Satyendra Nath Bose

Satyendranath BoseS. N. BoseBoseSatyendra BoseBose, Satyendra NathS BoseS.N. BoseSatyen BoseSatyendra Nath Bosu
Satyendra Nath Bose, (সত্যেন্দ্রনাথ বসু Sôtyendronath Bosu, ; 1 January 1894 – 4 February 1974) was an Indian physicist specialising in theoretical physics.wikipedia
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Bose–Einstein condensate

Bose–Einstein condensationBose-Einstein condensateBose-Einstein condensation
He is best known for his work on quantum mechanics in the early 1920s, providing the foundation for Bose–Einstein statistics and the theory of the Bose–Einstein condensate.
This state was first predicted, generally, in 1924–1925 by Albert Einstein following a paper written by Satyendra Nath Bose, although Bose came up with the pioneering paper on the new statistics.

Quantum mechanics

quantum physicsquantum mechanicalquantum theory
He is best known for his work on quantum mechanics in the early 1920s, providing the foundation for Bose–Einstein statistics and the theory of the Bose–Einstein condensate.
The foundations of quantum mechanics were established during the first half of the 20th century by Max Planck, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Louis de Broglie, Arthur Compton, Albert Einstein, Erwin Schrödinger, Max Born, John von Neumann, Paul Dirac, Enrico Fermi, Wolfgang Pauli, Max von Laue, Freeman Dyson, David Hilbert, Wilhelm Wien, Satyendra Nath Bose, Arnold Sommerfeld, and.

Padma Vibhushan

Padma VibushanPadma VibhusanPadma-Vibhushan
A Fellow of the Royal Society, he was awarded India's second highest civilian award, the Padma Vibhushan in 1954 by the Government of India.
The first recipients of the award were Satyendra Nath Bose, Nand Lal Bose, Zakir Hussain, Balasaheb Gangadhar Kher, Jigme Dorji Wangchuck, and V. K. Krishna Menon, who were honoured in 1954.

Old quantum theory

quantum theoryBohr–Sommerfeld quantizationBohr-Sommerfeld quantization
Quantum theory had just appeared on the horizon and important results had started pouring in.
Bose and Einstein gave the correct quantum statistics for photons.

Indian people

IndianIndiansIndia
Satyendra Nath Bose, (সত্যেন্দ্রনাথ বসু Sôtyendronath Bosu, ; 1 January 1894 – 4 February 1974) was an Indian physicist specialising in theoretical physics.
Among them are Satyendra Nath Bose, Srinivasa Ramanujan, Jagadish Chandra Bose, Meghnad Saha, Homi J. Bhabha, Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis, and notable Nobel Prize recipients C. V. Raman, Har Gobind Khorana, Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, and Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar who is notable for currently accepted theory on the later evolutionary stages of massive stars, including black holes.

Hindu School, Kolkata

Hindu SchoolHindu College
In the final year of school, he was admitted into the Hindu School. Bose attended Hindu School in Calcutta, and later attended Presidency College, also in Calcutta, earning the highest marks at each institution, while fellow student and future astrophysicist Meghnad Saha came second.

University of Calcutta

Calcutta UniversityKolkata UniversityCalcutta
After completing his MSc, Bose joined the University of Calcutta as a research scholar in 1916 and started his studies in the theory of relativity.
Notable scientists and mathematicians associated with the university include Jagadish Chandra Bose, Prafulla Chandra Ray, Meghnad Saha, Anil Kumar Gain, Satyendra Nath Bose, and Ashoke Sen.

Kolkata

CalcuttaSouth KolkataCalcutta, India
Bose was born in Calcutta (now Kolkata), the eldest of seven children in a Bengali Kayastha family.
Notable scholars who were born, worked or studied in Kolkata include physicists Satyendra Nath Bose, Meghnad Saha, and Jagadish Chandra Bose; chemist Prafulla Chandra Roy; statisticians Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis and Anil Kumar Gain; physician Upendranath Brahmachari; educator Ashutosh Mukherjee; and Nobel laureates Rabindranath Tagore, C. V. Raman, and Amartya Sen.

Meghnad Saha

Megh Nad SahaM. N. SahaMeghnad N Saha
Bose attended Hindu School in Calcutta, and later attended Presidency College, also in Calcutta, earning the highest marks at each institution, while fellow student and future astrophysicist Meghnad Saha came second.
Amongst his class fellows were Satyendra Nath Bose, Jnan Ghosh and J. N. Mukherjee.

Albert Einstein

EinsteinEinsteinianA. Einstein
Though not accepted at once for publication, he sent the article directly to Albert Einstein in Germany.
While the general theory of relativity was still considered somewhat controversial, the citation also does not treat even the cited photoelectric work as an explanation but merely as a discovery of the law, as the idea of photons was considered outlandish and did not receive universal acceptance until the 1924 derivation of the Planck spectrum by S. N. Bose.

