Salisbury Plain

Stonehenge, the most famous antiquity on Salisbury Plain
Rough map of military training area (green) on Salisbury Plain within Wiltshire (blue) (it accounts for about half the area of Salisbury Plain)
Stonehenge, on Salisbury Plain
Military use makes some areas of the plain inaccessible to the public.
Typical grassland at Netheravon Down.
The burnt-tip orchid (Neotinea ustulata) can be found on Salisbury Plain
The Duke of Burgundy butterfly (Hamearis lucina)
The cuckoo bee Nomada armata
The fairy shrimp Chirocephalus diaphanus
The stone curlew

Chalk plateau in the south western part of central southern England covering 300 sqmi.

- Salisbury Plain
Stonehenge, the most famous antiquity on Salisbury Plain

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Stonehenge

Wiltshire

Historic and ceremonial county in South West England with an area of 3485 km2.

Historic and ceremonial county in South West England with an area of 3485 km2.

Stonehenge
Cherhill White Horse, east of Calne
The County Ground, Swindon is the home of Swindon Town, the only football league club in Wiltshire
A bridge over the River Avon at Bradford-on-Avon
The flight of 16 locks at Caen Hill on the Kennet and Avon Canal

Salisbury Plain is noted for being the location of the Stonehenge and Avebury stone circles (which together are a UNESCO Cultural and World Heritage site ) and other ancient landmarks, and as a training area for the British Army.

Garrison Church of St Alban the Martyr

Larkhill

Garrison town in the civil parish of Durrington, Wiltshire, England.

Garrison town in the civil parish of Durrington, Wiltshire, England.

Garrison Church of St Alban the Martyr
Memorial to Capt Loraine and Staff-Sgt Wilson, killed 1912, outside the Stonehenge Visitors' Centre (December 2013)

It is now one of the main garrisons on Salisbury Plain, along with Tidworth Camp, Bulford Camp, and Waterloo Lines at Warminster.

River Wylye

Chalk stream in the south of England, with clear water flowing over gravel.

Chalk stream in the south of England, with clear water flowing over gravel.

The river at Kingston Deverill

The river passes through or touches the parishes of Bishopstrow, Norton Bavant, Heytesbury, Knook, Upton Lovell, Boyton, Codford, Stockton, Wylye and Wilton, near the southern edge of Salisbury Plain.

A reconstruction of Old Sarum in the 12th century, housed at Salisbury Cathedral

Old Sarum

Now ruined and deserted site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury.

Now ruined and deserted site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury.

A reconstruction of Old Sarum in the 12th century, housed at Salisbury Cathedral
An 1829 sketch of Old Sarum by John Constable, displaying the site of the abandoned hillfort
A 1916 plan of Old Sarum by the Ordnance Survey (300 ft ≈ 92 m)
Aerial view of Old Sarum
The present ruins: the exposed foundations of the cathedral in the foreground and the Norman central motte behind
The exposed foundations of the cathedral

This heyday of the settlement lasted for around 300 years until disputes between the Sheriff of Wiltshire and the Bishop of Salisbury finally led to the removal of the church into the nearby plain.

Danebury Fort – aerial image

Hampshire

County in South East England on the coast of the English Channel.

County in South East England on the coast of the English Channel.

Danebury Fort – aerial image
Plaque on Freemantle Common marking the route of the Roman Road from Chichester to Bitterne
Portchester combined Roman and Norman castles
Portsmouth historic dockyard, 2005
South West Hampshire & South East Dorset green belt (shown in green)
New Forest Pony in Burley
Winchester Cathedral
Hampshire County Council offices and Jubilee Fountain
Eastleigh railway works
Southampton Docks
The M3 near Basingstoke
County flag of Hampshire
Milestones Museum, Basingstoke
Ageas Bowl cricket ground, West End, 2010
Fratton Park football ground, Portsmouth, from Milton End, 2006
Former Hampshire Chronicle office in Winchester, circa 1999

Hampshire played a crucial role in both World Wars due to the large Royal Navy naval base at Portsmouth, the army camp at Aldershot, and the military Netley Hospital on Southampton Water, as well as its proximity to the army training ranges on Salisbury Plain and the Isle of Purbeck.

Brass Point, one of the Seven Sisters

Chalk Group

Lithostratigraphic unit (a certain number of rock strata) which contains the Upper Cretaceous limestone succession in southern and eastern England.

Lithostratigraphic unit (a certain number of rock strata) which contains the Upper Cretaceous limestone succession in southern and eastern England.

