Salmon P. Chase

Salmon ChaseChaseSalmon Portland ChaseSecretary of the Treasury ChaseChief Justice ChaseChase, Salmon P.Salmon P Chase
Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was a U.S. politician and jurist who served as the sixth Chief Justice of the United States.wikipedia
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Free Soil Party

Free SoilFree SoilerFree Soilers
In 1848, he helped establish the Free Soil Party and recruited former President Martin Van Buren to serve as the party's presidential nominee.
Led by individuals like Salmon P. Chase of Ohio, John P. Hale of New Hampshire, and Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, the Free Soilers strongly opposed the Compromise of 1850, which temporarily settled the issue of slavery in the Mexican Cession.

Chief Justice of the United States

Chief JusticeChief Justice of the United States Supreme CourtChief Justice of the Supreme Court
Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was a U.S. politician and jurist who served as the sixth Chief Justice of the United States.
In 1866, Salmon P. Chase assumed the title of Chief Justice of the United States and Congress began using the new title in subsequent legislation.

Union (American Civil War)

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Chase served in that position from 1861 to 1864, working hard to ensure the Union was well-financed during the Civil War.
With William Seward at State, Salmon P. Chase at the Treasury, and (from 1862) Edwin Stanton at the War Department, Lincoln had a powerful cabinet of determined men.

1860 Republican National Convention

1860Republican National Convention1860 convention
Chase sought the Republican nomination for president in the 1860 presidential election, but the party chose Abraham Lincoln at its National Convention.
Entering the 1860 convention, Senator William H. Seward of New York was generally regarded as the front-runner, but Lincoln, Governor Salmon P. Chase of Ohio, former Congressman Edward Bates of Missouri, and Senator Simon Cameron of Pennsylvania all commanded support from a significant share of delegates.

List of governors of Ohio

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He also served as the 23rd Governor of Ohio, represented Ohio in the United States Senate, and served as the 25th United States Secretary of the Treasury.

Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

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He presided over the Senate trial of President Andrew Johnson during the impeachment proceedings of 1868.
The trial in the Senate began three days later, with Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presiding.

Radical Republicans

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Chase resigned from the Cabinet in June 1864, but retained support among the Radical Republicans.
Lincoln put all factions in his cabinet, including Radicals like Salmon P. Chase (Secretary of the Treasury), whom he later appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, James Speed (Attorney General) and Edwin M. Stanton (Secretary of War).

Salmon P. Chase Birthplace

The Salmon P. Chase Birthplace and childhood home still stands in Cornish, New Hampshire.
Salmon P. Chase Birthplace was the birthplace and childhood home of Salmon P. Chase.

Philander Chase

Reverend Philander Chase
His mother was left with ten children and few resources, and so Salmon lived from 1820 to 1824 in Ohio with his uncle Bishop Philander Chase, a leading figure in the Protestant Episcopal Church in the West.
While Philander Chase was bishop of Ohio (as discussed below), his 12-year-old nephew, Salmon P. Chase became his ward (his father having died).

Loveland, Ohio

LovelandLoveland OhioLoveland, OH
Chase moved to a country home near Loveland, Ohio, and practiced law in Cincinnati from 1830.
Future Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase maintained a country home near Loveland, while the Cincinnati YWCA maintained a summer cottage there.

1860 United States presidential election

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Chase sought the Republican nomination for president in the 1860 presidential election, but the party chose Abraham Lincoln at its National Convention.
William H. Seward from New York was considered the front-runner, followed by Abraham Lincoln from Illinois, Salmon P. Chase from Ohio, and Missouri's Edward Bates.

1868 United States presidential election

18681868 presidential electionpresidential election of 1868
He unsuccessfully sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 1868 and the Liberal Republican nomination in 1872.
Seymour still hoped it would be Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase, but on the twenty-second ballot, the chairman of the Ohio delegation announced, "at the unanimous request and demand of the delegation I place Horatio Seymour in nomination with twenty-one votes-against his inclination, but no longer against his honor."

Abraham Lincoln

LincolnPresident LincolnPresident Abraham Lincoln
Chase sought the Republican nomination for president in the 1860 presidential election, but the party chose Abraham Lincoln at its National Convention.
In the aftermath of the 1858 election, newspapers frequently mentioned Lincoln as a potential Republican presidential candidate, rivaled by William H. Seward, Salmon P. Chase, Edward Bates, and Simon Cameron.