University of Dhaka

Dhaka UniversityUniversity of DaccaDacca University
In 1921, he joined as Reader of the department of Physics of the recently founded University of Dhaka (in present-day Bangladesh). While presenting a lecture at the University of Dhaka on the theory of radiation and the ultraviolet catastrophe, Bose intended to show his students that the contemporary theory was inadequate, because it predicted results not in accordance with experimental results. In 1924, while working as a Reader (Professor without a chair) at the Physics Department of the University of Dhaka, Bose wrote a paper deriving Planck's quantum radiation law without any reference to classical physics by using a novel way of counting states with identical particles.
It also enjoyed associations with Satyendra Nath Bose, Vijayaraghavan, and Kazi Nazrul Islam.

List of Kolkata Presidencians

Presidency Collegeattendedclass in 1921
Bose attended Hindu School in Calcutta, and later attended Presidency College, also in Calcutta, earning the highest marks at each institution, while fellow student and future astrophysicist Meghnad Saha came second.

Jagadish Chandra Bose

Jagdish Chandra BoseSir Jagadish Chandra BoseJ. C. Bose
He next joined the intermediate science course at the Presidency College, Calcutta, where his teachers included Jagadish Chandra Bose, Sarada Prasanna Das, and Prafulla Chandra Ray.

Boson

bosonsBosonicinteger spin
The class of particles that obey Bose–Einstein statistics, bosons, was named after Bose by Paul Dirac.
The name boson was coined by Paul Dirac to commemorate the contribution of Satyendra Nath Bose, Indian physicist and professor of physics at University of Calcutta and at University of Dhaka in developing, with Albert Einstein, Bose–Einstein statistics—which theorizes the characteristics of elementary particles.

Prafulla Chandra Ray

Prafulla Chandra RoyAcharya Prafulla Chandra RayAcharya Prafulla Chandra Roy
He next joined the intermediate science course at the Presidency College, Calcutta, where his teachers included Jagadish Chandra Bose, Sarada Prasanna Das, and Prafulla Chandra Ray.

Esraj

dilrubaIsrajIndian violin
He could play the esraj, an Indian musical instrument similar to a violin.

S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences

S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences
In 1986, the S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences was established by an act of Parliament, Government of India, in Salt Lake, Calcutta.
This institute was named after the Indian scientist Satyendra Nath Bose and established in 1986.

Ultraviolet catastrophe

black-body radiation attaining infinite energyblackbody radiation problemCoining the term 'ultraviolet catastrophe
While presenting a lecture at the University of Dhaka on the theory of radiation and the ultraviolet catastrophe, Bose intended to show his students that the contemporary theory was inadequate, because it predicted results not in accordance with experimental results.
Albert Einstein (in 1905) and Satyendra Nath Bose (in 1924) solved the problem by postulating that Planck's quanta were real physical particles — what we now call photons, not just a mathematical fiction.

Bose gas

Bose gasesBose–Einstein condensatesgas of bosons
The statistical mechanics of bosons were developed by Satyendra Nath Bose for a photon gas, and extended to massive particles by Albert Einstein who realized that an ideal gas of bosons would form a condensate at a low enough temperature, unlike a classical ideal gas.

Bose–Einstein statistics

Bose–Einstein distributionBose–EinsteinBose
He is best known for his work on quantum mechanics in the early 1920s, providing the foundation for Bose–Einstein statistics and the theory of the Bose–Einstein condensate.
The theory of this behaviour was developed (1924–25) by Satyendra Nath Bose, who recognized that a collection of identical and indistinguishable particles can be distributed in this way.

Mani Lal Bhaumik

Mani Lal BhowmikManilal BhaumikDr Mani Bhaumik
He won the attention of Satyendra Nath Bose (creator of the Bose–Einstein statistics) who encouraged his prodigious curiosity.

Ratan Lal Brahmachary

He was widely known for his research in pheromones, although his academic background based on Physics, specifically on astrophysics under guidance of S.N. Bose.

Indian Statistical Institute

ISIIndian Statistical Institute, Delhi CentreIndian Statistical Institute (ISI)
He was the Vice-President and then the President of Indian Statistical Institute.

Planck's law

Planck's law of black body radiationPlanck's law of black-body radiationblack-body radiation
In 1924, while working as a Reader (Professor without a chair) at the Physics Department of the University of Dhaka, Bose wrote a paper deriving Planck's quantum radiation law without any reference to classical physics by using a novel way of counting states with identical particles.
Later, in 1924, Satyendra Nath Bose developed the theory of the statistical mechanics of photons, which allowed a theoretical derivation of Planck's law.

Bengalis

BengaliBengali peopleIndian Bengali
Being Bengali, he devoted a lot of time to promoting Bengali as a teaching language, translating scientific papers into it, and promoting the development of the region.
Satyendra Nath Bose was a Bengali physicist, specializing in mathematical physics.