Sam Peckinpah's "Salad Days"

Salad DaysSam Peckinpah's ''Salad Days''
"Sam Peckinpah's 'Salad Days" is a sketch from the 7th episode of the third series of the British television programme Monty Python's Flying Circus.wikipedia
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Philip Jenkinson

The sketch begins with a preamble by Eric Idle (impersonating the British film critic Philip Jenkinson), who praises American film director Sam Peckinpah's predilection for the "utterly truthful and very sexually arousing portrayal of violence [sniff] in its starkest form" in Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).
He received up to 50 letters a week asking him to show certain film clips and was satirised by Monty Python in their sketch "Sam Peckinpah's "Salad Days"".

Monty Python's Flying Circus

Monty PythonFlying CircusMonty Python’s Flying Circus
"Sam Peckinpah's 'Salad Days" is a sketch from the 7th episode of the third series of the British television programme Monty Python's Flying Circus.
Eric Idle is known for his roles as a cheeky, suggestive playboy ("Nudge Nudge"), a variety of pretentious television presenters (such as his over-the-top portrayal of Philip Jenkinson in the segments connecting the "Cheese Shop" and "Salad Days" sketches), a crafty, slick salesman ("Door-to-Door Joke Salesman", "Encyclopedia Salesman") and the merchant who loves to haggle in Monty Python’s Life of Brian.

List of Monty Python's Flying Circus episodes

Dead Bishopepisode of ''Monty Python's Flying CircusBicycle Repair Man
"Sam Peckinpah's 'Salad Days" is a sketch from the 7th episode of the third series of the British television programme Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Sam Peckinpah

PeckinpahBloody Sam" PeckinpahDavid "Sam" Peckinpah
The sketch begins with a preamble by Eric Idle (impersonating the British film critic Philip Jenkinson), who praises American film director Sam Peckinpah's predilection for the "utterly truthful and very sexually arousing portrayal of violence [sniff] in its starkest form" in Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).

Blood squirt

blood spatterblood gushblood spurt
before he is gunned down in slow motion, with much spurting blood (and the caption "Tee Hee").
The Monty Python sketch Sam Peckinpah's "Salad Days" (1972) involved an orgy of blood gushing, in a parody of Peckinpah's gore-filled directorial style.

Salad Days (musical)

Salad DaysSalad Days'' (musical)
He then segues to a clip from Peckinpah's latest project, which is an adaptation of the musical Salad Days.
The musical was parodied, in a particularly bloody manner, by Monty Python in their sketch "Sam Peckinpah's Salad Days".

Cheese Shop sketch

Cheese ShopThe Cheese ShopCheese Emporium
This sketch follows the famous Cheese Shop sketch in the television episode.
He then puts on a Stetson, and the sketch segues into Hugh Walpole's Rogue Cheddar and a link to the Sam Peckinpah's "Salad Days" sketch.

Sketch comedy

sketchsketch showsketches
"Sam Peckinpah's 'Salad Days" is a sketch from the 7th episode of the third series of the British television programme Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Eric Idle

The sketch begins with a preamble by Eric Idle (impersonating the British film critic Philip Jenkinson), who praises American film director Sam Peckinpah's predilection for the "utterly truthful and very sexually arousing portrayal of violence [sniff] in its starkest form" in Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).

Sexual arousal

sexually arousedarousalaroused
The sketch begins with a preamble by Eric Idle (impersonating the British film critic Philip Jenkinson), who praises American film director Sam Peckinpah's predilection for the "utterly truthful and very sexually arousing portrayal of violence [sniff] in its starkest form" in Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).

Major Dundee

The sketch begins with a preamble by Eric Idle (impersonating the British film critic Philip Jenkinson), who praises American film director Sam Peckinpah's predilection for the "utterly truthful and very sexually arousing portrayal of violence [sniff] in its starkest form" in Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).

The Wild Bunch

1969 Western filmfilmfilm of the same name
The sketch begins with a preamble by Eric Idle (impersonating the British film critic Philip Jenkinson), who praises American film director Sam Peckinpah's predilection for the "utterly truthful and very sexually arousing portrayal of violence [sniff] in its starkest form" in Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).

Straw Dogs (1971 film)

Straw Dogssame name1971
The sketch begins with a preamble by Eric Idle (impersonating the British film critic Philip Jenkinson), who praises American film director Sam Peckinpah's predilection for the "utterly truthful and very sexually arousing portrayal of violence [sniff] in its starkest form" in Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971).

Upper class

upper-classhigh societyupper
Well-dressed, well-spoken, upper-class youngsters frolic in an idyllic garden around an upright piano, responding enthusiastically to Michael Palin's suggestion of a game of tennis.

Piano

grand pianopianistacoustic piano
Well-dressed, well-spoken, upper-class youngsters frolic in an idyllic garden around an upright piano, responding enthusiastically to Michael Palin's suggestion of a game of tennis.

Michael Palin

Sir Michael PalinMichael Edward PalinPalin
Well-dressed, well-spoken, upper-class youngsters frolic in an idyllic garden around an upright piano, responding enthusiastically to Michael Palin's suggestion of a game of tennis.

Tennis

tennis playerlawn tennisTennis, Boys
Well-dressed, well-spoken, upper-class youngsters frolic in an idyllic garden around an upright piano, responding enthusiastically to Michael Palin's suggestion of a game of tennis.

Tennis ball

tennis ballsballsball
Things go awry when Palin is struck in the face by the ball, causing blood to seep through his fingers.

Racket (sports equipment)

racquettennis racketracket
He reflexively flings his racquet out of shot; we then see that it has become embedded in the stomach of a pretty girl (Nicki Howorth), who faints, tearing off Idle's arm in the process.

John Cleese

Cynthia CleeseJohnCleese
Idle staggers across to the piano and slams down the lid, severing both hands of the pianist (John Cleese).

Graham Chapman

ChapmanPolice Constable Pan-Am
Somehow, Graham Chapman gets impaled by the piano keyboard, which slices off a woman's head when he turns around.

Slow motion

slow-motionslo-moslow-motion video
before he is gunned down in slow motion, with much spurting blood (and the caption "Tee Hee").

Single parent

single mothersingle fathersingle mothers
The end credits roll over his dying agonies, before a serious-sounding Cleese reads an apology to everyone in the entire world (which states that "they didn't mean it"), and that while they all came from broken homes and have very unhappy personal lives (especially Eric), they are actually nice, warm people underneath and urging the viewers not to write or phone complaints about the sketch since the BBC is going through an unhappy phase due to its father dying (Lord Reith had indeed died the previous year) "and BBC 2 going out with men".

BBC

British Broadcasting Corporationthe BBCBBC Music
The end credits roll over his dying agonies, before a serious-sounding Cleese reads an apology to everyone in the entire world (which states that "they didn't mean it"), and that while they all came from broken homes and have very unhappy personal lives (especially Eric), they are actually nice, warm people underneath and urging the viewers not to write or phone complaints about the sketch since the BBC is going through an unhappy phase due to its father dying (Lord Reith had indeed died the previous year) "and BBC 2 going out with men".

John Reith, 1st Baron Reith

John ReithLord ReithSir John Reith
The end credits roll over his dying agonies, before a serious-sounding Cleese reads an apology to everyone in the entire world (which states that "they didn't mean it"), and that while they all came from broken homes and have very unhappy personal lives (especially Eric), they are actually nice, warm people underneath and urging the viewers not to write or phone complaints about the sketch since the BBC is going through an unhappy phase due to its father dying (Lord Reith had indeed died the previous year) "and BBC 2 going out with men".