Brass Point, one of the Seven Sisters
The Needles, (Isle of Wight); part of southern England's extensive chalk outcrop.
Fossil echinoid Echinocorys from the Chalk Group of England
Contact between two units of the lithostratigraphy of South England: the Chalk Group (left, white, upper unit) and the Greensand Formation (right, green, lower unit). Location: Lulworth Cove, near West Lulworth, Dorset, England.
The Wealden Anticline.
Ivinghoe Beacon, Chiltern Hills

The broadly western margin of the Chalk outcrop is marked, from northeast to southwest, to south by the Chalk downlands of the Yorkshire Wolds, the Lincolnshire Wolds, a subdued feature through western Norfolk, including Breckland, the Chiltern Hills, the Berkshire Downs, Marlborough Downs and the western margins of Salisbury Plain and Cranborne Chase and the North and South Dorset Downs.

Guglielmo Marconi

Italian inventor and electrical engineer, known for his creation of a practical radio wave-based wireless telegraph system.

Italian inventor and electrical engineer, known for his creation of a practical radio wave-based wireless telegraph system.

Marconi's first transmitter incorporating a monopole antenna. It consisted of an elevated copper sheet (top) connected to a Righi spark gap (left) powered by an induction coil (center) with a telegraph key (right) to switch it on and off to spell out text messages in Morse code.
British Post Office engineers inspect Marconi's radio equipment during a demonstration on Flat Holm Island, 13 May 1897. The transmitter is at centre, the coherer receiver below it, and the pole supporting the wire antenna is visible at top.
Plaque on the outside of the BT Centre commemorates Marconi's first public transmission of wireless signals.
SS Ponce entering New York Harbor 1899, by Milton J. Burns
Marconi watching associates raising the kite (a "Levitor" by B.F.S. Baden-Powell ) used to lift the antenna at St. John's, Newfoundland, December 1901
Magnetic detector by Marconi used during the experimental campaign aboard a ship in summer 1902, exhibited at the Museo Nazionale Scienza e Tecnologia Leonardo da Vinci of Milan.
Marconi demonstrating apparatus he used in his first long-distance radio transmissions in the 1890s. The transmitter is at right, the receiver with paper tape recorder at left.
Marconi caricatured by Leslie Ward for Vanity Fair, 1905
Villa Marconi, with Marconi's tomb in foreground.
American electrical engineer Alfred Norton Goldsmith and Marconi on 26 June 1922.
Guglielmo and Beatrice Marconi c. 1910
Memorial plaque in the Basilica Santa Croce, Florence. Italy
Guglielmo Marconi Memorial in Washington, D.C.
Bronze statue of Guglielmo Marconi, sculpted by Saleppichi Giancarlo erected 1975 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

A further series of demonstrations for the British followed, and, by March 1897, Marconi had transmitted Morse code signals over a distance of about 6 km across Salisbury Plain.

"Concentration Camp" at RFC Netheravon, June 1914

Netheravon Airfield

"Concentration Camp" at RFC Netheravon, June 1914
RFC aircraft and tents at Netheravon, June 1914
Part of the officers' quarters at Airfield Camp
DH.89A Dragon Rapide G-AJHO of the Army Parachute Association at Netheravon, 1968
Control tower in 2007

Netheravon Airfield is a Ministry of Defence grass strip airfield on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, England.

A US Army Signal Corps radio operator in 1943 in New Guinea transmitting by radiotelegraphy

Wireless telegraphy

Transmission of telegraph signals by radio waves.

Transmission of telegraph signals by radio waves.

A US Army Signal Corps radio operator in 1943 in New Guinea transmitting by radiotelegraphy
Amateur radio operator transmitting Morse code
Tesla's explanation in the 1919 issue of "Electrical Experimenter" on how he thought his wireless system would work
Thomas Edison's 1891 patent for a ship-to-shore wireless telegraph that used electrostatic induction
Example of transatlantic radiotelegraph message recorded on paper tape at RCA's New York receiving center in 1920. The translation of the Morse code is given below the tape.
In World War I balloons were used as a quick way to raise wire antennas for military field radiotelegraph stations. Balloons at Tempelhofer Field, Germany, 1908.
Guglielmo Marconi, the father of radio-based wireless telegraphy, in 1901, with one of his first wireless transmitters (right) and receivers (left)
German troops erecting a wireless field telegraph station during World War I
German officers and troops manning a wireless field telegraph station during World War I
Mobile radio station in German South West Africa, using a hydrogen balloon to lift the antenna

Preece and the GPO in Britain at first supported and gave financial backing to Marconi's experiments conducted on Salisbury Plain from 1896.

Gaza Road, Bulford Camp

Bulford Camp

Gaza Road, Bulford Camp
Cpl. O'Sullivan at Bulford Camp
Church of St George, Bulford Camp

Bulford Camp is a military camp on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England.