Samson

SampsonShimshonSamson and Delilahancient namesakeAss jawbiblical figurebiblical story of Samsonbiblical strongmanfigure of the same namehero
Samson (, Shimshon, "man of the sun") was the last of the judges of the ancient Israelites mentioned in the Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible (chapters 13 to 16) and one of the last of the leaders who "judged" Israel before the institution of the monarchy.wikipedia
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Delilah

Samson and DelilahDalilaDelila
Samson was betrayed by his lover Delilah, who ordered a servant to cut his hair while he was sleeping and turned him over to his Philistine enemies, who gouged out his eyes and forced him to grind grain in a mill at Gaza.
She is loved by Samson, a Nazirite who possesses great strength and serves as the final Judge of Israel.

Long hair

longlong-hairedhair length
However, if Samson's long hair was cut, then his Nazirite vow would be violated and he would lose his strength.
Similarly, religious men with long hair include the Nazarites of the Hebrew Bible (Samson being a famous example) and the Sikhs.

Gaza City

GazaGazanGaza District
Samson was betrayed by his lover Delilah, who ordered a servant to cut his hair while he was sleeping and turned him over to his Philistine enemies, who gouged out his eyes and forced him to grind grain in a mill at Gaza.
According to the Book of Judges, Gaza was the place where Samson was imprisoned by the Philistines and met his death.

Samson Agonistes

Notable depictions of Samson include John Milton's closet drama Samson Agonistes and Cecil B. DeMille's 1949 Hollywood film Samson and Delilah.
Samson Agonistes (from Greek Σαμσών ἀγωνιστής, "Samson the champion") is a tragic closet drama by John Milton.

Samson in rabbinic literature

rabbinic
Samson has been the subject of both rabbinic and Christian commentary, with some Christians viewing him as a type of Jesus, based on similarities between their lives.
Allusions in rabbinic literature to the Biblical character Samson, the ancient Israelite hero who fought the Philistines with supernatural strength, contain various expansions, elaborations and inferences beyond what is presented in the text of the Bible itself.

Samson and Delilah (1949 film)

Samson and Delilah19491949 film
Notable depictions of Samson include John Milton's closet drama Samson Agonistes and Cecil B. DeMille's 1949 Hollywood film Samson and Delilah.
It depicts the biblical story of Samson, a strongman whose secret lies in his uncut hair, and his love for Delilah, the woman who seduces him, discovers his secret, and then betrays him to the Philistines.

Samson's riddle

a riddleout of the strong came forth sweetness,riddle
At the wedding feast, Samson told a riddle to his thirty groomsmen (all Philistines).
Samson's riddle is a riddle that appears in the biblical narrative about Samson.

Timnah

Tel BatashTimnathKhirbet Tibneh
He fell in love with a Philistine woman from Timnah, whom he decided to marry, ignoring the objections of his parents over the fact that she was non-Israelite.
Timnath or Timnah was a Philistine city in Canaan that is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible in and in connection with Samson.

Book of Judges

JudgesThe Book of JudgesShofetim
Samson (, Shimshon, "man of the sun") was the last of the judges of the ancient Israelites mentioned in the Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible (chapters 13 to 16) and one of the last of the leaders who "judged" Israel before the institution of the monarchy.

Rock of Etam

the Rock Etam
Samson then took refuge in a cave in the rock of Etam.
Rock of Etam is mentioned as a rock with the cave where Samson hid after smiting the Philistines "hip and thigh with a great slaughter."

Philistines

PhilistinePhilistiaPeleset
The biblical account states that Samson was a Nazirite, and that he was given immense strength to aid him against his enemies and allow him to perform superhuman feats, including slaying a lion with his bare hands and massacring an entire army of Philistines using only the jawbone of a donkey.
On the basis of the LXX's regular translation into "allophyloi", Robert Drews states that the term "Philistines" means simply "non-Israelites of the Promised Land" when used in the context of Samson, Saul and David.

Manoah

her husband
Manoah was an Israelite from Zorah, descended from the Danites, and his wife had been unable to conceive.
Manoah and his wife were the parents of famous judge Samson.

