Samaritans

SamaritanCutheanIsraelite SamaritansJewish-Samaritannational animositySamaritan JewishSamaritan Temple on Mount GerizimSamaritan traditionsamaritanaSamaritanism
The Samaritans (Samaritan Hebrew: ࠔࠠࠌࠝࠓࠩࠉࠌ,, "Guardians/Keepers/Watchers (of the Torah)") are an ethnoreligious group of the Levant originating from the Israelites (or Hebrews) of the Ancient Near East.wikipedia
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Samaritanism

SamaritanSamaritan JudaismSamaritans
The Samaritans are adherents of Samaritanism, a religion closely related to Judaism.
Samaritan religion is the national religion of the Samaritans.

Samaritan Pentateuch

Samaritan Torahfivehas their own Targum
Samaritans believe that their worship, which is based on the Samaritan Pentateuch, is the true religion of the ancient Israelites from before the Babylonian captivity, preserved by those who remained in the Land of Israel, as opposed to Judaism, which they see as a related but altered and amended religion, brought back by those returning from the Babylonian Captivity.
The Samaritan Pentateuch, also known as the Samaritan Torah ( torah shomronit), is a text of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, written in the Samaritan alphabet and used as scripture by the Samaritans.

Samaritan revolts

Samaritan revoltrevoltsSamaritans
Once a large community, the Samaritan population appears to have shrunk significantly in the wake of the bloody suppression of the Samaritan Revolts (mainly in 529 CE and 555 CE) against the Byzantine Empire.
The Samaritan revolts were a series of insurrections during the 5th and 6th centuries in Palaestina Prima province, launched by the Samaritans against the Byzantine Empire.

Ethnoreligious group

ethno-religiousethnoreligiousethnocultural
The Samaritans (Samaritan Hebrew: ࠔࠠࠌࠝࠓࠩࠉࠌ,, "Guardians/Keepers/Watchers (of the Torah)") are an ethnoreligious group of the Levant originating from the Israelites (or Hebrews) of the Ancient Near East.

Samaritan alphabet

SamaritanAncient Hebrew scriptPaleo-Hebrew derived
For liturgical purposes, Samaritan Hebrew, Samaritan Aramaic, and Arabic are used, all written with the Samaritan alphabet, a variant of the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet, which is distinct from the Hebrew alphabet.
The Samaritan alphabet is used by the Samaritans for religious writings, including the Samaritan Pentateuch, writings in Samaritan Hebrew, and for commentaries and translations in Samaritan Aramaic and occasionally Arabic.

Mount Gerizim

Gerizim
The Samaritans believe that Mount Gerizim was the original Holy Place of Israel from the time that Joshua conquered Canaan.
In Samaritan tradition, Mount Gerizim is held to be the highest, oldest and most central mountain in the world.

Hebrew language

HebrewHeb.Hebrew-language
Most Samaritans in Holon and Qiryat Luza today speak Hebrew and Arabic.
The Samaritan dialect is also the liturgical tongue of the Samaritans, while modern Hebrew or Arabic is their vernacular.

Samaritan Aramaic language

SamaritanSamaritan AramaicAramaic
For liturgical purposes, Samaritan Hebrew, Samaritan Aramaic, and Arabic are used, all written with the Samaritan alphabet, a variant of the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet, which is distinct from the Hebrew alphabet.
Samaritan Aramaic, or Samaritan, was the dialect of Aramaic used by the Samaritans in their sacred and scholarly literature.

Paleo-Hebrew alphabet

Paleo-HebrewPaleo-Hebrew scriptancient Hebrew
For liturgical purposes, Samaritan Hebrew, Samaritan Aramaic, and Arabic are used, all written with the Samaritan alphabet, a variant of the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet, which is distinct from the Hebrew alphabet.
The Samaritans, now fewer than 1,000 people, have continued to use a derivative of the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet, known as the Samaritan alphabet.

Hebrew alphabet

HebrewHebrew scriptHebrew letters
For liturgical purposes, Samaritan Hebrew, Samaritan Aramaic, and Arabic are used, all written with the Samaritan alphabet, a variant of the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet, which is distinct from the Hebrew alphabet.
The Samaritans, who remained in the Land of Israel, continued to use the paleo-Hebrew alphabet.

Nablus

NeapolisFlavia NeapolisNablus District
The reference to Mount Gerizim derives from the biblical story of Moses ordering Joshua to take the Twelve Tribes of Israel to the mountains by Shekhem (Nablus) and place half of the tribes, six in number, on Mount Gerizim, the Mount of the Blessing, and the other half on Mount Ebal, the Mount of the Curse.
The city was named by the Roman Emperor Vespasian in 72 CE as Flavia Neapolis.. The Roman period was followed by the Byzantine period, where in the 5th and 6th centuries, conflict between the city's Christian and Samaritan inhabitants climaxed in a series of Samaritan revolts against Byzantine rule, before their violent quelling in 529 CE drastically dwindled that community's numbers in the city.

Biblical Hebrew

HebrewAncient HebrewBiblical
Biblical Hebrew Šomerim "Guardians" (singular Šomer) comes from the Hebrew Semitic root שמר, which means "to watch, guard".
This was retained by the Samaritans, who use the descendent Samaritan alphabet to this day.

