Salzburg Festivalwikipedia
The Salzburg Festival (Salzburger Festspiele) is a prominent festival of music and drama established in 1920.
SalzburgSalzburger FestspieleSalzburg Summer FestivalFestivalSalzburg FestivalSalzburg Whitsun FestivalSalzburger FestspielenSalzburg FestspielhausMozarteum Summer FestivalSalzburg Biennale

Max Reinhardt

Max ReinhardtReinhardtMax Reinhardt (Goldman)
At the close of the war in 1918, the festival's revival was championed by five men now regarded as its founders: the poet and dramatist Hugo von Hofmannsthal, the composer Richard Strauss, the scenic designer Alfred Roller, the conductor Franz Schalk, and the director Max Reinhardt, then intendant of the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, who had produced the first performance of Hofmannsthal's play Jedermann at the Berlin Zirkus Schumann arena in 1911.
In 1920, he established the Salzburg Festival with the performance of Hofmannsthal's Jedermann.

Felsenreitschule

The following year the adjacent former episcopal Felsenreitschule riding academy, carved into the Mönchsberg rock face, was converted into a theater, inaugurated with a performance of Servant of Two Masters by Carlo Goldoni. In 1936, the festival featured a performance by the Trapp Family Singers, whose story was later dramatized as the musical and film The Sound of Music (featuring a scene of the Trapp Family singing at the Felsenreitschule, but inaccurately set in 1938).
The Felsenreitschule (literally "rock riding school") is a theatre in Salzburg, Austria and a venue of the Salzburg Festival.

Bruno Walter

Bruno WalterWalterBruno Schlesinger
During the years from 1934 to 1937 famed conductors such as Arturo Toscanini and Bruno Walter conducted many performances.
He worked closely with Gustav Mahler, whose music he helped to establish in the repertory, held major positions with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Concertgebouw Orchestra, Salzburg Festival, Vienna State Opera, Bavarian State Opera, Staatsoper Unter den Linden and Deutsche Oper Berlin, among others, made recordings of historical and artistic significance, and is widely considered to be one of the great conductors of the 20th century.

Kleines Festspielhaus

House for MozartHaus für MozartSalzburg Festival Hall
In the 21st century, the original festival hall, suitable only for concerts, was reconstructed as a third venue for fully staged opera and concert performances and reopened in 2006 as the Haus für Mozart (House for Mozart). In 2007, Riccardo Muti became the artistic director of the festival under a five-year contract during which he presented fully staged performances of operatic rarities from the 18th and 19th century Neapolitan School of opera in the Haus für Mozart.
It is one of the venues of the Salzburg Festival in the city of Salzburg.

Franz Schalk

Franz
At the close of the war in 1918, the festival's revival was championed by five men now regarded as its founders: the poet and dramatist Hugo von Hofmannsthal, the composer Richard Strauss, the scenic designer Alfred Roller, the conductor Franz Schalk, and the director Max Reinhardt, then intendant of the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, who had produced the first performance of Hofmannsthal's play Jedermann at the Berlin Zirkus Schumann arena in 1911.
He was later involved in the establishment of the Salzburg Festival.

Georg Solti

Sir Georg SoltiSoltiGeorg Solti
Toscanini resigned in protest, artists of Jewish descent like Reinhardt and Georg Solti had to emigrate, and Jedermann, last performed by Attila Hörbiger, had to be dropped.
In the 1930s, he was a répétiteur at the Hungarian State Opera and worked at the Salzburg Festival for Arturo Toscanini.

Arturo Toscanini

ToscaniniArturo ToscaniniArturo '''Toscanini
During the years from 1934 to 1937 famed conductors such as Arturo Toscanini and Bruno Walter conducted many performances.
In the 1930s, he conducted at the Salzburg Festival (1934–1937), as well as the 1936 inaugural concert of the Palestine Orchestra (later renamed the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra) in Tel Aviv, later conducting them in Jerusalem, Haifa, Cairo and Alexandria.

ORF (broadcaster)

ORFÖsterreichischer RundfunkÖsterreichischer Rundfunk (ORF)
At that time the festival had already developed a large-scale program including live broadcasts by the Austrian RAVAG radio network.
First live radio broadcasts aired in 1925, transmitted from the Vienna State Opera and the Salzburg Festival.

The Sound of Music (film)

The Sound of MusicfilmSound of Music
In 1936, the festival featured a performance by the Trapp Family Singers, whose story was later dramatized as the musical and film The Sound of Music (featuring a scene of the Trapp Family singing at the Felsenreitschule, but inaccurately set in 1938).
Impressed by the children's singing, Max proposes he enter them in the upcoming Salzburg Festival but the suggestion is immediately rejected by the Captain as he is opposed to his children singing in public.

Jedermann (play)

JedermannEverymanplay of the same name
At the close of the war in 1918, the festival's revival was championed by five men now regarded as its founders: the poet and dramatist Hugo von Hofmannsthal, the composer Richard Strauss, the scenic designer Alfred Roller, the conductor Franz Schalk, and the director Max Reinhardt, then intendant of the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, who had produced the first performance of Hofmannsthal's play Jedermann at the Berlin Zirkus Schumann arena in 1911. One highlight is the annual performance of the play Jedermann (Everyman) by Hugo von Hofmannsthal.
Jedermann has been performed annually at the Salzburg Festival since 1920, except between 1922 and 1925 and during the years of the Nazi annexation of Austria and World War II from 1938 until 1946.