Wife of Manoah

his wifeSamson's motherhis mother
Manoah was an Israelite from Zorah, descended from the Danites, and his wife had been unable to conceive.
She later gives birth to Samson.

Biblical judges

JudgesjudgeBiblical judge
Samson (, Shimshon, "man of the sun") was the last of the judges of the ancient Israelites mentioned in the Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible (chapters 13 to 16) and one of the last of the leaders who "judged" Israel before the institution of the monarchy.
The Book of Judges mentions twelve leaders who judged Israel: Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar, Deborah, Gideon, Tola, Jair, Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon, and Samson.

Dagon

DaganDāganMarnas
When the Philistines took Samson into their temple of Dagon, Samson asked to rest against one of the support pillars; after being granted permission, he prayed to God and miraculously recovered his strength, allowing him to grasp hold of the columns and tear them down, killing himself and all the Philistines with him.
In the Hebrew Bible, Dagon is particularly the god of the Philistines with temples at Beth-dagon in the tribe of Asher (Joshua 19.27), in Gaza (Judges 16.23, which tells soon after how the temple is destroyed by Samson as his last act).

Tribe of Dan

DanDaniteCamp of Dan
Manoah was an Israelite from Zorah, descended from the Danites, and his wife had been unable to conceive.
The most celebrated Danite was Samson, a Danaite judge from the period of settlement in the lands allotted by Joshua.

Zorah

ZoraZoreah, Zorah
Manoah was an Israelite from Zorah, descended from the Danites, and his wife had been unable to conceive.
Zorah has been identified with the biblical Zoreah, and is the birthplace of Samson.

Nazirite

NazariteNazaritesNazirites
The biblical account states that Samson was a Nazirite, and that he was given immense strength to aid him against his enemies and allow him to perform superhuman feats, including slaying a lion with his bare hands and massacring an entire army of Philistines using only the jawbone of a donkey.
Two examples of nazirites in the Hebrew Bible are Samson (Judges 13:5), and Samuel (1 Samuel 1:11).

Samuel

Prophet SamuelSamuel (Bible)Samuel the Prophet
Rabbinic literature identifies Samson with Bedan, a Judge mentioned by Samuel in his farewell address among the Judges who delivered Israel from their enemies.
He had assumed the leadership after Samson's death.

John Milton

MiltonMiltonicMiltonian
Notable depictions of Samson include John Milton's closet drama Samson Agonistes and Cecil B. DeMille's 1949 Hollywood film Samson and Delilah.
The Garden of Eden may allegorically reflect Milton's view of England's recent Fall from Grace, while Samson's blindness and captivity—mirroring Milton's own lost sight—may be a metaphor for England's blind acceptance of Charles II as king.

Nahal Sorek

Sorek ValleySorekWadi al-Sarar
In some Jewish traditions, Samson is believed to have been buried in Tel Tzora in Israel overlooking the Sorek valley.
Nahal Sorek was the place where Delilah lived, and Samson came to meet her for the first time.

Tel Tzora

Tel Tzora/ Tzar'a/ Tsar'a
In some Jewish traditions, Samson is believed to have been buried in Tel Tzora in Israel overlooking the Sorek valley.
Nearby is the well-known tourist attraction regarded by many as the location of Samson's tomb.

Bedan

Rabbinic literature identifies Samson with Bedan, a Judge mentioned by Samuel in his farewell address among the Judges who delivered Israel from their enemies.
Bishop Simon Patrick and others (including the Talmud ) hypothesis the name to be a contraction of ben Dan ("the son of Dan") by which they suppose Samson is meant, as the Targum reads.

Naso (parsha)

NasoNaso parshaNasso
They named Hazelelponi as his mother in Numbers Rabbah Naso 10 and in Bava Batra 91a and stated that he had a sister named "Nishyan" or "Nashyan".
A person who said, "I vow to be like Samson," "the son of Manoah," "the husband of Delilah," or "the one who plucked up the gates of Gaza," or "the one whose eyes the Philistines put out," became a nazirite like Samson (who was a nazirite for life).

Heracles

HeraklesHerculesAlcides
He is sometimes considered to be an Israelite version of the popular Near Eastern folk hero also embodied by the Sumerian Enkidu and the Greek Heracles.