Satan

the DevilDevilLuciferPrince of DarknessDragonevilGatekeeperHis ExcellencyMr. ScratchSatanail
Satan, also known as the Devil, is an entity in the Abrahamic religions that seduces humans into sin or falsehood.wikipedia
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Fallen angel

fallen angelsFallenfall
In Christianity and Islam, he is usually seen as either a fallen angel or a jinn, who used to possess great piety and beauty, but rebelled against God, who nevertheless allows him temporary power over the fallen world and a host of demons. The name Samael, which is used in reference to one of the fallen angels, later became a common name for Satan in Jewish Midrash and Kabbalah.
Accordingly, fallen angels became identified with angels who were led by Satan in rebellion against God and equated with demons.

Devil in Christianity

DevilOld NickSatan
In Christianity, Satan is also known as the Devil and, although the Book of Genesis does not mention him, he is often identified as the serpent in the Garden of Eden.
In mainstream Christianity, the devil (or Satan) is a fallen angel who rebelled against God.

Michael (archangel)

Saint MichaelArchangel MichaelMichael
In the Book of Revelation, Satan appears as a Great Red Dragon, who is defeated by Michael the Archangel and cast down from Heaven.
In the New Testament Michael leads God's armies against Satan's forces in the Book of Revelation, where during the war in heaven he defeats Satan.

Theistic Satanism

devil worshipSatanismTheistic Satanist
In Theistic Satanism, Satan is considered a deity who is either worshipped or revered.
Theistic Satanism or spiritual Satanism is an umbrella term for religious beliefs that consider Satan as an objectively existing supernatural being or force worthy of supplication, with whom individuals may contact, convene and even praise, rather than him being just an archetype, symbol or idea as in LaVeyan Satanism.

Demon

demonsevil spiritevil spirits
In Christianity and Islam, he is usually seen as either a fallen angel or a jinn, who used to possess great piety and beauty, but rebelled against God, who nevertheless allows him temporary power over the fallen world and a host of demons.
By the early Roman Empire, cult statues were seen, by pagans and their Christian neighbors alike, as inhabited by the numinous presence of the gods: "Like pagans, Christians still sensed and saw the gods and their power, and as something, they had to assume, lay behind it, by an easy traditional shift of opinion they turned these pagan daimones into malevolent 'demons', the troupe of Satan..... Far into the Byzantine period Christians eyed their cities' old pagan statuary as a seat of the demons' presence. It was no longer beautiful, it was infested."

Iblis

SatanDevilShaitan
In the Quran, Shaitan, also known as Iblis, is an entity made of fire who was cast out of Heaven because he refused to bow before the newly-created Adam and incites humans to sin by infecting their minds with waswās ("evil suggestions").
Due to his fall from God's grace, he is often compared to Satan in Christian traditions.

Serpents in the Bible

serpentthe serpentsnake
In Christianity, Satan is also known as the Devil and, although the Book of Genesis does not mention him, he is often identified as the serpent in the Garden of Eden. In the Book of Revelation, Satan appears as a Great Red Dragon, who is defeated by Michael the Archangel and cast down from Heaven.
In the New Testament, the Book of Revelation makes use of ancient serpent and the Dragon several times to identify Satan or the devil.

LaVeyan Satanism

SatanismAtheistic SatanismLaVeyan Satanist
In LaVeyan Satanism, Satan is a symbol of virtuous characteristics and liberty.
Practitioners do not believe that Satan literally exists and do not worship him.

Inferno (Dante)

InfernoDante's InfernoDante's ''Inferno
Satan appears frequently in Christian literature, most notably in Dante Alighieri's Inferno, variants of the Faust legend, John Milton's Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, and the poems of William Blake.
The circles are concentric, representing a gradual increase in wickedness, and culminating at the centre of the earth, where Satan is held in bondage.

Paradise Lost

epic poemsame nameAwake, arise, or be forever fall'n.
Satan appears frequently in Christian literature, most notably in Dante Alighieri's Inferno, variants of the Faust legend, John Milton's Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, and the poems of William Blake.
The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Demonic possession

possessedpossessionpossesses
During the early modern period, Satan's significance greatly increased as beliefs such as demonic possession and witchcraft became more prevalent.
Christianity holds that possession derives from the Devil, i.e. Satan, or one of his lesser demons.

Book of Job

JobThe Book of JobBook of Job, Messianic anticipation
The satan appears in the Book of Job, a poetic dialogue set within a prose framework, which may have been written around the time of the Babylonian captivity.
The scene shifts to Heaven, where God asks Satan ( – haśśāṭān, literally "the accuser") for his opinion of Job's piety.

