Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.SanscritSktSkr.SamskritaSanskriticsanSanskrit alphabet
Sanskrit is a language of ancient India with a 3,500-year history.wikipedia
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Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
It is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism and the predominant language of most works of Hindu philosophy as well as some of the principal texts of Buddhism and Jainism. In the early 1st millennium CE, along with Buddhism and Hinduism, Sanskrit migrated to Southeast Asia, parts of East Asia and Central Asia, emerging as a language of high culture and of local ruling elites in these regions.
Two major extant branches of Buddhism are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada (Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana (Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle").

Sacred language

liturgical languageliturgicalritual language
It is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism and the predominant language of most works of Hindu philosophy as well as some of the principal texts of Buddhism and Jainism.
Pali, Sanskrit, Chinese, and Tibetan are the main sacred languages of Buddhism.

Rigveda

Rig VedaRigvedicRig-Veda
Sanskrit is traceable to the 2nd millennium BCE in a form known as Vedic Sanskrit, with the Rigveda as the earliest-known composition.
The Rigveda (Sanskrit: ऋग्वेद ', from ' "praise" and "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns.

Pāṇini

PaniniAshtadhyayiAṣṭādhyāyī
A more refined and standardized grammatical form called Classical Sanskrit emerged in the mid-1st millennium BCE with the Aṣṭādhyāyī treatise of Pāṇini.
(, variously dated between ; and "6th to 5th century BCE") was an ancient Sanskrit philologist, grammarian, and a revered scholar in ancient India.

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu culture
It is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism and the predominant language of most works of Hindu philosophy as well as some of the principal texts of Buddhism and Jainism. In the early 1st millennium CE, along with Buddhism and Hinduism, Sanskrit migrated to Southeast Asia, parts of East Asia and Central Asia, emerging as a language of high culture and of local ruling elites in these regions.
The word Hindū is derived from Indo-Aryan/Sanskrit root Sindhu.

Sanskrit literature

SanskritSanskrit poetryClassical Sanskrit literature
The body of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of philosophical and religious texts, as well as poetry, music, drama, scientific, technical and other texts.
Sanskrit literature refers to texts composed in Sanskrit language since the 2nd-millennium BCE.

Punjabi language

PunjabiPanjabiPunjabi-language
Examples include numerous, modern, North Indian, subcontinental daughter languages such as Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kumaoni, Garhwali, Urdu, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Assamese, Odia, and Nepali.
The name of the region was introduced by the Turko-Persian conquerors of South Asia and was a translation of the Sanskrit name for the region, Panchanada, which means "Land of the Five Rivers".

History of India

ancient IndiaIndiaIndian history
Sanskrit is a language of ancient India with a 3,500-year history.
The language of the gentry at that time was Sanskrit, while the languages of the general population of northern India are referred to as Prakrits.

Mantra

mantrasmantrammantric
It continues to be widely used as a ceremonial and ritual language in Hinduism and some Buddhist practices such as hymns and chants.
A mantra (मन्त्र, English pronunciation ) is a sacred utterance, a numinous sound, a syllable, word or phonemes, or group of words in Sanskrit believed by practitioners to have psychological and/or spiritual powers.

Southeast Asia

South East AsiaSouth-East AsiaSoutheast Asian
In the early 1st millennium CE, along with Buddhism and Hinduism, Sanskrit migrated to Southeast Asia, parts of East Asia and Central Asia, emerging as a language of high culture and of local ruling elites in these regions.
Sanskrit and Pali became the elite language of the region, which effectively made Southeast Asia part of the Indosphere.

Natya Shastra

NatyashastraNatyasastraA Treatise on Theatre
This view is found in the writing of Bharata Muni, the author of the ancient Nāṭyaśāstra text.
The Nāṭya Śāstra (Sanskrit: नाट्य शास्त्र, Nāṭyaśāstra) is a Sanskrit text on the performing arts.

Konkani language

KonkaniGoan KonkaniMangalorean Konkani
Examples include numerous, modern, North Indian, subcontinental daughter languages such as Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kumaoni, Garhwali, Urdu, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Assamese, Odia, and Nepali.
It is inflexive, and less distant from Sanskrit as compared to other modern Indo-Aryan languages.

Stotra

StotrasStotramstrota
It continues to be widely used as a ceremonial and ritual language in Hinduism and some Buddhist practices such as hymns and chants.
Stotra (Sanskrit:स्तोत्र)(sometimes stotram,स्तोत्रम्) is a Sanskrit word that means "ode, eulogy or a hymn of praise".

