San Marco, Florence

San Marcomonastery of San MarcoBasilica di San MarcoBasilica di San Marco (Florence)Convent of San MarcoMuseum of San MarcoSt MarkBasilica of San MarcoChurchChurch of San Marco, Florence
San Marco is a religious complex in Florence, Italy.wikipedia
130 Related Articles

Florence

FlorentineFlorence, ItalyFirenze
San Marco is a religious complex in Florence, Italy.
During this period, the Dominican friar Girolamo Savonarola had become prior of the San Marco monastery in 1490.

Fra Angelico

Beato AngelicoAngelicoBlessed Fra Angelico
During the 15th century it was home to two famous Dominicans, the painter Fra Angelico and the preacher Girolamo Savonarola. These cells of the friars' dorter or dormitory, including that od Cosimo, and many other walls were decorated by Fra Angelico in collaboration with others, including Benozzo Gozzoli. In addition to Fra Angelico, Antonino Pierozzi and Fra Bartolomeo, San Marco was the home from 1489 onwards of the friar Girolamo Savonarola.
The former Dominican convent of San Marco in Florence, now a state museum, holds several manuscripts that are thought to be entirely or partly by his hand.

Museo Nazionale di San Marco

Convent of San MarcoMuseo di San MarcoMuseum of San Marco
The convent, which is now the Museo Nazionale di San Marco, has three claims to fame.
San Marco met this fate in 1808, returned to Dominican hands after the fall of Napoleon, but then was confiscated in large part by a decree of the nascent Kingdom of Italy dated 7 July 1866 and became State property.

Michelozzo

Michelozzo MichelozziMichelozzo di BartolomeoMichelozzo di Bartolommeo
Also housed at the convent is a famous collection of manuscripts in a library built by Michelozzo.
San Marco has been called the first Renaissance church, though it seems to be a compromise between the Trecento tradition and the Renaissance spirit.

Cosimo de' Medici

Cosimo de MediciCosimo the ElderCosimo
A decisive element was the intervention of Cosimo de' Medici the Elder, who since 1420 had already shown his support for the reformed Franciscan convent of Bosco ai Frati and from his return from exile in 1434 had made clear his desire to see an observant community of Dominicans established in Florence.
In 1444, Cosimo de' Medici founded the first public library in Florence, at San Marco, which was of central importance to the humanist movement in Florence during the Renaissance.

Benozzo Gozzoli

GozzoliBenozzo di LeseGozzoli, Benozzo
These cells of the friars' dorter or dormitory, including that od Cosimo, and many other walls were decorated by Fra Angelico in collaboration with others, including Benozzo Gozzoli.
In this role, Gozzoli assisted Angelico in the execution of fresco decorations in the dormitory cells of the Convent of San Marco in Florence.

Santi di Tito

Tito''' Santi di
Over the first altar to the right is St. Thomas Praying by Santi di Tito from 1593, while over the second altar is a Madonna with Saints by Fra Bartolomeo. The latter also has canvases by Santi di Tito, Crespi, Francesco Morandini, Jacopo da Empoli, and Francesco Curradi.
Santi's mature style is reflected in his masterpiece of the Vision of Saint Thomas Aquinas, also known as Saint Thomas Dedicating His Works to Christ located in the church of San Marco in Florence.

Pier Francesco Silvani

PierfrancescoPierfrancesco Silvani
A further renovation was carried on in 1678 by Pier Francesco Silvani.
Pier Francesco worked on San Gaetano and in the refurbishment of San Marco in Florence, as well as in collaboration with Giovanni Battista Foggini, the aisle and high altar for the Church of Santo Stefano dei Cavalieri in Pisa.

Domenico Passignano

Domenico CrestiPassignanoDomenico Passignani
The interior was decorated in fresco with a Translation and Funeral of St. Antonino Perozzi by Domenico Passignano.
In Florence, he painted frescoes of the Translation and Funeral of Saint Antoninus (1589) for the Cappella Salviati in San Marco and Preaching of John the Baptist (1590) for San Michele Visdomini.

Antoninus of Florence

St. AntoninusAntoninusAntonino Pierozzi
In addition to Fra Angelico, Antonino Pierozzi and Fra Bartolomeo, San Marco was the home from 1489 onwards of the friar Girolamo Savonarola.
In this office, he was involved in the establishment of the Priory of St Mark in Florence.

