Samuel Goldwyn

Sam GoldwynGoldwynSamuel GoldfishfatherGoldwyn CompanyGoldwyn StudiosGoldwynismsinclude us outSam GoldfishSam Goldwyn Productions
Samuel Goldwyn (born Szmuel Gelbfisz; שמואל געלבפֿיש; c. July, 1879 – January 31, 1974), also known as Samuel Goldfish, was a Polish-American film producer.wikipedia
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Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award

Cecil B. DeMille AwardCecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement AwardCecil B DeMille Award
His awards include the 1973 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1947, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1958.
The oldest honoree was producer Samuel Goldwyn, at age 93 in 1973.

Paramount Pictures

ParamountParamount StudiosParamount Home Entertainment
In 1914, Paramount was a film exchange and exhibition corporation headed by W. W. Hodkinson.
That same year, another aspiring producer, Jesse L. Lasky, opened his Lasky Feature Play Company with money borrowed from his brother-in-law, Samuel Goldfish, later known as Samuel Goldwyn.

Film studio

movie studiostudiofilm studios
He was most well known for being the founding contributor and executive of several motion picture studios in Hollywood.
The Big Five's ownership of movie theaters was eventually opposed by eight independent producers, including Samuel Goldwyn, David O. Selznick, Walt Disney, Hal Roach, and Walter Wanger.

Cecil B. DeMille

Cecil B. De MilleDeMilleCecil DeMille
In 1913, Goldfish, along with his brother-in-law Jesse L. Lasky, Cecil B. DeMille, and Arthur Friend formed a partnership, The Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company, to produce feature-length motion pictures.
In July 1913 DeMille, Jesse Lasky, Sam Goldfish (later Samuel Goldwyn), and a group of East Coast businessmen created the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company.

Samuel Goldwyn Productions

Samuel GoldwynSamuel Goldwyn Prod.Goldwyn
Before the sale and merger of Goldwyn Pictures in April 1924, Goldwyn had established Samuel Goldwyn Productions in 1923 as a production-only operation (with no distribution arm).
Samuel Goldwyn Productions was an American film production company founded by Samuel Goldwyn in 1923, and active through 1959.

Leo the Lion (MGM)

Leo the LionMGM lionJackie
Goldwyn Pictures proved successful but it is their "Leo the Lion" trademark for which the organization is most famous.
Since 1916 (and when the studio was formed by the merger of Samuel Goldwyn's studio with Marcus Loew's Metro Pictures and Louis B. Mayer's company in 1924), there have been seven different lions used for the MGM logo.

Goldwyn Pictures

GoldwynGoldwyn Pictures CorporationGoldwyn Company
In 1916, Goldfish partnered with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn, using a combination of both names to call their movie-making enterprise Goldwyn Pictures.
Goldwyn Pictures Corporation was founded on November 19, 1916 by Samuel Goldfish partnering with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn using an amalgamation of both last names to create the name.

Jesse L. Lasky

Jesse LaskyLaskyJesse L. Lasky Company
In 1913, Goldfish, along with his brother-in-law Jesse L. Lasky, Cecil B. DeMille, and Arthur Friend formed a partnership, The Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company, to produce feature-length motion pictures.
Lasky's sister, Blanche, married Samuel Goldwyn and in 1913 Lasky and Goldwyn teamed with Cecil B. DeMille and Oscar Apfel to form the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company.

Frances Howard (actress)

Frances HowardFrancesFrances Goldwyn
Some of the early productions bear the name "Howard Productions", named for Goldwyn's wife, Frances.
She was the second wife of Academy Award-winning producer Samuel Goldwyn, and the paternal grandmother of actors Tony and John Goldwyn.

Archibald Selwyn

ArchieArchibald
In 1916, Goldfish partnered with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn, using a combination of both names to call their movie-making enterprise Goldwyn Pictures.
Sam Goldfish joined Edgar and Archibald Selwyn in 1916 to form Goldwyn Pictures.

Independent film

independentindieindie film
During that time, Goldwyn made numerous films and reigned as the most successful independent producer in the US. Many of his films were forgettable; his collaboration with John Ford, however, resulted in Best Picture Oscar nomination for Arrowsmith (1931).
Within a few years, ambitious men like Samuel Goldwyn, Carl Laemmle, Adolph Zukor, Louis B. Mayer, and the Warner Brothers (Harry, Albert, Samuel, and Jack) had switched to the production side of the business.

Wuthering Heights (1939 film)

Wuthering Heights1939 film adaptation1939
William Wyler was responsible for most of Goldwyn's highly lauded films, with Best Picture Oscar nominations for Dodsworth (1936), Dead End (1937), Wuthering Heights (1939), The Little Foxes (1941) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946).
Wuthering Heights is a 1939 American drama romance film directed by William Wyler and produced by Samuel Goldwyn.

