Santalum spicatum

sandalwoodAustralian sandalwoodS. spicatumWaang
Santalum spicatum, the Australian sandalwood, is a tree native to semiarid areas at the edge of Southwest Australia.wikipedia
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Sandalwood

Sandalsandal woodwood
It is traded as sandalwood, and its valuable oil has been used as an aromatic, a medicine, and a food source.

Santalum acuminatum

quandongdesert quandongnative peach
It has a similar distribution to quandong (Santalum acuminatum) and is a hemiparasite requiring macronutrients from the roots of hosts.
The botanist Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle gave the current name in 1857, placing it in the genus Santalum; the genus containing Australian sandalwood, Santalum spicatum, and white sandalwood, Santalum album.

Santalum

sandalwoodsandalwood treeiliahi
S. spicatum is one of four high-value Santalum species occurring in Australia.

Woylie

brush-tailed bettongBettongia penicillataB. penicillata
The marsupial species Bettongia penicillata, known as the woylie, is known to consume and cache the seeds of this species, and is thought to have played a significant role in its dispersal before their decline in the twentieth century.
Woylies have been observed eating the large seeds of Australian sandalwood, Santalum spicatum, a nutritious food that the animal is known to place in a shallow cache for later consumption.

Acacia acuminata

jamA. acuminataraspberry jam wattle
The main host species is Acacia acuminata, which is used in plantations, which sustains a 15- to 30-year, long-term host species in loamy sands over clay duplex soils.
A. acuminata comprises a number of informal variants (see above) and is the main host being used in Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum) plantations.

Acacia aneura

mulgaA. aneuraAcacia
Rock sheaok Allocasuarina huegeliana, wodjil Acacia resinimarginea, and mulga Acacia aneura are also used.
Mulga can be planted with sandalwood in plantations as a host tree.

Allocasuarina huegeliana

rock sheoaksheoakshe-oak
Rock sheaok Allocasuarina huegeliana, wodjil Acacia resinimarginea, and mulga Acacia aneura are also used.
It is also used as host species in Sandalwood plantations

Ximenynic acid

The seed oil contains ximenynic acid.
It can be extracted from the fruit kernels of the Santalum obtusifolium (Sandalwood) and the Australian sandalwood Santalum spicatum

South West, Western Australia

south-westSouthwest Australiasouth west
Santalum spicatum, the Australian sandalwood, is a tree native to semiarid areas at the edge of Southwest Australia.

Aroma compound

fragrancefragrancesodorant
It is traded as sandalwood, and its valuable oil has been used as an aromatic, a medicine, and a food source.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
S. spicatum is one of four high-value Santalum species occurring in Australia.

Noongar

NyoongarNyungarNoongar people
The Noongar peoples know the plant as uilarac, waang, wolgol, or wollgat.

Santalaceae

sandalwood familysandalwood
It is one of four species of the family Santalaceae to occur in Western Australia.

Swan Coastal Plain

coastal plaincoastal plain catchmentsSwan Coastal Belt
Once found across the southwest of Australia, at the Swan Coastal Plain and inland regions of low rainfall, the impact of overharvesting and land clearing for wheat and sheep since the 1880s has greatly reduced the range and population of the species.

Wheatbelt (Western Australia)

WheatbeltWheatbelt regionWestern Australian wheatbelt
Settlement of the Wheatbelt area was accelerated by the funds generated by sandalwood found there.

Charles Lane Poole

Charles Edward Lane-PooleCharles Lane-PooleCharles
The state conservator of forests, Charles Lane-Poole, reported in the 1920s that the export value of the 331205 tons shipped from 1845 to date was £3,061,661; the primary use when imported to China was the manufacture of incense.

Incense

joss stickincense stickjoss sticks
The state conservator of forests, Charles Lane-Poole, reported in the 1920s that the export value of the 331205 tons shipped from 1845 to date was £3,061,661; the primary use when imported to China was the manufacture of incense.

Western Australia

WAWestern AustralianWest Australia
Research by the Forestry Products Commission (Western Australia), state universities and private industry was undertaken into the cultivation of the tree and the properties of its wood and nuts.

Albany, Western Australia

AlbanyAlbany in AustraliaAlbany' in Australia
Oil valued at $1 000(AUD) per kilogram is produced at Mount Romance in Albany, Western Australia.

Agricultural expansion

agricultural developmentAgriculturalagricultural advancement
Exports of over 50 000 tonnes in the last decade were related to agricultural expansion by increased access and harvesters.

El Niño

El NinoEl Nino-Southern OscillationEl Niño Southern Oscillation
Germination is difficult, and may depend on the El Niño cycle.

Acacia resinimarginea

Rock sheaok Allocasuarina huegeliana, wodjil Acacia resinimarginea, and mulga Acacia aneura are also used.

Antimicrobial

anti-microbialantimicrobialsantimicrobial agent
The oils produced by the tree contain a great complexity of chemicals, many of which have antimicrobial qualities.