991), Password Plus/Super Password (1979–1982 and 1984–1989), Sale of the Century (1969–1973 and 1983–1989) and Scrabble (1984–1990 and 1993).

Reg Grundy

Grundy collectionReginald Roy Grundy
The rights to Sale of the Century were purchased in 1980 by Australian TV mogul Reg Grundy, who turned the show into a success in Australia (see Sale of the Century (Australian game show)) and eventually sold his format of the series to NBC.
Grundy was the first person to sell an Australian drama to America (Prisoner) and the first to sell an Australian quiz show to the UK (Going for Gold). He subsequently started the US-based company Reg Grundy Productions, which produced the 1980s NBC daytime game shows $ale of the Century and Scrabble, as well as Time Machine, Bruce Forsyth's Hot Streak for ABC and Scattergories.

Jay Stewart

Jay Stewart announced until his retirement in January 1988, when he was replaced by Don Morrow.
Other shows for which he announced regularly include the Reg Grundy productions Scrabble and Sale of the Century, as well as the Jack Barry-Dan Enright productions The Joker's Wild, Tic-Tac-Dough and Bullseye.

Press Your Luck

1983 CBS game show of the same namePress Your Luck: 2010 Edition
The 1983 revival debuted on its original network, NBC, on January 3 of that year at 10:30 AM (9:30 AM CT/MT/PT) and remained there until January 2, 1987; the show faced competition against Press Your Luck (which aired on CBS) between September 1983 and January 1986.
Press Your Luck competed against Sale of the Century for first place in the 10:30a.m. morning time slot over the next two years.

Joe Garagiola Sr.

Joe Garagiola
He was replaced by Joe Garagiola, who hosted the remainder of the daytime series plus the one season in syndication.
In the late 1960s and 1970s, Garagiola also hosted the game shows He Said, She Said; Joe Garagiola's Memory Game; Sale of the Century; and To Tell the Truth, as well as the short-lived Strike It Rich.

The Wizard of Odds

It aired at that time slot for the whole of its initial three-and-a-half years on the network, ending its first run on July 13, 1973, after which The Wizard of Odds, the first American program hosted by Alex Trebek, would make its debut.
Relatively short-lived, The Wizard of Odds replaced Sale of the Century at 11:00 AM Eastern (10:00 Central).

Summer Bartholomew

Two months later, Lee Menning replaced her until December 28, 1984, when Summer Bartholomew joined the program and remained as co-host until the 1989 finale.
She became the hostess of the game show Sale of the Century in late 1984 after a brief period as hostess/letter turner on Wheel of Fortune in 1982.

USA Network

USAUSA Cable NetworkUSA Networks
USA aired reruns of the entire 270–episode 1985–86 syndicated series, and 120 episodes (August 1988 – March 1989) of the NBC daytime series from September 14, 1992 to July 29, 1994, for a total of 390 episodes.
The tradition of game-show reruns continued into the 1990s with the $25,000 and $100,000 Pyramids, the early 1990s revivals of The Joker's Wild and Tic-Tac-Dough, and other well-known shows such as Scrabble, Sale of the Century, Talk About, and Caesars Challenge. Additionally, two more original game shows were added in June 1994; these were Free 4 All and Quicksilver. In September 1991, the block was reduced to three hours, from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern.

Password Plus and Super Password

Password PlusSuper PasswordPassword Plus/Super Password
Its place on the schedule was taken by Scrabble, which had been airing in the afternoons for several years, in a shuffle that also saw Super Password end after four-and-a-half seasons (its timeslot of 12:00 PM was given back to its affiliates) and the soap opera Generations inherit its place and Scrabble's old timeslot.
The show's final episode aired on March 24, 1989, the same day Sale of the Century aired its series finale.

Game Show Network

GSNExtreme Gong Show 1999 - Episode #1.88 (1999)Funny Money
GSN carried the series from April 1, 2013 until March 27, 2015.
From Fremantle, the network licenses Match Game (Rayburn), Family Feud (Karn, O'Hurley, and Harvey), Card Sharks (Perry and Eubanks), Press Your Luck, and Sale of the Century.

Screen Gems

Winkler ProductionsScreen Gems TelevisionScreen Gems Broadcasting
Sale of the Century (1973–1974)

Reg Grundy Organisation

GrundyGrundy TelevisionGrundy Productions
Reg Grundy Productions was responsible for the production of two highly successful daytime game shows on NBC during the 1980s, Sale of the Century and Scrabble, and produced a revival of Scrabble in 1993.

Letters to Laugh-In

It was one of three NBC game shows to premiere on that date, the other two being the short-lived Letters to Laugh-In and Name Droppers.

Jack Kelly (actor)

Jack KellyJack Kelly Jack Kelly,
Actor Jack Kelly hosted the series from 1969 to 1971, then decided to return to acting full-time.

Sale of the Century (Australian game show)

Sale of the CenturyAustralian Sale of the Century
The rights to Sale of the Century were purchased in 1980 by Australian TV mogul Reg Grundy, who turned the show into a success in Australia (see Sale of the Century (Australian game show)) and eventually sold his format of the series to NBC.

Just Men!

Again, it was one of three NBC game shows premiering on the same date, along with Hit Man and Just Men! (which both lasted only 13 weeks), and like its predecessor spawned a syndicated edition.

MyNetworkTV

MNTMyMNTV
A short-lived revival of the series entitled Temptation, like the recent Australian revival, debuted in syndication on September 10, 2007, following a September 7 preview on MyNetworkTV.

Dutch auction

clockdescending auctiondutch auction system
In case of a tie for the lead, a Dutch auction was usually conducted for the prize, although sometimes the price remained the same.

Bill Wendell

Bill Wendell, then on the staff of NBC, served as announcer for the entire 1969–73 version.

Lee Menning

Two months later, Lee Menning replaced her until December 28, 1984, when Summer Bartholomew joined the program and remained as co-host until the 1989 finale.

Don Morrow

Jay Stewart announced until his retirement in January 1988, when he was replaced by Don Morrow.