San Francisco Symphony

San FranciscoSan Francisco Symphony OrchestraSan Francisco Symphony Orchestra & ChorusBlack and White BallorchestraSan Francisco Opera Orchestra and ChorusSan Francisco SymphoniesSan Francisco Symphony & Chorus
The San Francisco Symphony (SFS), founded in 1911, is an American orchestra based in San Francisco, California.wikipedia
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San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra

Agnes AlbertAlumni and Friends of the San Francisco Youth Symphony
The San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra (founded in 1981) and the San Francisco Symphony Chorus (1972) are part of the organization.
The San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra (SFSYO) is the youth orchestra of the San Francisco Symphony and a key element of the symphony's community outreach and education programs.

San Francisco Symphony Chorus

ChorusSan Francisco Symphony Chorus.
The San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra (founded in 1981) and the San Francisco Symphony Chorus (1972) are part of the organization.
The San Francisco Symphony Chorus is the resident chorus of the San Francisco Symphony (SFS).

Esa-Pekka Salonen

SalonenEsa Pekka SalonenEsa Pekka-Salonen
Tilson Thomas is scheduled to conclude his tenure as the orchestra's music director in 2020, when Esa-Pekka Salonen is scheduled to become the orchestra's next music director.
He is principal conductor and artistic advisor of the Philharmonia Orchestra in London, conductor laureate of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and music director-designate of the San Francisco Symphony.

Michael Tilson Thomas

Michael (Tilson Thomas)Michael Tilson-ThomasMTT
Since 1995, Michael Tilson Thomas has been the orchestra's music director.
He is currently music director of the San Francisco Symphony, and artistic director of the New World Symphony, an American orchestral academy based in Miami Beach, Florida.

The Standard Hour

Hertz also led the orchestra during a number of radio broadcasts, including on The Standard Hour, a weekly concert series sponsored by Standard Oil of California.
The Standard Hour, also known as The Standard Symphony Hour, was a weekly radio broadcast by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and the San Francisco Opera first heard in 1926.

Pierre Monteux

MonteuxMonteux, Pierre
Pierre Monteux (1875–1964) was subsequently hired to restore the orchestra.
He led the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1919–24), Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra (1924–34), Orchestre Symphonique de Paris (1929–38) and San Francisco Symphony (1936–52).

Seiji Ozawa

OzawaOzawa Seiji
He also paved the way for his successor when he invited Seiji Ozawa to guest conduct the orchestra; Ozawa impressed critics and audiences with his fiery Bernstein-like conducting, particularly in the performances of the Mussorgsky-Ravel Pictures at an Exhibition, the Tchaikovsky Fourth Symphony, and Symphonie Fantastique by Hector Berlioz.
Seiji Ozawa is a Japanese conductor known for his advocacy of modern composers and for his work with the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Alexander Barantschik

He recruited London Symphony Orchestra leader Alexander Barantschik to become SFS concertmaster.
Alexander Barantschik (born 1953) joined the San Francisco Symphony as Concertmaster in September 2001, having served as Concertmaster of the London Symphony Orchestra and Netherlands Radio Philharmonic.

Keeping Score

In 2006, the San Francisco Symphony launched Keeping Score – MTT on Music, a series of projects comprising audio-visual performances for DVD and broadcast on PBS's Great Performances, multimedia websites, and educational programs for schools.
Keeping Score is the San Francisco Symphony’s multi-year program designed to make classical music more accessible to people of all ages and musical backgrounds through television, the web, radio, DVDs, and in the classroom.

Josef Krips

In the fall of 1963, Josef Krips (1902–1974) became music director.
Leaving the Buffalo Philharmonic in 1963, Krips served as the Music Director of the San Francisco Symphony from 1963 to 1970.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
The San Francisco Symphony (SFS), founded in 1911, is an American orchestra based in San Francisco, California.
The War Memorial Opera House houses the San Francisco Opera, the second-largest opera company in North America as well as the San Francisco Ballet, while the San Francisco Symphony plays in Davies Symphony Hall.

Henry Kimball Hadley

Henry Hadley
The orchestra's first concerts were led by conductor-composer Henry Hadley.
In 1911, he became the first conductor of the San Francisco Symphony.

Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall

Davies Symphony HallDavies AuditoriumDavies Hall
Since 1980, the orchestra is resident at the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall in the City's Hayes Valley neighborhood.
The 2,743-seat hall was completed in 1980 at a cost of US$28 million to give the San Francisco Symphony a permanent home.