Devil

the DevildevilsRed Devils
In the Septuagint, the Hebrew ha-Satan in Job and Zechariah is translated by the Greek word diabolos (slanderer), the same word in the Greek New Testament from which the English word "devil" is derived.
It occurs historically in many contexts and cultures, and is given many different names—Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles—and attributes: It is portrayed as blue, black, or red; It is portrayed as having horns on its head, and without horns, and so on.

Shaitan

Sheitandemonsshayatin
In the Quran, Shaitan, also known as Iblis, is an entity made of fire who was cast out of Heaven because he refused to bow before the newly-created Adam and incites humans to sin by infecting their minds with waswās ("evil suggestions").
The word Šayṭān originates from the Hebrew שָׂטָן "accuser, adversary" (which is the source of the English Satan).

Job (biblical figure)

JobBiblical JobProphet Job
In the text, Job is a righteous man favored by Yahweh.
Job is presented as a good and prosperous family man who is beset by Satan with God's permission with horrendous disasters that take away all that he holds dear, including his offspring, his health, and his property.

Dualistic cosmology

dualismdualisticdualist
During the intertestamental period, possibly due to influence from the Zoroastrian figure of Angra Mainyu, the satan developed into a malevolent entity with abhorrent qualities in dualistic opposition to God.
The religious dualism of Christianity between good and evil is not a perfect dualism as God (good) will inevitably destroy Satan (evil).

Samael

SammaelBelkiraSimiel
The name Samael, which is used in reference to one of the fallen angels, later became a common name for Satan in Jewish Midrash and Kabbalah.
Although many functions usually associated with Samael resemble the Christian notion of Satan, he is not necessarily evil, since his functions are also regarded as causing good, such as destroying the sinners.

Mastema

In the apocryphal Book of Jubilees, Yahweh grants the satan (referred to as Mastema) authority over a group of fallen angels, or their offspring, to tempt humans to sin and punish them.
His actions and name indicate he is the Satan, the "Adversary", but in these religious works Satan is more like him who appears in the Book of Job with a function to fulfill under God than like Satan of later tradition who is the uttermost enemy of God.

Jinn

geniedjinnjinns
In Christianity and Islam, he is usually seen as either a fallen angel or a jinn, who used to possess great piety and beauty, but rebelled against God, who nevertheless allows him temporary power over the fallen world and a host of demons.
Jahiz states in his work Kitab al-Hayawan that loneliness induces humans to mind-games and wishful thinking, causing waswās (whisperings in the mind, traditionally thought to be caused by Satan).

Book of Revelation

RevelationApocalypseRevelation of John
In the Book of Revelation, Satan appears as a Great Red Dragon, who is defeated by Michael the Archangel and cast down from Heaven.
Revelation has a wide variety of interpretations, ranging from the simple historical interpretation, to a prophetic view on what will happen in the future by way of the Will of God and the Woman's victory on Satan ("symbolic interpretation"), to different end time scenarios ("futurist interpretation"), to the views of critics who deny any spiritual value to Revelation at all, ascribing it to a human-inherited archetype.

Beelzebub

BeelzebulBelzebuthBaalzebul
Beelzebub, meaning "Lord of Flies", is the contemptuous name given in the Hebrew Bible and New Testament to a Philistine god whose original name has been reconstructed as most probably "Ba'al Zabul", meaning "Baal the Prince".
In theological sources, predominantly Christian, Beelzebub is sometimes another name for the devil, similar to Satan.

Belial

BeliarBeliallof the same name
describes the sons of Eli as "sons of Belial"; the later usage of this word makes it clearly a synonym for "satan".
In the Ascension of Isaiah, Belial is the angel of lawlessness and "the ruler of this world", and identified as Samael and Satan.

Origen

Origen of AlexandriaOrigenismOrigenist
The classical theologian Origen attributes this reference to the non-canonical Assumption of Moses.
Demetrius condemned Origen for insubordination and accused him of having castrated himself and of having taught that even Satan would eventually attain salvation, an accusation which Origen himself vehemently denied.

Judas Iscariot

JudasIscariotJudases
states that Judas Iscariot betrayed Jesus because "Satan entered" him and, in, Peter describes Satan as "filling" Ananias's heart and causing him to sin.
The Gospel of Luke and the Gospel of John suggest that he was possessed by Satan.

Millennialism

Millenniummillennialmillennialist
He is later bound for one thousand years, but is briefly set free before being ultimately defeated and cast into the Lake of Fire.
In particular, new emphasis was placed on the passages in the Book of Revelation which seemed to say that as Christ would return to judge the living and the dead, Satan would be locked away for 1000 years, but then released on the world to instigate a final battle against God and his Saints.