Samaritan revolts

Samaritan revoltrevoltsSamaritansfailed revoltFirst Samaritan RevoltFourth Samaritan Revolt against ByzantiumrevoltSamaritan insurrections
The Samaritan revolts were a series of insurrections during the 5th and 6th centuries in Palaestina Prima province, launched by the Samaritans against the Byzantine Empire.wikipedia
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Samaritans

SamaritanCutheanIsraelite Samaritans
The Samaritan revolts were a series of insurrections during the 5th and 6th centuries in Palaestina Prima province, launched by the Samaritans against the Byzantine Empire. During the reign of Eastern Roman Emperor Zeno (r. 474-475 and 476-491), tensions between the Christian community and the Samaritans in Neapolis (Shechem) grew dramatically.
Once a large community, the Samaritan population appears to have shrunk significantly in the wake of the bloody suppression of the Samaritan Revolts (mainly in 529 CE and 555 CE) against the Byzantine Empire.

Palaestina Prima

PalestinePalaestinaByzantine period
The Samaritan revolts were a series of insurrections during the 5th and 6th centuries in Palaestina Prima province, launched by the Samaritans against the Byzantine Empire.
The four major Samaritan Revolts during this period caused a near extinction of the Samaritan community, as well as significant Christian losses.

Justa (rebel)

Justa
The Samaritans elected Justa (or Justasas) as their king and moved to Caesarea, where a noteworthy Samaritan community lived.
Justa (or Justasa and Justasus) was elected by Samaritans as their king during the 484 AD Samaritan revolt.

Jewish–Roman wars

Jewish rebellionsJewish ResistanceJewish revolts
Some historians draft comparisons between the consequences of the Samaritan revolts of the 5th and 6th centuries upon Samaritans to the consequences of Jewish–Roman Wars of the 1st and 2nd centuries upon the Jews in the region. Following the period of Jewish–Roman wars, the previously dominating Jewish community went almost extinct across Judaea and the shore of Southern Levant, remaining a majority only in Southern Judea, Galilee and Bashan (Golan).
Samaritan Revolts (484–572) — Samaritan incited revolts, originating largely in Neapolis.

Julianus ben Sabar

Third Samaritan revolt
Under a charismatic, messianic figure named Julianus ben Sabar (or ben Sahir), the Samaritans launched a war, sometimes referred as the final Samaritan revolt, to create their own independent state in 529.
Julianus ben Sabar (also known as Julian or Julianus ben Sahir and Latinized as Iulianus Sabarides) was a messianic leader of the Samaritans, who led a failed revolt against the Byzantine Empire during the early 6th century.

Bar Kokhba revolt

Second Jewish RevoltBar Kokhbarebellion
The Temple of Gerizim was rebuilt after the Bar Kochba revolt in Judaea, around 135 CE. With the withdrawal of Roman legions, Samaria enjoyed a limited kind of independence during the 3rd and 4th centuries.
During the 5th and the 6th centuries, a series of Samaritan revolts broke out across the Palaestina Prima province.

Church of the Nativity

Birthplace of Jesus: Church of the Nativity and the Pilgrimage Route, BethlehemNativity CaveBasilica of the Nativity
The Church of the Nativity was burned down, suggesting that the rebellion had spread south to Bethlehem.
It was destroyed by fire during the Samaritan revolts of the 6th century, and a new basilica was built in 565 by Byzantine Emperor Justinian, who restored the architectural tone of the original.

Bethlehem

Bethlehem DistrictBayt Laḥmbelleem
The Church of the Nativity was burned down, suggesting that the rebellion had spread south to Bethlehem.
Bethlehem was destroyed by the Emperor Hadrian during the second-century Bar Kokhba revolt; its rebuilding was promoted by Empress Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, who commissioned the building of its great Church of the Nativity in 327 CE. The church was badly damaged by the Samaritans, who sacked it during a revolt in 529, but was rebuilt a century later by Emperor Justinian I.

Mount Gerizim

Gerizim
Zeno then took for himself Mount Gerizim, where the Samaritans worshipped God, and built several edifices, among them a tomb for his recently deceased son, on which he put a cross, so that the Samaritans, worshipping God, would prostrate in front of the tomb.
Samaritan Revolts

Jewish revolt against Heraclius

Jewish revoltallianceconquered
The situation of Samaritans further worsened with the failure of Jewish revolt against Heraclius and slaughter of Jewish population in 629.
Jews and Samaritans were persecuted frequently by the Byzantines (eastern Romans) resulting in numerous revolts.

Samaria

ShomronSamaritanSebastia
Further, Samaria, the "world's most fertile land, was left with no one to till it".
Samaritan Revolts

Siege of Caesarea Maritima (614)

conquered Caesarea Maritimain 614invasion
Samaritan Revolts, 484–572 CE

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineByzantinesEastern Roman Empire
The Samaritan revolts were a series of insurrections during the 5th and 6th centuries in Palaestina Prima province, launched by the Samaritans against the Byzantine Empire.

Southern Levant

LevantEarly Iron Agesouth of the Levant
Following the period of Jewish–Roman wars, the previously dominating Jewish community went almost extinct across Judaea and the shore of Southern Levant, remaining a majority only in Southern Judea, Galilee and Bashan (Golan).

Galilee

GalileanWestern GalileeGalileans
Following the period of Jewish–Roman wars, the previously dominating Jewish community went almost extinct across Judaea and the shore of Southern Levant, remaining a majority only in Southern Judea, Galilee and Bashan (Golan).

Golan

Golan I
Following the period of Jewish–Roman wars, the previously dominating Jewish community went almost extinct across Judaea and the shore of Southern Levant, remaining a majority only in Southern Judea, Galilee and Bashan (Golan).

Nabataeans

NabataeanNabateanNabataea
Samaritans and Byzantine Christians filled this vacuum in the central regions of Southern Levant, whereas Nabataeans and Christian Ghassanid Arabs settled the periphery.

Constantinople

ConstantinopolitanIstanbulcapital
This period of semi-independence was brief, however, as Byzantine forces overran Samaria and took Baba Rabba captive to Constantinople, where he died in prison several years later around 362 CE.

List of Byzantine emperors

Byzantine EmperorEmperorEmperor and Autocrat of the Romans
During the reign of Eastern Roman Emperor Zeno (r. 474-475 and 476-491), tensions between the Christian community and the Samaritans in Neapolis (Shechem) grew dramatically.

Zeno (emperor)

ZenoEmperor ZenoFlavius Zeno
During the reign of Eastern Roman Emperor Zeno (r. 474-475 and 476-491), tensions between the Christian community and the Samaritans in Neapolis (Shechem) grew dramatically.

Shechem

ŠakmuSichemJacob's Well
During the reign of Eastern Roman Emperor Zeno (r. 474-475 and 476-491), tensions between the Christian community and the Samaritans in Neapolis (Shechem) grew dramatically.

Synagogue

synagoguesshultemple
The Emperor went to Neapolis, gathered the elders and asked them to convert; when they refused, Zeno had many Samaritans killed, and rebuilt the synagogue into a church.

Aaron's, Inc.

AaronHarunAharon
Later, in 484, the Samaritans revolted, provoked by rumors that the Christians intended to transfer the remains of Aaron's sons and grandsons Eleazar, Ithamar and Phinehas.