Sanskritisation

SanskritizationSanskritizedSanskritisedSanskrit dialectsanskritized languageaspirationalattempting to claim Brahmin statusbegun a movementclaiming to be pure KshatriyaIndianized
Sanskritization may also refer to introduction of Sanskrit vocabulary in another language or dialect (such as in Hindi).wikipedia
182 Related Articles

M. N. Srinivas

M N SrinivasM.N. SrinivasMN Srinivas
This term was made popular by Indian sociologist M. N. Srinivas in the 1950s. For example, the sociologist M. N. Srinivas, who developed the concept of sanskritisation, juxtaposed the success of the Lingayat caste in achieving advancement within Karnataka society by such means with the failure of the Vishwakarma to achieve the same.
He is mostly known for his work on caste and caste systems, Social stratification, Sanskritisation and Westernisation in southern India and the concept of 'Dominant Caste'.

Passing (sociology)

passingpasschose to join
It is a process similar to passing in sociological terms.
Passing in the context of caste, as prevalent in the Indian sub-continent, is also called Sanskritization.

Nepal

Federal Democratic Republic of NepalNepaleseNepali
This phenomenon has also been observed in Nepal among Khas, Magar, Newar and Tharu people.
Indologist Sylvain Levi found Lassen's theory untenable but had no theories of his own, only suggesting that either Newara is a vulgarism of sanskritic Nepala, or Nepala is Sanskritisation of the local ethnic.

Newar people

NewarNewarsNewari
This phenomenon has also been observed in Nepal among Khas, Magar, Newar and Tharu people.
It has been suggested that "Nepal" may be a sanskritization of "Newar", or "Newar" may be a later form of "Nepal".

Vishwakarma (caste)

VishwakarmaVishwakarmasVishwabrahmin
Vishwakarma Caste claim to Brahmin status is not generally accepted outside the community, despite their assumption of some high-caste traits, such as wearing the sacred thread, and the Brahminisation of their rituals.
For example, the sociologist M. N. Srinivas, who developed the concept of sanskritisation, juxtaposed the success of the Lingayat caste in achieving advancement within Karnataka society by such means with the failure of the Vishwakarma to achieve the same.

History of Hinduism

Hindu historyearly BrahmanismEarly Hinduism
It was aided by the settlement of Brahmins on land granted by local rulers, the incorporation and assimilation of popular non-Vedic gods, and the process of Sanskritization, in which "people from many strata of society throughout the subcontinent tended to adapt their religious and social life to Brahmanic norms".

Dravidian peoples

DravidianDravidiansDravidian people
With the rise of the Kuru Kingdom a process of Sanskritization started which influenced all of India, with the populations of the north of the Indian subcontinent predominantly speaking the Indo-Aryan languages.

Kshatriyas and would-be Kshatriyas

The introduction to the book explains that it was written to examine the expressions of caste politics and Sanskritisation, which had become particularly notable following the 1901 census of India, which had attempted to classify the population into the four varna (ranks in the ritual social hierarchy) of Hinduism.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
Sanskritisation (Indian English) or Sanskritization (American English, Oxford spelling) is a particular form of social change found in India.

Caste

caste systemcastescasteism
It denotes the process by which caste or tribes placed lower in the caste hierarchy seek upward mobility by emulating the rituals and practices of the upper or dominant castes.

Ritual

ritualsreligious ritualritualistic
It denotes the process by which caste or tribes placed lower in the caste hierarchy seek upward mobility by emulating the rituals and practices of the upper or dominant castes.

Sociology

sociologistsociologicalsociologists
It is a process similar to passing in sociological terms.

Christophe Jaffrelot

According to Christophe Jaffrelot a similar heuristic is described in Castes in India: Their Mechanism, Genesis and Development by B. R. Ambedkar.

Castes in India: Their Mechanism, Genesis and Development

Castes in India: Their Genius, Mechanism and Development
According to Christophe Jaffrelot a similar heuristic is described in Castes in India: Their Mechanism, Genesis and Development by B. R. Ambedkar.

B. R. Ambedkar

Babasaheb AmbedkarAmbedkarB.R. Ambedkar
According to Christophe Jaffrelot a similar heuristic is described in Castes in India: Their Mechanism, Genesis and Development by B. R. Ambedkar.

Edwin Felix Thomas Atkinson

E. T. Atkinson
Jaffrelot goes on to say, "While the term was coined by Srinivas, the process itself had been described by colonial administrators such as E. T. Atkinson in his Himalayan Gazetteer and Alfred Lyall, in whose works Ambedkar might well have encountered it."

Alfred Comyn Lyall

Alfred LyallSir Alfred Comyn LyallAlfred Comyns Lyall
Jaffrelot goes on to say, "While the term was coined by Srinivas, the process itself had been described by colonial administrators such as E. T. Atkinson in his Himalayan Gazetteer and Alfred Lyall, in whose works Ambedkar might well have encountered it."

Tribe

tribaltribestribals
M. N. Srinivas defined sanskritisation as a process by which "a low or middle Hindu caste, or tribal or other group, changes its customs, ritual ideology, and way of life in the direction of a high and frequently twice-born caste. Generally such changes are followed by a claim to a higher position in the caste hierarchy than that traditionally conceded to the claimant class by the local community ... ."

Dvija

twice-bornDwijadwijati
M. N. Srinivas defined sanskritisation as a process by which "a low or middle Hindu caste, or tribal or other group, changes its customs, ritual ideology, and way of life in the direction of a high and frequently twice-born caste. Generally such changes are followed by a claim to a higher position in the caste hierarchy than that traditionally conceded to the claimant class by the local community ... ." One clear example of sanskritisation is the adoption, in emulation of the practice of twice-born castes, of vegetarianism by people belonging to the so-called "low castes" who are traditionally not averse to non-vegetarian food.

Vegetarianism

vegetarianvegetariansvegetarian diet
One clear example of sanskritisation is the adoption, in emulation of the practice of twice-born castes, of vegetarianism by people belonging to the so-called "low castes" who are traditionally not averse to non-vegetarian food.

Upanayana

sacred threadUpanayanamyajnopavita
Vishwakarma Caste claim to Brahmin status is not generally accepted outside the community, despite their assumption of some high-caste traits, such as wearing the sacred thread, and the Brahminisation of their rituals.

Karnataka

Karnataka StateKarnataka, IndiaKarnatka
For example, the sociologist M. N. Srinivas, who developed the concept of sanskritisation, juxtaposed the success of the Lingayat caste in achieving advancement within Karnataka society by such means with the failure of the Vishwakarma to achieve the same.

Idangai

left-hand casteleft-hand castesRight hand castes
Their position as a left-hand caste has not aided their ambition.