Same-sex marriage in California

Californiasame-sex marriagemarriedsame-sex marriage became legal in Californiasame-sex marriage in the statesame-sex married couples or partnershipsban on same-sex marriageCalifornia lawCalifornia's legalisation of same-sex marriageCalifornian law
Same-sex marriage is legal in the U.S. state of California.wikipedia
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Same-sex marriage in the Ninth Circuit

Ninth Circuit Court of AppealsNinth
On August 4, 2010, United States District Court Chief Judge Vaughn Walker declared Proposition 8 a violation of the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the U.S. Constitution in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, a decision upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on February 7, 2012.
The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, a federal court of the United States, struck down same-sex marriage bans in California, Idaho, and Nevada.

Same-sex marriage in the United States

same-sex marriageUnited Statesgay marriage
The issuance of such licenses was halted from November 5, 2008 through June 27, 2013 (though existing same-sex marriages continued to be valid) due to the passage of Proposition 8—a state constitutional amendment barring same-sex marriages. Before the passage of Proposition 8, California was only the second U.S. state (after Massachusetts) to allow same-sex marriage.

Domestic partnership in California

Californiadomestic partnershipdomestic partnerships
In the wake of Proposition 8’s passage, California continued to allow domestic partnership.
Conversely, advocates of same-sex marriage contend that anything less than full marriage rights extended to same-sex partners is analogous to the "separate but equal" racial laws of the Jim Crow era.

Same-sex marriage

gay marriagemarriage equalitysame sex marriage
Before the passage of Proposition 8, California was only the second U.S. state (after Massachusetts) to allow same-sex marriage.
They are also available in parts of the United States (California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, Nevada and Oregon).

In re Marriage Cases

rules a previous ban unconstitutionaldecisiondeclared same-sex marriage legal
The state first issued marriage licenses to same-sex couples June 16, 2008 as a result of the Supreme Court of California finding in In re Marriage Cases that barring same-sex couples from marriage violated the state's Constitution.
The court found that two statutes barring same-sex marriage in California, one enacted in 1977 by the legislature and the other in 2000 by state voters (Proposition 22), were unconstitutional.

William J. Knight

Pete KnightWilliam "Pete" KnightWilliam J. "Pete" Knight
Proposition 22 was authored by State Senator William J. Knight, and the measure was dubbed the "Knight initiative" in an attempt to link it to the failed "Briggs Initiative" (Proposition 6 of 1978) that would have banned gays and lesbians from working as teachers in California's public schools.
On March 9, 2004, Knight's son, David Knight, who is gay, married his partner during the period when San Francisco performed same-sex marriages in defiance of state law.

2000 California Proposition 22

Proposition 22California Proposition 22California Proposition 22 (2000)
The next day, September 7, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger indicated he would veto the bill, citing Proposition 22, which had passed with the approval of a majority of voters five years earlier.

2008 California Proposition 8

Proposition 8California Proposition 8Prop 8
The issuance of such licenses was halted from November 5, 2008 through June 27, 2013 (though existing same-sex marriages continued to be valid) due to the passage of Proposition 8—a state constitutional amendment barring same-sex marriages.
The proposition was created by opponents of same-sex marriage in advance of the California Supreme Court's May 2008 appeal ruling, In re Marriage Cases, which followed the short-lived 2004 same-sex weddings controversy and found the previous ban on same-sex marriage (Proposition 22, 2000) unconstitutional.

Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon

Del MartinPhyllis LyonPhyllis Lyon and Del Martin
They married again on June 16, 2008, in the first same-sex wedding to take place in San Francisco after the California Supreme Court's decision in In re Marriage Cases legalized same-sex marriage in California.

Hollingsworth v. Perry

Perry v. SchwarzeneggerPerry v. Brownfederal trial
The granting of same-sex marriages recommenced following the United States Supreme Court decision in Hollingsworth v. Perry, which restored the effect of a federal district court ruling that overturned Proposition 8 as unconstitutional.
The effect of the ruling was that same-sex marriage in California resumed under the district court trial decision from 2010.

Ronald M. George

Ronald George
The opinion, written by Chief Justice Ronald M. George, cited the Court's 1948 decision in Perez v. Sharp where the state's interracial marriage ban was held unconstitutional.
In 2008, Justice George authored the opinion in the Supreme Court's 4-3 ruling in In re Marriage Cases legalizing same-sex marriage in California.

Richard Kramer (judge)

Richard KramerRichard A. Kramer
Eventually, all six cases were coordinated (In re Marriage Cases) and assigned to San Francisco Superior Court Judge Richard Kramer.

Kamala Harris

HarrisKamala D. HarrisKamala Devi Harris
California Attorney General Kamala Harris, however, issued an analysis that the district court's injunction applies statewide and binds upon all 58 of California's counties based on the interpretation of California Supreme Court's decision in Lockyer v. City and County of San Francisco, stating that county clerks are state officials under supervision of Department of Public Health for the limited purpose of issuing marriage licenses and are thus bound by the injunction.
During her tenure as California Attorney General, Harris declined to defend the state's ban on same-sex marriage in court.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Same-sex marriage is legal in the U.S. state of California.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
Before the passage of Proposition 8, California was only the second U.S. state (after Massachusetts) to allow same-sex marriage. Same-sex marriage is legal in the U.S. state of California.

Marriage license

marriage licencemarriage licenseslicense
The state first issued marriage licenses to same-sex couples June 16, 2008 as a result of the Supreme Court of California finding in In re Marriage Cases that barring same-sex couples from marriage violated the state's Constitution.

Same-sex relationship

same-sex couplessame-sex couplesame-sex relationships
The state first issued marriage licenses to same-sex couples June 16, 2008 as a result of the Supreme Court of California finding in In re Marriage Cases that barring same-sex couples from marriage violated the state's Constitution.

Constitutional amendment

amendmentamendmentsconstitutional reform
The issuance of such licenses was halted from November 5, 2008 through June 27, 2013 (though existing same-sex marriages continued to be valid) due to the passage of Proposition 8—a state constitutional amendment barring same-sex marriages.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The granting of same-sex marriages recommenced following the United States Supreme Court decision in Hollingsworth v. Perry, which restored the effect of a federal district court ruling that overturned Proposition 8 as unconstitutional.

United States district court

U.S. District Courtfederal district courtdistrict court
The granting of same-sex marriages recommenced following the United States Supreme Court decision in Hollingsworth v. Perry, which restored the effect of a federal district court ruling that overturned Proposition 8 as unconstitutional.

Chief judge

presiding judgePresiding JusticeSenior Circuit Judge
On August 4, 2010, United States District Court Chief Judge Vaughn Walker declared Proposition 8 a violation of the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the U.S. Constitution in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, a decision upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on February 7, 2012.

Due process

due process of lawDue Process Clausejudicial procedure
On August 4, 2010, United States District Court Chief Judge Vaughn Walker declared Proposition 8 a violation of the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the U.S. Constitution in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, a decision upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on February 7, 2012.

Equal Protection Clause

equal protectionequal protection of the lawsEqual Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment
On August 4, 2010, United States District Court Chief Judge Vaughn Walker declared Proposition 8 a violation of the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the U.S. Constitution in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, a decision upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on February 7, 2012.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
On August 4, 2010, United States District Court Chief Judge Vaughn Walker declared Proposition 8 a violation of the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the U.S. Constitution in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, a decision upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on February 7, 2012.