Wolfgang Rihm

Wolfgang RihmRihmW. Rihm
In 2010, the opera Dionysos by Wolfgang Rihm who compiled for his own libretto texts from Nietzsche's Dionysian-Dithyrambs premiered.
Rihm is musical director of the Institute of New Music and Media at the University of Music Karlsruhe and has been composer in residence at the Lucerne Festival and the Salzburg Festival.

Hugo von Hofmannsthal

Hugo von HofmannsthalHofmannsthalElectra
At the close of the war in 1918, the festival's revival was championed by five men now regarded as its founders: the poet and dramatist Hugo von Hofmannsthal, the composer Richard Strauss, the scenic designer Alfred Roller, the conductor Franz Schalk, and the director Max Reinhardt, then intendant of the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, who had produced the first performance of Hofmannsthal's play Jedermann at the Berlin Zirkus Schumann arena in 1911. One highlight is the annual performance of the play Jedermann (Everyman) by Hugo von Hofmannsthal.
In 1911 he adapted the 15th century English morality play Everyman as Jedermann, and Jean Sibelius (amongst others) wrote incidental music for it. The play later became a staple at the Salzburg Festival.

Alessandro Moissi

Alessandro MoissiAleksandër MoisiuMaria Moissi
The Salzburg Festival was officially inaugurated on 22 August 1920 with Reinhardt's performance of Hofmannsthal's Jedermann on the steps of Salzburg Cathedral, starring Alexander Moissi.
In 1920 he played the leading part in the first performance of Hugo von Hofmannsthal's Jedermann adaption of The Somonyng of Everyman at the Salzburg Festival.

Großes Festspielhaus

Great Festival HallFestspielhaus
In 1960 the Great Festival Hall (Großes Festspielhaus) opera house opened its doors.
The Großes Festspielhaus (Large Festival House) was designed by architect Clemens Holzmeister in 1956 for the Salzburg Festival in Austria.

Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge

Bridge VariationsFrank Bridge Variations
In 1937, Boyd Neel and his orchestra premiered Benjamin Britten’s Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge at the Festival.
It was written in 1937 at the request of Boyd Neel, who conducted his orchestra at the premiere of the work at that year's Salzburg Festival.

Herbert von Karajan

Herbert von KarajanKarajanHerbert-von-Karajan
The post-war festival slowly regained its prominence as a summer opera festival, especially for works by Mozart, with conductor Herbert von Karajan becoming artistic director in 1956.
In 1933 Karajan made his conducting debut at the Salzburg Festival with the Walpurgisnacht Scene in Max Reinhardt's production of Faust.

Clemens Holzmeister

The first festival hall was erected in 1925 at the former Archbishops' horse stables on the northern foot of the Mönchsberg mountain, on the basis of plans by Clemens Holzmeister; it opened with Gozzi's Turandot dramatized by Karl Vollmöller.
Holzmeister repeatedly worked as a stage designer beginning in the 1930s in collaboration with Max Reinhardt for whom he created the Faust-City for the Salzburg Festival.

Attila Hörbiger

Attila
Toscanini resigned in protest, artists of Jewish descent like Reinhardt and Georg Solti had to emigrate, and Jedermann, last performed by Attila Hörbiger, had to be dropped.
From 1935 to 1937, and again from 1947 to 1951, he took the title role in the summer performances of Hofmannsthal's play Jedermann (Everyman) at the Salzburg Festival – according to Max Reinhardt the best actor ever in this role.

Gerard Mortier

Gerard MortierGérard Mortier
Upon Karajan's death in 1989, the festival was drastically modernized and expanded by director Gerard Mortier, who was succeeded by Peter Ruzicka in 2001.
He subsequently held the general directorship of the Salzburg Festival from 1991 to 2001.

Peter Ruzicka

Peter Ruzicka
Upon Karajan's death in 1989, the festival was drastically modernized and expanded by director Gerard Mortier, who was succeeded by Peter Ruzicka in 2001.
From 2001 to 2006, Ruzicka took over the Artistic Directorship of the Salzburg Festival.

Markus Hinterhäuser

In 2006, the festival was led by intendant Jürgen Flimm and concert director Markus Hinterhäuser.
Markus Hinterhäuser (born 30 March 1958 in La Spezia, Italy) is an Austrian pianist and the current Artistic Director of the Salzburg Festival.

Riccardo Muti

MutiRiccardo MutiMaestro Muti
In 2007, Riccardo Muti became the artistic director of the festival under a five-year contract during which he presented fully staged performances of operatic rarities from the 18th and 19th century Neapolitan School of opera in the Haus für Mozart.
Since 1971 he has been a frequent conductor of operas and concerts at the Salzburg Festival, where he is particularly known for his Mozart opera performances.

Boyd Neel

NeelBoyd Neel OrchestraPhilomusica of London
In 1937, Boyd Neel and his orchestra premiered Benjamin Britten’s Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge at the Festival.
In 1937, Neel and his orchestra were invited to the Salzburg Festival, for which Neel commissioned Britten's Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge.

Salzburg

SalzburgSalzburg, AustriaIuvavum
It is held each summer (for five weeks starting in late July) in the Austrian town of Salzburg, the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Falstaff (opera)

FalstaffNanettaNannetta
As this summer festival gained fame and stature as a venue for opera, drama, and classical concert presentation, its musical repertoire concentrated on Mozart and Strauss, but other works, such as Verdi's Falstaff and Beethoven's Fidelio, were also performed.
He took the work to Germany and Austria in the late 1920s and the 1930s, conducting it in Vienna, Berlin and at three successive Salzburg Festivals.