Sam Peckinpah

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David Samuel Peckinpah (February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director and screenwriter who achieved prominence following the release of the Western epic The Wild Bunch (1969).wikipedia
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The Wild Bunch

1969 Western filmfilmfilm of the same name
David Samuel Peckinpah (February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director and screenwriter who achieved prominence following the release of the Western epic The Wild Bunch (1969).
The Wild Bunch is a 1969 American revisionist western film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring William Holden, Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, Edmond O'Brien, Ben Johnson and Warren Oates.

Major Dundee

Some of his films, including Major Dundee (1965), Straw Dogs (1971), The Getaway (1972), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974) and Cross of Iron (1977), remain controversial.
Major Dundee is a 1965 Western film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring Charlton Heston, Richard Harris, Jim Hutton, and James Coburn.

Straw Dogs (1971 film)

Straw Dogssame name1971
Some of his films, including Major Dundee (1965), Straw Dogs (1971), The Getaway (1972), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974) and Cross of Iron (1977), remain controversial.
Straw Dogs is a 1971 psychological thriller film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring Dustin Hoffman and Susan George.

The Getaway (1972 film)

The Getaway1972film of the same name
Some of his films, including Major Dundee (1965), Straw Dogs (1971), The Getaway (1972), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974) and Cross of Iron (1977), remain controversial.
The Getaway is a 1972 American crime film directed by Sam Peckinpah and written by Walter Hill, based on the 1958 novel by Jim Thompson.

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

Tráiganme la Cabeza de Alfredo GarcíaTráinganme la cabeza de Alfredo García
Some of his films, including Major Dundee (1965), Straw Dogs (1971), The Getaway (1972), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974) and Cross of Iron (1977), remain controversial.
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (Tráiganme la cabeza de Alfredo García) is a 1974 Mexican-American neo-Western film directed by Sam Peckinpah, co-written by Peckinpah and Gordon Dawson from a story by Peckinpah and Frank Kowalski, and starring Warren Oates and Isela Vega, with Robert Webber, Gig Young, Helmut Dantine, Emilio Fernández and Kris Kristofferson in supporting roles.

Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid

Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
Some of his films, including Major Dundee (1965), Straw Dogs (1971), The Getaway (1972), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974) and Cross of Iron (1977), remain controversial.
Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is a 1973 American western drama film directed by Sam Peckinpah, written by Rudy Wurlitzer, and starring James Coburn, Kris Kristofferson, Richard Jaeckel, Katy Jurado, Chill Wills, Barry Sullivan, Jason Robards and Bob Dylan.

Cross of Iron

The Cross of Iron
Some of his films, including Major Dundee (1965), Straw Dogs (1971), The Getaway (1972), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974) and Cross of Iron (1977), remain controversial.
Cross of Iron (German: Steiner – Das Eiserne Kreuz, lit. "Steiner – The Iron Cross") is a 1977 war film directed by Sam Peckinpah, featuring James Coburn, Maximilian Schell, James Mason and David Warner.

Revisionist Western

anti-WesternRevisionistRevisionist Western film
He was known for the visually innovative and explicit depiction of action and violence as well as his revisionist approach to the Western genre.
Films in this category include Sam Peckinpah's Ride the High Country (1962) and The Wild Bunch (1969), Arthur Penn's Little Big Man (1970) and Robert Altman's McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971).

David Peckinpah

Sam Peckinpah's nephew is David Peckinpah, who was a television producer and director, as well as a screenplay writer.
David was the nephew of legendary film director Sam Peckinpah and son of Denver "Denny" Peckinpah, a Fresno County Superior Court Judge.

L. Q. Jones

L.Q. JonesL Q Jones
He worked as a dialogue coach on four additional Siegel films: Private Hell 36 (1954), An Annapolis Story, (1955, and co-starring L. Q. Jones), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) and Crime in the Streets (1956). He used such actors as Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson, and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum) in many of his films, and several of his friends and assistants stuck by him to the end of his life.
L. Q. Jones (born Justus Ellis McQueen Jr. on August 19, 1927) is an American actor and director best known for his work in the films of Sam Peckinpah.

Warren Oates

He used such actors as Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson, and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum) in many of his films, and several of his friends and assistants stuck by him to the end of his life.
Warren Mercer Oates (July 5, 1928 – April 3, 1982) was an American actor best known for his performances in several films directed by Sam Peckinpah, including The Wild Bunch (1969) and Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974).

R. G. Armstrong

R.G. ArmstrongR G Armstrong
He used such actors as Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson, and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum) in many of his films, and several of his friends and assistants stuck by him to the end of his life.
A veteran character actor who appeared in dozens of Westerns over the course of his 40-year career, he may be best remembered for his work with director Sam Peckinpah.