Canaan

Canaaniteland of CanaanCanaanites
Ancestrally, Samaritans claim descent from the tribe of Ephraim and tribe of Manasseh (two sons of Joseph) as well as from the Levites, who have links to ancient Samaria (now constituting the majority of the territory known as the West Bank) from the period of their entry into Canaan, while some Orthodox Jews suggest that it was from the beginning of the Babylonian captivity up to the Samaritan polity under the rule of Baba Rabba.
The Greeks also popularized the term Palestine, named after the Greek Philistines or the Aegean Pelasgians, for roughly the region of Canaan, excluding Phoenicia, with Herodotus' first recorded use of Palaistinê, c. 480 BC. From 110 BC, the Hasmoneans extended their authority over much of the region, creating a Judean-Samaritan-Idumaean-Ituraean-Galilean alliance.

Judaism

JewishJewsJew
The Samaritans are adherents of Samaritanism, a religion closely related to Judaism.
The Samaritans, a very small community located entirely around Mount Gerizim in the Nablus/Shechem region of the West Bank and in Holon, near Tel Aviv in Israel, regard themselves as the descendants of the Israelites of the Iron Age kingdom of Israel.

Holon

Holon, IsraelHolon, Tel-Aviv District
, the population was 796, divided between Qiryat Luza on Mount Gerizim and the city of Holon, just outside Tel Aviv.
In 1954, the president of Israel, Yitzhak Ben-Zvi, helped to establish a Samaritan quarter on the outskirts of Holon.

Who is a Jew?

who is a Jewhalf-Jewhalf-Jewish
While the Israeli Rabbinic authorities consider Samaritanism to be a branch of Judaism, the Chief Rabbinate of Israel requires Samaritans to officially go through a formal conversion to Judaism in order to be recognized as Halakhic Jews.
This was done for the lost Ten Tribes of Israel and the Samaritans.

Abu'l-Fath

Samaritan Chronicle
Abu l-Fath, who in the 14th century wrote a major work of Samaritan history, comments on Samaritan origins as follows:
Abu'l-Fath ibn Abi al-Hasan al-Samiri al-Danafi, was a 14th-century Samaritan Jewish chronicler.

Mount Ebal

The reference to Mount Gerizim derives from the biblical story of Moses ordering Joshua to take the Twelve Tribes of Israel to the mountains by Shekhem (Nablus) and place half of the tribes, six in number, on Mount Gerizim, the Mount of the Blessing, and the other half on Mount Ebal, the Mount of the Curse.
According to the Samaritan Pentateuch version, this instruction actually concerns Mount Gerizim, which the Samaritans view as a holy site; some scholars believe that the Samaritan version is probably more accurate in this respect, the compilers of the masoretic text and authors of the Septuagint being likely to be biased against the Samaritans.

Kutha

CuthahKūthāCuth
In the Talmud, a central post-exilic religious text of Rabbinic Judaism, the Samaritans are called Cutheans (כּוּתִים, Kutim), referring to the ancient city of Kutha, geographically located in what is today Iraq.
The result was a mixture of religions and peoples, the latter being known as "Cuthim" in Hebrew and as "Samaritans" to the Greeks.

Second Temple

TempleJewish TempleSecond
Some date their split with the Jews to the time of Nehemiah, Ezra, and the building of the Second Temple in Jerusalem after the Babylonian exile.
The Samaritans wanted to help with this work but Zerubbabel and the elders declined such cooperation, feeling that the Jews must build the Temple unaided.

Jerusalem

QudsJerusalem, Israelal-Quds
They were temporarily united in the United Monarchy, but after the death of Solomon, the kingdom split in two, the Kingdom of Israel with its last capital city Samaria and the Kingdom of Judah with its capital Jerusalem.
Possibly the redactor of the Apocryphon of Genesis wanted to dissociate Melchizedek from the area of Shechem, which at the time was in possession of the Samaritans.

Nehemiah

Neh.Nehemiah the son of HacaliahNehemya
Some date their split with the Jews to the time of Nehemiah, Ezra, and the building of the Second Temple in Jerusalem after the Babylonian exile.
Once there, Nehemiah defied the opposition of Judah's enemies on all sides—Samaritans, Ammonites, Arabs and Philistines—and rebuilt the walls within 52 days, from the Sheep Gate in the North, the Hananeel Tower at the North West corner, the Fish Gate in the West, the Furnaces Tower at the Temple Mount's South West corner, the Dung Gate in the South, the East Gate and the gate beneath the Golden Gate in the East.

Levant

the LevantLevantineNear East
The Samaritans (Samaritan Hebrew: ࠔࠠࠌࠝࠓࠩࠉࠌ,, "Guardians/Keepers/Watchers (of the Torah)") are an ethnoreligious group of the Levant originating from the Israelites (or Hebrews) of the Ancient Near East.
There are also Circassians, Turks, Samaritans, and Nawars.

Parable of the Good Samaritan

Good SamaritanThe Good SamaritanGood Samaritans
Samaritans appear briefly in the Christian gospels, most notably in the account of the Samaritan woman at the well and the parable of the Good Samaritan.
Finally, a Samaritan happens upon the traveller.

Tribe of Manasseh

ManassehMenassehMenashe
Ancestrally, Samaritans claim descent from the tribe of Ephraim and tribe of Manasseh (two sons of Joseph) as well as from the Levites, who have links to ancient Samaria (now constituting the majority of the territory known as the West Bank) from the period of their entry into Canaan, while some Orthodox Jews suggest that it was from the beginning of the Babylonian captivity up to the Samaritan polity under the rule of Baba Rabba.
The Samaritans claim that some of their adherents are descended from this tribe.