Indian classical drama

Sanskrit dramaSanskrit theatreSanskrit play
The body of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of philosophical and religious texts, as well as poetry, music, drama, scientific, technical and other texts.
Despite its name, a classical Sanskrit drama uses both Sanskrit and Prakrit languages giving it a bilingual nature.

Hathibada Ghosundi Inscriptions

Ghosundi and HathibadaGhosundi and Hathibada inscriptionsGhosundi-Hathibada (Chittorgarh)
The earliest known inscriptions in Sanskrit are from the 1st century BCE, such as the few discovered in Ayodhya and Ghosundi-Hathibada (Chittorgarh).
The Hathibada Ghosundi Inscriptions, sometimes referred simply as the Ghosundi Inscription or the Hathibada Inscription, are among the oldest known Sanskrit inscriptions in the Brahmi script, and dated to the 1st-century BCE.

Bengali language

BengaliBanglaBengali-language
Examples include numerous, modern, North Indian, subcontinental daughter languages such as Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kumaoni, Garhwali, Urdu, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Assamese, Odia, and Nepali.
Sanskrit was practised by the priests in Bengal since the first millennium BCE.

Vedic Sanskrit

VedicSanskritRigvedic Sanskrit
Sanskrit is traceable to the 2nd millennium BCE in a form known as Vedic Sanskrit, with the Rigveda as the earliest-known composition.
Vedic Sanskrit developed independently in ancient India, evolved into classical Sanskrit after the grammar and linguistic treatise of Pāṇini, and later into many related Indian subcontinent languages in which are found the voluminous ancient and medieval literature of Buddhism, Hinduism and, Jainism.

Daṇḍin

DandinDandiDandi (poet)
The early Sanskrit grammarian Daṇḍin states, for example, that much in the Prakrit languages is etymologically rooted in Sanskrit, but involve "loss of sounds" and corruptions that result from a "disregard of the grammar".
Daṇḍin was an Indian Sanskrit grammarian and author of prose romances.

Gujarati language

GujaratiGujratiGujarati-language
Examples include numerous, modern, North Indian, subcontinental daughter languages such as Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kumaoni, Garhwali, Urdu, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Assamese, Odia, and Nepali.
Gujarati is a modern Indo-Aryan language descended from Sanskrit (old Indo-Aryan), and this category pertains exactly to that: words of Sanskritic origin that have demonstratively undergone change over the ages, ending up characteristic of modern Indo-Aryan languages specifically as well as in general.

Urdu

Urdu languageUrdu:Hindi
Examples include numerous, modern, North Indian, subcontinental daughter languages such as Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kumaoni, Garhwali, Urdu, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Assamese, Odia, and Nepali.
There have been attempts to purge Urdu of Sanskrit words, and Hindi of Persian loanwords – new vocabulary draws primarily from Persian and Arabic for Urdu and from Sanskrit for Hindi.

Indo-European studies

Indo-EuropeanistIndo-European linguisticsIndo-European
As one of the oldest documented members of the Indo-European family of languages, Sanskrit holds a prominent position in Indo-European studies.
He related European languages to Indo-Iranian languages (which include Sanskrit).

Marathi language

MarathiMarathi-languageMarāthi
Examples include numerous, modern, North Indian, subcontinental daughter languages such as Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kumaoni, Garhwali, Urdu, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Assamese, Odia, and Nepali.
A committee appointed by the Maharashtra State Government to get the Classical status for Marathi has claimed that Marathi existed at least 2300 years ago alongside Sanskrit as a sister language.

Dharma

DhammaDharmicdharmas
The body of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of philosophical and religious texts, as well as poetry, music, drama, scientific, technical and other texts.
The Classical Sanskrit noun dharma or the Prakrit Dhaṃma are a derivation from the root dhṛ, which means "to hold, maintain, keep",.

Ayodhya

AyodhyāAyuthyaAjodhya
The earliest known inscriptions in Sanskrit are from the 1st century BCE, such as the few discovered in Ayodhya and Ghosundi-Hathibada (Chittorgarh).
The word "Ayodhya" is a regularly formed derivation of the Sanskrit verb yudh, "to fight, to wage war".

Nepali language

NepaliNepaleseKhas language
Examples include numerous, modern, North Indian, subcontinental daughter languages such as Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kumaoni, Garhwali, Urdu, Dogri, Maithili, Konkani, Assamese, Odia, and Nepali.
Nepali developed in proximity to a number of Indo-Aryan languages, most notably the other Pahari languages and Maithili, and shows Sanskrit influence.