Jerry Fielding

Jerry FeldmanJerry Fielding And His Orchestra
He used such actors as Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson, and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum) in many of his films, and several of his friends and assistants stuck by him to the end of his life.
Joshua Itzhak Feldman (June 17, 1922 – February 17, 1980), known professionally as Jerry Fielding, was an American jazz musician, arranger, band leader, and film composer who emerged in the 1960s after a decade on the blacklist to create boldly diverse and evocative Oscar-nominated scores, primarily for gritty, often brutally savage, films in western and crime action genres, including the Sam Peckinpah movies The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).

One-Eyed Jacks

One Eyed JacksOne-Eyed-Jacks
Peckinpah wrote a screenplay from the novel The Authentic Death of Hendry Jones, a draft that evolved into the 1961 Marlon Brando film One-Eyed Jacks.
It was originally planned to be directed by Stanley Kubrick from a screenplay by Sam Peckinpah, but studio disputes led to their replacement by Brando and Guy Trosper.

The Westerner (TV series)

The WesternerThe WestenerThe Westerner'' (TV series)
During this time, he also created the television series The Westerner, starring Brian Keith and in three episodes also featuring John Dehner.
Created, written and produced by Sam Peckinpah, who also directed some episodes, the series was a Four Star Television production.

Ben Johnson (actor)

Ben JohnsonBen Johnson, Jr.
He used such actors as Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson, and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum) in many of his films, and several of his friends and assistants stuck by him to the end of his life.
Johnson also appeared in four films of Sam Peckinpah and had a good relationship with the wayward director.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

The Invasion of the Body Snatchers19561956 film
He worked as a dialogue coach on four additional Siegel films: Private Hell 36 (1954), An Annapolis Story, (1955, and co-starring L. Q. Jones), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) and Crime in the Streets (1956).
Future director Sam Peckinpah had a small part as Charlie, a meter reader.

The Deadly Companions

After cancellation of The Westerner, Brian Keith was cast as the male lead in the 1961 Western film The Deadly Companions.
The Deadly Companions is a 1961 American Western film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring Maureen O'Hara, Brian Keith, Steve Cochran, and Chill Wills.

Ride the High Country

Guns in the Afternoon
His second film, Ride the High Country (1962), was based on the screenplay Guns in the Afternoon written by N.B. Stone, Jr. Producer Richard Lyons admired Peckinpah's work on The Westerner and offered him the directing job.
Ride the High Country (released internationally as Guns in the Afternoon) is a 1962 American Western film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring Randolph Scott, Joel McCrea, and Mariette Hartley.

James Coburn

He used such actors as Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson, and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum) in many of his films, and several of his friends and assistants stuck by him to the end of his life.
Coburn had another excellent support role as a one-armed Indian tracker in Major Dundee (1965), directed by Sam Peckinpah.

Randolph Scott

Starring aging Western stars Joel McCrea and Randolph Scott in their final major screen roles, the film initially went unnoticed in the United States but was an enormous success in Europe.
Scott's more than 30 years as a motion picture actor resulted in his working with many acclaimed screen directors, including Henry King, Rouben Mamoulian, Michael Curtiz, John Cromwell, King Vidor, Allan Dwan, Fritz Lang, Sam Peckinpah, Henry Hathaway (eight times), Ray Enright (seven), Edwin L. Marin (seven), Andre DeToth (six), and most notably, his seven film collaborations with Budd Boetticher.

Joel McCrea

Starring aging Western stars Joel McCrea and Randolph Scott in their final major screen roles, the film initially went unnoticed in the United States but was an enormous success in Europe.
These films include Alfred Hitchcock's espionage thriller Foreign Correspondent (1940), Preston Sturges' comedy classics Sullivan's Travels (1941), and The Palm Beach Story (1942), the romance film Bird of Paradise (1932), the adventure classic The Most Dangerous Game (1932), Gregory La Cava's bawdy comedy Bed of Roses (1933), George Stevens' romantic comedy The More the Merrier (1943), William Wyler's These Three, Come and Get It (both 1936) and Dead End (1937), Howard Hawks' Barbary Coast (1935), and a number of western films, including Wichita (1955) as Wyatt Earp and Sam Peckinpah's Ride the High Country (1962), opposite Randolph Scott.

Will Penny

An episode of the series eventually served as the basis for Tom Gries' 1968 film Will Penny starring Charlton Heston.
The picture was based upon an episode of the 1960 Sam Peckinpah television series The Westerner called "Line Camp," also written and directed by Tom Gries.

Kris Kristofferson

KristoffersonKristoffer KristoffersonGarrett Dylan
He used such actors as Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson, and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum) in many of his films, and several of his friends and assistants stuck by him to the end of his life.
He appeared in Blume in Love (1973) directed by Paul Mazursky, and three Sam Peckinpah films: Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), and Convoy (1978).

Don Siegel

SiegelDonald SiegelDon Seigel
His job entailed acting as an assistant for the movie's director, Don Siegel.
Siegel was also important to the career of director Sam Peckinpah.