William Wyler

WylerWillie Wyler
William Wyler was responsible for most of Goldwyn's highly lauded films, with Best Picture Oscar nominations for Dodsworth (1936), Dead End (1937), Wuthering Heights (1939), The Little Foxes (1941) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). William Wyler directed many of his most celebrated productions, and he hired writers such as Ben Hecht, Sidney Howard, Dorothy Parker, and Lillian Hellman.
After leaving Universal he began a long collaboration with Samuel Goldwyn for whom he directed such classics as Dodsworth (1936), These Three (1936), Dead End (1937), Wuthering Heights (1939), The Westerner (1940), The Little Foxes (1941) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946).

Ben Hecht

Hecht, BenBenbook list
William Wyler directed many of his most celebrated productions, and he hired writers such as Ben Hecht, Sidney Howard, Dorothy Parker, and Lillian Hellman.
According to Samuel Goldwyn biographer, Carol Easton, in 1931, with his writing partner Charles MacArthur, he "knocked out The Unholy Garden in twelve hours. Hecht subsequently received a fan letter from producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr.:

The Best Years of Our Lives

Best Years of Our Lives, The
William Wyler was responsible for most of Goldwyn's highly lauded films, with Best Picture Oscar nominations for Dodsworth (1936), Dead End (1937), Wuthering Heights (1939), The Little Foxes (1941) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). In 1946, the year he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, Goldwyn's drama, The Best Years of Our Lives, starring Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Teresa Wright and Dana Andrews, won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
Samuel Goldwyn was inspired to produce a film about veterans after reading an August 7, 1944, article in Time about the difficulties experienced by men returning to civilian life.

Gloversville, New York

GloversvilleCity of GloversvilleGloversville, New York, USA
He found work in upstate Gloversville, New York in the bustling garment business.
In 1899, the Hollywood producer Samuel Goldwyn immigrated from Poland through England to Canada, walked through snow into the United States at an unmanned border point in rural Maine, eventually making his way to Gloversville, where he worked as a glove maker and commissioned salesman for the Elite Glove Company.

United Artists

UAUnited Artists Media GroupUnited Artists Pictures
Throughout the 1930s, he released all his films through United Artists, but beginning in 1941, and continuing almost through the end of his career, Goldwyn released his films through RKO Radio Pictures.
Contracts were signed with independent producers, including Samuel Goldwyn, and Howard Hughes.

Potash and Perlmutter

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Their first feature was Potash and Perlmutter, released in September 1923 through First National Pictures.
This film is notable as the first production of Samuel Goldwyn's independent production company.

Musical film

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In the 1950s Samuel Goldwyn turned to making a number of musicals including the 1952 hit Hans Christian Andersen (his last with Danny Kaye, with whom he had made many others), and the 1955 hit Guys and Dolls starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra, and Vivian Blaine, which was based on the equally successful Broadway musical.
Historian Scott Eyman wrote, "As the film ended and applause grew with the houselights, Sam Goldwyn's wife Frances looked around at the celebrities in the crowd. She saw 'terror in all their faces', she said, as if they knew that 'the game they had been playing for years was finally over'."

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

Irving G. Thalberg AwardIrving G. Thalberg AwardsIrving Thalberg Award
His awards include the 1973 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1947, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1958. In 1946, the year he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, Goldwyn's drama, The Best Years of Our Lives, starring Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Teresa Wright and Dana Andrews, won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
Samuel Goldwyn

Warsaw

WarszawaWarsaw, Polandcapital of Poland
Goldwyn was born Szmuel Gelbfisz in Warsaw to Polish Jewish Hasidic parents, Aaron Dawid Gelbfisz (1852–1895), a peddler, and his wife, Hanna Reban (née Jarecka; 1855–1924).
Other notables include Samuel Goldwyn, the founder of Goldwyn Pictures, mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot, physicist Joseph Rotblat and biochemist Casimir Funk.

Dana Andrews

Andrews
In 1946, the year he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, Goldwyn's drama, The Best Years of Our Lives, starring Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Teresa Wright and Dana Andrews, won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
Andrews signed a contract with Samuel Goldwyn, and nine years after arriving in Los Angeles was offered his first movie role in Lucky Cisco Kid (1940) at 20th Century Fox.

Teresa Wright

In 1946, the year he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, Goldwyn's drama, The Best Years of Our Lives, starring Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Teresa Wright and Dana Andrews, won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
It was there that she was discovered by Samuel Goldwyn, who came to see her in the show she had been appearing in for almost a year.

Danny Kaye

The Danny Kaye ShowAn Hour with Danny KayeDanny Kaye Show
In the 1950s Samuel Goldwyn turned to making a number of musicals including the 1952 hit Hans Christian Andersen (his last with Danny Kaye, with whom he had made many others), and the 1955 hit Guys and Dolls starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra, and Vivian Blaine, which was based on the equally successful Broadway musical.
His feature-film debut was in producer Samuel Goldwyn's Technicolor 1944 comedy Up in Arms, a remake of Goldwyn's Eddie Cantor comedy Whoopee! (1930).

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

MGMMGM Studiosmgm.com
Despite the inclusion of his name, Goldwyn had no role in the management or production at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
When Samuel Goldwyn left he sued over the use of his name.