Samuel Wilberforce

Bishop WilberforceWilberforceBishop Samuel WilberforceSamuelBishop of OxfordReginald WilberforceSoapy SamThe Bishop of OxfordUnclear; either Samuel Wilberforce
Samuel Wilberforce, FRS (7 September 1805 – 19 July 1873) was an English bishop in the Church of England, and the third son of William Wilberforce.wikipedia
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1860 Oxford evolution debate

Debate about evolution meeting of 1860A debate of Darwin's theory
He is probably best remembered today for his opposition to Charles Darwin's theory of evolution at a debate in 1860. He took part in the famous 1860 debate concerning evolution at a meeting of the British Association on 30 June.
Several prominent British scientists and philosophers participated, including Thomas Henry Huxley, Bishop Samuel Wilberforce, Benjamin Brodie, Joseph Dalton Hooker and Robert FitzRoy.

Benjamin Disraeli

DisraeliLord BeaconsfieldBenjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield
The nickname derives from a comment by Benjamin Disraeli that the bishop's manner was "unctuous, oleaginous, saponaceous".
Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford, spoke strongly against the measure and implied that Russell was paying off the Jews for helping elect him.

Henry Edward Manning

Cardinal ManningHenry ManningArchbishop Manning
The set of friends with whom he chiefly associated at Oxford—among them William Ewart Gladstone and Henry Manning—were sometimes named, on account of their exceptionally decorous conduct, the "Bethel Union"; but he was by no means averse to amusements, and specially delighted in hurdle jumping, nude running and hunting.
Manning married Caroline, John Sargent's daughter, on 7 November 1833, in a ceremony performed by the bride's brother-in-law, the Revd Samuel Wilberforce, later Bishop of Oxford and Winchester.

Robert Wilberforce

Robert Isaac WilberforceRobert
He was the younger brother of Robert Isaac Wilberforce.
On 27 March 1848, Robert Wilberforce and his brother Samuel joined the Canterbury Association.

William Wilberforce

WilberforceWilliam(William) Wilberforce
Samuel Wilberforce, FRS (7 September 1805 – 19 July 1873) was an English bishop in the Church of England, and the third son of William Wilberforce. He was the son of William Wilberforce, a major campaigner against the slave trade and slavery, and Barbara Spooner.
1802), Samuel (b.

Charles Darwin

DarwinDarwinianCharles Robert Darwin
He is probably best remembered today for his opposition to Charles Darwin's theory of evolution at a debate in 1860. Richard Owen and Thomas Henry Huxley had already clashed on man's position in nature two days previously; on the Saturday, at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Wilberforce got his chance to criticise Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, especially the implication that humans and various species of apes share common ancestors.
The most famous confrontation was at the public 1860 Oxford evolution debate during a meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, where the Bishop of Oxford Samuel Wilberforce, though not opposed to transmutation of species, argued against Darwin's explanation and human descent from apes.

Ripon College Cuddesdon

Cuddesdon CollegeCuddesdon Theological CollegeCuddesdon
In 1854, he opened a theological college at Cuddesdon, now known as Ripon College Cuddesdon, which was afterwards the subject of some controversy on account of its alleged Romanist tendencies.
Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford, founded Cuddesdon College in April 1853, as the Oxford Diocesan Seminary to train graduates from Oxford and Cambridge.

Barbara Wilberforce

Barbara SpoonerBarbara Spooner WilberforceBarbara Ann Spooner
He was the son of William Wilberforce, a major campaigner against the slave trade and slavery, and Barbara Spooner.
The children were William (July 1798), Barbara (1799), Elizabeth (1801), Robert (1802), Samuel (1805), and Henry (1807).

British Science Association

British Association for the Advancement of ScienceBritish AssociationBritish Science Festival
He took part in the famous 1860 debate concerning evolution at a meeting of the British Association on 30 June.
One of the most famous events linked to the Association Meeting was an exchange between Thomas Henry Huxley and Bishop Samuel Wilberforce in 1860 (see the 1860 Oxford evolution debate).

Bampton Lectures

Bampton lecturerBampton LectureBampton lectureship
In 1841, he was chosen as the Bampton lecturer and was shortly afterwards made chaplain to Prince Albert, an appointment he owed to the impression produced by a speech at an anti-slavery meeting some months previously.

St Mary's Church, Brighstone

St. Mary's Church, BrighstoneSt Mary the Virgin ChurchSt Mary the Virgin's Church
In 1830, Wilberforce was presented by Charles Sumner, Bishop of Winchester, to the rectory of St. Mary's Church, Brighstone, in the Isle of Wight.