Kansas–Nebraska Act

Kansas-Nebraska ActKansas–Nebraska BillKansas-Nebraska Bill
Chase won election to the Senate the following year, and he opposed the Compromise of 1850 and the Kansas–Nebraska Act.
The day after the bill was reintroduced, two Ohioans, Representative Joshua Giddings and Senator Salmon P. Chase, published a free-soil response, "Appeal of the Independent Democrats in Congress to the People of the United States: "We arraign this bill as a gross violation of a sacred pledge; as a criminal betrayal of precious rights; as part and parcel of an atrocious plot to exclude from a vast unoccupied region immigrants from the Old World and free laborers from our own States, and convert it into a dreary region of despotism, inhabited by masters and slaves."

Cornish, New Hampshire

CornishCornish CityCornish City, New Hampshire
Born in Cornish, New Hampshire, Chase studied law under Attorney General William Wirt before establishing a legal practice in Cincinnati.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
His argument in the case of Jones v. Van Zandt on the constitutionality of fugitive slave laws before the U.S. Supreme Court attracted particular attention.
In the Reconstruction era, the Chase, Waite, and Fuller Courts (1864–1910) interpreted the new Civil War amendments to the Constitution and developed the doctrine of substantive due process (Lochner v. New York; Adair v. United States).

Andrew Johnson

JohnsonPresident Andrew JohnsonPresident Johnson
He presided over the Senate trial of President Andrew Johnson during the impeachment proceedings of 1868.
Lincoln died at 7:22 am the next morning; Johnson's swearing in occurred between 10 and 11 am with Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presiding in the presence of most of the Cabinet.

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriett Beecher StoweHarrietStowe
Chase was also a member of the literary Semi-Colon Club; its members included Harriet Beecher Stowe and Calvin Ellis Stowe.
There, she also joined the Semi-Colon Club, a literary salon and social club whose members included the Beecher sisters, Caroline Lee Hentz, Salmon P. Chase (future governor of the state and Secretary of Treasury under President Lincoln), Emily Blackwell and others.

Liberty Party (United States, 1840)

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Chase left the Whig Party in 1841 to become the leader of Ohio's Liberty Party.
A member of the Liberty Party who later rose to great political prominence as a Free-Soiler and Republican was Salmon P. Chase.

Dudley Chase

U.S. Senator Dudley Chase of Vermont was another uncle.
Dudley Chase was the son of Dudley & Alice (Corbett) Chase, an uncle of Salmon P. Chase (Treasury Secretary, 1861–1864 and Chief Justice of the United States, 1864–1873) and Dudley Chase Denison (a U.S. Representative from Vermont).

Appeal of the Independent Democrats

Appeal of the Independent Democrats in Congress to the People of the United States
The "Appeal of the Independent Democrats in Congress to the People of the United States", written by Chase and Giddings, and published in The New York Times on January 24, 1854, may be regarded as the earliest draft of the Republican party creed.
The Appeal was signed by then-prominent American politicians Salmon Chase, Charles Sumner, Joshua Giddings, Edward Wade, Gerrit Smith and Alexander De Witt.

1864 United States presidential election

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The Republican Party had at that point already nominated Lincoln as its presidential candidate and the Treasury was in solid shape, so Lincoln no longer needed to keep Chase in the cabinet to forestall a challenge for the presidential nomination.
Despite some intra-party opposition from Salmon Chase and the Radical Republicans, Lincoln won his party's nomination at the 1864 National Union National Convention.

Dartmouth College

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He studied in the common schools of Windsor, Vermont, and Worthington, Ohio, and at Cincinnati College before entering the junior class at Dartmouth College.
Two Dartmouth alumni have served as justices on the Supreme Court of the United States: Salmon P. Chase and Levi Woodbury.

Liberal Republican Party (United States)

Liberal RepublicanLiberal Republican PartyLiberal Republicans
He unsuccessfully sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 1868 and the Liberal Republican nomination in 1872.

William H. Seward

William SewardWilliam Henry SewardSeward
With the exception of William H. Seward, Chase was the most prominent Republican in the country and had done more against slavery than any other Republican.
He gained further publicity in association with Ohioan Salmon P. Chase when handling the unsuccessful appeal in the United States Supreme Court of John Van Zandt, an anti-slavery advocate sued by a slaveowner for assisting African Americans in escaping on the Underground Railroad.