Samuel L. Howard

United States Marine Corps general who served with distinction in the Marine Corps for thirty-eight years.

- Samuel L. Howard

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Bataan Death March

The forcible transfer by the Imperial Japanese Army of 60,000–80,000 American and Filipino prisoners of war from Saysain Point, Bagac, Bataan and Mariveles to Camp O'Donnell, Capas, Tarlac, via San Fernando, Pampanga, the prisoners being forced to march despite many dying on the journey.

A burial detail of American and Filipino prisoners of war uses improvised litters to carry fallen comrades at Camp O'Donnell, Capas, Tarlac, 1942, following the Bataan Death March.
General King discusses surrender terms with Japanese officers to end the Battle of Bataan
Route of the death march. The section from San Fernando to Capas was by rail cars.
Prisoners photographed during the march. They have their hands tied behind their backs. They are left to right:PVt Samuel Stenzler {d.May 1942); Pvt Frank Spears (killed June 1945); Capt John McDonnell Gallagher who died Shortly after this picture was taken 9 April 1942
Portion of Bataan disinterment map highlighting the site of the Panintingan massacre
Fallen soldiers during the Death March
News of the Bataan Death March sparked outrage in the US, as reflected in this propaganda poster.
Newspapers in a Hayward, California newsstand, after the fall of Bataan
Japanese War Crimes Trials in Manila, 1945
Bataan Death March Memorial featuring Filipino and American soldiers at the Veterans Memorial Park in Las Cruces, New Mexico
The 2013 Bataan Memorial Death March at the White Sands Missile Range

Samuel L. Howard

Battle of Corregidor

The culmination of the Japanese campaign for the conquest of the Commonwealth of the Philippines during World War II.

Victorious Japanese troops atop the Hearn Battery, May 6, 1942.
Mortars at Corregidor's Battery Way could be rotated to fire in any direction
3-inch antiaircraft gun M3 on Corregidor
Map of Corregidor island in 1941
The Allied command center inside Malinta Tunnel
Japanese landings on Corregidor, 5–6 May 1942
Japanese artillery in action against Corregidor
Japanese troops landing on Corregidor
Surrender of American troops at Corregidor
American and Filipino prisoners, captured at Corregidor, arrive at Bilibid prison by foot and truck as Japanese look on. Taken on May 25, 1942.
Japanese soldiers take down the American Flag at the Old Spanish Flagpole in Corregidor Island

After their evacuation from Olongapo in Zambales, close to Subic Naval Base on December 26, the 4th Marine Regiment—under the command of Col. Samuel L. Howard—became the primary fighting unit on the island.

Order of the Cloud and Banner

Military award of the Republic of China.

Samuel L. Howard

DeWitt Peck

Decorated officer of the United States Marine Corps with the rank of major general, who served as the 18th Assistant to the Major General Commandant of the Marine Corps during World War II.

Major General DeWitt Peck, USMC
Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN, CINCPAC, is shown with some of his staff officers and others at Guadalcanal Airfield, 30 September 1942. L to R: Commander Compton (Eng. Off. In SUBDIV 20), Brigadier General DeWitt Peck, USMC, Captain W.M. Callaghan, USN, Lieutenant H.A. Lamar, USNR, Captain John R. Redman, USN, Air Commo. Victor Goddard, RNZAF, Admiral Nimitz, Captain Ralph A. Ofstie, USN, Major General Alexander Vandegrift, USMC, Brigadier General Roy S. Geiger, USMC and Colonel Omar T. Pfeiffer, USMC.
Brigadier General Merritt A. Edson, Commanding General Service Command Fleet Marine Force Pacific, Major General DeWitt Peck (CG 1st Marine Division), Louis E. Woods (CG 1st Marine Aircraft Wing), Tientsin, September 1945.

Peck was subsequently relieved by Colonel Samuel L. Howard on May 13, 1941, and returned to Washington, D.C., where he was attached to the staff of the commander in chief, United States Fleet, Admiral Ernest King.

Operation Beleaguer

Major United States military operation led by Maj. Gen. Keller E. Rockey.

Marines in Tsingtao during Operation Beleaguer
A Marine Corps Grumman F7F-3N Tigercat at Peking's Nan Yuan Airfield in December 1945
USS Princeton (CV-37) off Tsingtao in 1948
A United States Navy Curtiss SC-1 Seahawk scout plane over Shanghai in 1948. This aircraft was assigned to the cruiser USS Duluth. It was transported through the streets of Shanghai and fitted with landing gear instead of its normal floats.
Marine F4U-4 Corsairs at Tsingtao in early 1948.
Gerald P. Pulley in Tsingtao in 1949.
Brigadier general Merritt A. Edson, Commanding General Service Command Fleet Marine Force Pacific, Major general DeWitt Peck (CG 1st Marine Division), Louis E. Woods (CG 1st Marine Aircraft Wing), Tientsin, September 1945.

Rockey was finally relieved of command on September 18, 1946, and replaced by Major General Samuel L. Howard, who would manage most of the withdrawal.

William W. Ashurst

Brigadier general in the United States Marine Corps, who was a last commander of the North China Marine Detachment.

Colonel Ashurst while in Japanese captivity

In this capacity, his direct superior was Samuel L. Howard, also a prisoner of war from the Battle of Corregidor.

Herman Nickerson Jr.

Highly decorated officer of the United States Marine Corps with the rank of lieutenant general.

Lieutenant general Herman Nickerson Jr., USMC
Nickerson as commanding officer, 7th Marines in Korea.
Nickerson and James M. Masters (center) welcome then-retired Chesty Puller to Camp Pendleton in 1962.
Nickerson receives his three-star flag during his promotion to lieutenant general by Commandant Leonard F. Chapman Jr., March 1968.
LTG Herman Nickerson Jr. (left) inspects Honor Guard at Camp Horn, III MAF headquarters in Da Nang accompanied by outgoing III MAF commander Lieutenant Robert E. Cushman Jr., 9 March 1969

After the dissolving of III Marine Amphibious Corps in June 1946, Nickerson was attached to the staff of 1st Marine Division under Major General Samuel L. Howard and served as Division Ordnance Officer and Division Legal Officer, respectively, until January 1947, when he was ordered back to the United States.

Philippines campaign (1941–1942)

From December 8, 1941, to May 8, 1942, the invasion of the Philippines by the Empire of Japan and the defense of the islands by United States and the Philippine Armies during World War II.

A burial detail of American and Filipino prisoners of war uses improvised litters to carry fallen comrades at Camp O'Donnell, Capas, Tarlac, 1942, following the Bataan Death March.
Advance Japanese landings in the Philippines December 8–20, 1941
Disposition of United States Army forces in the Philippines in December 1941
A map of Luzon Island showing Japanese landings and advances from December 8, 1941, to January 8, 1942
Withdrawal in the South, December 25–31, 1941
Generals Wainwright (left) and MacArthur
Situation on Bataan, January 8, 1942
California newspapers, April 9, 1942
Japanese bombers over Corregidor
Map of Corregidor island in 1941
U.S. and Filipino soldiers and sailors surrendering to Japanese forces at Corregidor
U.S. generals in a group photo with Japanese captors
Japanese troops conquered Bataan, Philippines in 1942
Group of American prisoners, May 1942
Manila newspaper announcing the fall of Bataan

As personnel were routinely transferred back to the United States or separated from the service, the regimental commander, Col. Samuel L. Howard, arranged unofficially for all replacements to be placed in the 1st Special Defense Battalion, based at Cavite.