Bernardino Poccetti

Bernardino BarbatelliPoccetti
The dome of the chapel is by Bernardino Poccetti, also author of frescoes in the Sacrament Chapel.

Francesco Morandini

Il Poppi
The latter also has canvases by Santi di Tito, Crespi, Francesco Morandini, Jacopo da Empoli, and Francesco Curradi.
In 1584–1585, he worked in the Salviati Chapel in San Marco alongside Giovanni Battista Naldini and others; his contribution is a canvas of Christ healing the Lepers.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
San Marco is a religious complex in Florence, Italy.

Church (building)

churchchurcheschurch building
It comprises a church and a convent.

Convent

nunneryconventsnunneries
It comprises a church and a convent.

Dominican Order

DominicanO.P.Dominicans
During the 15th century it was home to two famous Dominicans, the painter Fra Angelico and the preacher Girolamo Savonarola. In 1418 the Sylvestrines, accused of laxity in their observance of the Rule, were pressured to leave, but it took a direct intervention of Pope Eugene IV and the Council of Basel before finally in 1437 the buildings were vacated at San Marco and passed to observant Dominicans coming from the Convent of San Domenico, Fiesole.

Girolamo Savonarola

SavonarolaGerolamo SavonarolaJerome Savonarola
During the 15th century it was home to two famous Dominicans, the painter Fra Angelico and the preacher Girolamo Savonarola. In addition to Fra Angelico, Antonino Pierozzi and Fra Bartolomeo, San Marco was the home from 1489 onwards of the friar Girolamo Savonarola.

Vallombrosians

Vallumbrosan OrderVallombrosanVallumbrosan
The present convent occupies the site where a Vallombrosan monastery existed in the 12th century, which later passed to the Sylvestrine monks.

Sylvestrines

Sylvestrine CongregationO.S.B. Silv.Silvestrine
The present convent occupies the site where a Vallombrosan monastery existed in the 12th century, which later passed to the Sylvestrine monks. In 1418 the Sylvestrines, accused of laxity in their observance of the Rule, were pressured to leave, but it took a direct intervention of Pope Eugene IV and the Council of Basel before finally in 1437 the buildings were vacated at San Marco and passed to observant Dominicans coming from the Convent of San Domenico, Fiesole. When the Sylvestrines left, moving to the smaller monastery of San Giorgio alla Costa, Dominican friars took over the San Marco buildings, which were in a poor condition and for two years or so were obliged to live in damp cells or wooden huts.

Benedictines

BenedictineO.S.B.Order of Saint Benedict
Both of these groups were branches of the Order of St. Benedict.

Pope Eugene IV

Eugene IVPope Eugenius IVEugenius IV
In 1418 the Sylvestrines, accused of laxity in their observance of the Rule, were pressured to leave, but it took a direct intervention of Pope Eugene IV and the Council of Basel before finally in 1437 the buildings were vacated at San Marco and passed to observant Dominicans coming from the Convent of San Domenico, Fiesole. By 1438 the work was well underway and the final dedication took place on Epiphany night 1443 in the presence of Pope Eugene IV and the Archbishop of Capua, cardinal Niccolò d'Acciapaccio.

Convent of San Domenico, Fiesole

San Domenicoconvent of Fiesoleconvent of San Domenico at Fiesole
In 1418 the Sylvestrines, accused of laxity in their observance of the Rule, were pressured to leave, but it took a direct intervention of Pope Eugene IV and the Council of Basel before finally in 1437 the buildings were vacated at San Marco and passed to observant Dominicans coming from the Convent of San Domenico, Fiesole.

Convent of Bosco ai Frati

A decisive element was the intervention of Cosimo de' Medici the Elder, who since 1420 had already shown his support for the reformed Franciscan convent of Bosco ai Frati and from his return from exile in 1434 had made clear his desire to see an observant community of Dominicans established in Florence.

San Giorgio alla Costa

When the Sylvestrines left, moving to the smaller monastery of San Giorgio alla Costa, Dominican friars took over the San Marco buildings, which were in a poor condition and for two years or so were obliged to live in damp cells or wooden huts.

Epiphany season

EpiphanytideChristmas-Epiphany seasonEpiphany
By 1438 the work was well underway and the final dedication took place on Epiphany night 1443 in the presence of Pope Eugene IV and the Archbishop of Capua, cardinal Niccolò d'Acciapaccio.