Masterworks Chorale

A highlight of de Waart's final season, 1984–85, was four sold-out performances of Mahler's eighth symphony, incorporating the Symphony Chorus, the Masterworks Chorale, the San Francisco Boys Chorus, and the San Francisco Girls Chorus.
In September 1984, Masterworks was one of four choirs chosen to participate in four performances of the Eighth Symphony of Gustav Mahler by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra under Edo de Waart in Davies Symphony Hall.

KKHI (defunct)

KKHIKKHI-FM
He did agree to allow KKHI to broadcast some of the Friday evening concerts.
KKHI quickly arranged to broadcast many of the Friday evening concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, usually when it was conducted by music director Josef Krips (1902-1974), in stereo from the War Memorial Opera House.

Edo de Waart

de Waart
Edo de Waart succeeded Ozawa in 1977.
De Waart made his début at the San Francisco Symphony in 1975.

Enrique Jordá

Enrique '''JordáJordá
In 1954, the board hired Enrique Jordá as music director.
After conducting in Madrid, Cape Town and Antwerp, he was music director of the San Francisco Symphony from 1954 to 1963.

San Francisco Boys Chorus

A highlight of de Waart's final season, 1984–85, was four sold-out performances of Mahler's eighth symphony, incorporating the Symphony Chorus, the Masterworks Chorale, the San Francisco Boys Chorus, and the San Francisco Girls Chorus.
Boys from the SFBC have regularly performed in productions of the San Francisco Opera and San Francisco Symphony.

Alfred Hertz

In 1915, Alfred Hertz succeeded Hadley.
He later became music director of the San Francisco Symphony, a post he held from 1915 to 1930, receiving praise and a cover story in Time for his leadership and accomplishments.

Victor Talking Machine Company

VictorVictor RecordsJVC
Hertz helped to refine the orchestra and arranged for the Victor Talking Machine Company to record it at their new studio in Oakland in early 1925.
The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra conducted by Alfred Hertz made a few acoustical recordings early in 1925, then switched to electrical recordings in Oakland and San Francisco, California, continuing until 1928.

Yehudi Menuhin

MenuhinSir Yehudi MenuhinYehudi
Some of the many soloists who have appeared with the orchestra include violinists Jascha Heifetz, Fritz Kreisler, Yehudi Menuhin, Midori, Itzhak Perlman, Isaac Stern, Joshua Bell, Gil Shaham, and Efrem Zimbalist; pianists Vladimir Horowitz, Horacio Gutierrez, Vladimir de Pachmann, Peter Serkin, Rudolf Serkin, Ruth Slenzynska, Patricia Benkman, Ozan Marsh, Yuja Wang, and André Watts; and organists Alexander Frey and Paul Jacobs.
His first public appearance, when he was seven years old, was as solo violinist with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra in 1923.

Issay Dobrowen

Dobrowen
After Hertz's retirement in 1930, two conductors, Basil Cameron and Issay Dobrowen, jointly headed the orchestra.
Dobrowen went on to conduct the Oslo Philharmonic orchestra (1928–31), at the Sofia Opera (1927–28), and the San Francisco Symphony (1931–34) and the Gothenburg Symphony (1941–53) orchestras.

Ferenc Fricsay

Fricsay
When Monteux left the orchestra in 1952, various conductors led the orchestra, including Leopold Stokowski, Georg Solti, Erich Leinsdorf, Karl Münchinger, George Szell, Bruno Walter, Ferenc Fricsay, and William Steinberg.
In 1953 he made his debuts in Paris, Milan, Lucerne, and the USA, where he conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra and San Francisco Symphony.

Isaac Stern

IsaacIsaac and Linda Stern FoundationIsaac Stern Auditorium
Some of the many soloists who have appeared with the orchestra include violinists Jascha Heifetz, Fritz Kreisler, Yehudi Menuhin, Midori, Itzhak Perlman, Isaac Stern, Joshua Bell, Gil Shaham, and Efrem Zimbalist; pianists Vladimir Horowitz, Horacio Gutierrez, Vladimir de Pachmann, Peter Serkin, Rudolf Serkin, Ruth Slenzynska, Patricia Benkman, Ozan Marsh, Yuja Wang, and André Watts; and organists Alexander Frey and Paul Jacobs.
At his public début on 18 February 1936, aged 15, he played Saint-Saëns' Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor with the San Francisco Symphony under the direction of Pierre Monteux.

George Gershwin

GershwinGeorgeG. Gershwin
In 1937, George Gershwin (1898–1937) conducted a suite from his opera Porgy and Bess, then was soloist in his Concerto in F and Rhapsody in Blue with Pierre Monteux conducting.
On February 11, 1937, he performed his Piano Concerto in F in a special concert of his music with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra under the direction of French maestro Pierre Monteux.