Albert, Prince Consort

Prince AlbertPrince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and GothaPrince Consort
In 1841, he was chosen as the Bampton lecturer and was shortly afterwards made chaplain to Prince Albert, an appointment he owed to the impression produced by a speech at an anti-slavery meeting some months previously.
His espousal of science met with clerical opposition; he and Palmerston unsuccessfully recommended a knighthood for Charles Darwin, after the publication of On the Origin of Species, which was opposed by the Bishop of Oxford.

John Sargent (priest)

John SargentSargent, John
After his marriage on 11 June 1828 to Emily Sargent, daughter of John Sargent, he was in December ordained to the Church of England and appointed curate-in-charge at Checkendon, near Henley-on-Thames.

Bloxham School

Bloxham ProjectAll Saints' School, BloxhamAll Saints School
Wilberforce was the patron of Philip Reginald Egerton, who founded Bloxham School in Oxfordshire.
The school was supported by Samuel Wilberforce who commissioned the diocesan architect, George Edmund Street, to draw up plans for the new school buildings.

Richard Wilberforce, Baron Wilberforce

Lord WilberforceRichard WilberforceWilberforce, Richard
Reginald was grandfather (through his fourth son, Samuel (Samuel Wilberforce (judge)) to Richard Lord Wilberforce, a Lord of Appeal.
His great-grandfather was Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Winchester, and his great-great-grandfather was the abolitionist William Wilberforce, a connection which had much influence upon him.

Archdeacon of Surrey

archdeaconry of SurreySurreyof Surrey
In November 1839 he was installed archdeacon of Surrey, in August 1840 was collated canon of Winchester and in October he accepted the rectory of Alverstoke.

Ernest Wilberforce

Ernest Roland WilberforceErnestBishop of Chichester
Ernest (1840–1908) was Bishop of Newcastle-upon-Tyne from 1882 to 1895, and Bishop of Chichester from 1895 till his death.
The third son of another bishop, Samuel Wilberforce, and his wife, Emily Sargent (1807–1841) — as well as the grandson of William Wilberforce, leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade — Ernest was born at his father's rectory, and grew up in Lavington and Cuddesdon, there gaining a love of country sports which lasted his whole life.

Thomas Henry Huxley

Thomas HuxleyHuxleyT. H. Huxley
Richard Owen and Thomas Henry Huxley had already clashed on man's position in nature two days previously; on the Saturday, at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Wilberforce got his chance to criticise Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, especially the implication that humans and various species of apes share common ancestors.
The stories regarding Huxley's famous debate in 1860 with Samuel Wilberforce were a key moment in the wider acceptance of evolution and in his own career, although historians think that the surviving story of the debate is a later fabrication.

Dean of Westminster

DeanDean of Westminster AbbeyDeanery of Westminster
In March 1845 he accepted the position of Dean of Westminster and, in October the same year, was appointed as the Bishop of Oxford.

Philip Egerton (priest)

Philip Reginald EgertonPhilip EgertonRev PR Edgerton
Wilberforce was the patron of Philip Reginald Egerton, who founded Bloxham School in Oxfordshire.
In 1855 he entered Cuddesdon Theological College, founded two years earlier by Bishop Wilberforce, to train as a priest.

Oxford University Museum of Natural History

Oxford University MuseumHope Department of EntomologyUniversity Museum
Richard Owen and Thomas Henry Huxley had already clashed on man's position in nature two days previously; on the Saturday, at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Wilberforce got his chance to criticise Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, especially the implication that humans and various species of apes share common ancestors.
The biologist Thomas Huxley and Samuel Wilberforce, the Bishop of Oxford, are generally cast as the main protagonists in the debate.

Basil Wilberforce

BasilAlbert WilberforceArchdeacon Wilberforce
Basil (1841–1916) was appointed canon residentiary of Westminster in 1894, chaplain of the House of Commons in 1896 and Archdeacon of Westminster in 1900; he published several volumes of sermons.
Born in Winchester as the younger son of Samuel Wilberforce (and therefore grandson of famed abolitionist William Wilberforce; his elder brother Ernest became Bishop of Newcastle then of Chichester), he was educated at Eton College and Exeter College, Oxford and ordained in 1866.

Bishop of Oxford

OxfordThe Bishop of OxfordBishopric of Oxford
In March 1845 he accepted the position of Dean of Westminster and, in October the same year, was appointed as the Bishop of Oxford.

Alverstoke

Alverstoke, HampshireAngleseyville
In November 1839 he was installed archdeacon of Surrey, in August 1840 was collated canon of Winchester and in October he accepted the rectory of Alverstoke.

Chancellor of the Order of the Garter

ChancellorChancellor of that OrderChancellor of the Order
As such, he was also ex officio the Chancellor of the Order of the Garter.