Sauron

Eye of SauronNecromancerDark LordThe NecromancerEyeAnnatarDark Lord Sauroneye-like projectorJ.R.R. Tolkien's villainMomon
Sauron is the title character and main antagonist of J.wikipedia
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The Lord of the Rings

Lord of the RingsLOTRoriginal novel
Sauron is the title character and main antagonist of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.
The title of the novel refers to the story's main antagonist, the Dark Lord Sauron, who had in an earlier age created the One Ring to rule the other Rings of Power as the ultimate weapon in his campaign to conquer and rule all of Middle-earth.

Morgoth

MelkorcrownEnemy
In Tolkien's The Silmarillion (published posthumously by Tolkien's son Christopher Tolkien), he is also described as the chief lieutenant of the first Dark Lord, Morgoth.
Sauron, one of the Maiar of Aulë, betrayed his kind and became Morgoth's principal lieutenant.

Dark Lord

Dark OneThe Dark OneDark Lords
In Tolkien's The Silmarillion (published posthumously by Tolkien's son Christopher Tolkien), he is also described as the chief lieutenant of the first Dark Lord, Morgoth.
In fantasy novels, Dark Lords have become something of a cliché stemming from the success of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, in which the main antagonist, Sauron, is often referred to as the "Dark Lord".

Saruman

Saruman the WhiteSharkeyCurumo
Tolkien noted that he was of a "far higher order" than the Maiar who later came to Middle-earth as the Wizards Gandalf, Radagast, and Saruman.
He is leader of the Istari, wizards sent to Middle-earth in human form by the godlike Valar to challenge Sauron, the main antagonist of the novel, but eventually he desires Sauron's power for himself and tries to take over Middle-earth by force.

Antagonist

antagonistsmain antagonistantagonism
Sauron is the title character and main antagonist of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.
Examples in both film and theatre include Sauron, the main antagonist in The Lord of the Rings, who constantly battles the series' protagonists, and Tybalt, an antagonist in Romeo and Juliet, who slays Mercutio and whose later death results in the exiling of one of the play's protagonists, Romeo.

Wizard (Middle-earth)

wizardwizardsIstari
Tolkien noted that he was of a "far higher order" than the Maiar who later came to Middle-earth as the Wizards Gandalf, Radagast, and Saruman.
They were sent by the Valar to assist the people of Middle-earth to contest Sauron.

Orc (Middle-earth)

OrcsOrcgoblins
Thus, "when Melkor was made captive, Sauron escaped and lay hid in Middle-earth; and it can in this way be understood how the breeding of the Orcs (no doubt already begun) went on with increasing speed".
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy writings, Orcs are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings—Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman.

Gandalf

Gandalf the GreyGandalf the WhiteOlórin
Tolkien noted that he was of a "far higher order" than the Maiar who later came to Middle-earth as the Wizards Gandalf, Radagast, and Saruman.
When the Valar decided to send the order of the Wizards (Istari) to Middle-earth in order to counsel and assist all those who opposed Sauron, Olórin was proposed by Manwë.

Middle-earth

Middle Earthfantasy worldfictional setting
At some point, Sauron left the Blessed Realm and went to Middle-earth, the central continent of Arda, where Melkor had established his stronghold.
In later ages, after Morgoth's defeat and expulsion from Arda, his place was taken by his lieutenant Sauron.

The Hobbit

HobbitThe Hobbit, or There and Back Againbook
In the same work, he is identified as the Necromancer, mentioned in Tolkien's earlier novel The Hobbit.
Tolkien wrote also of being impressed as a boy by Samuel Rutherford Crockett's historical novel The Black Douglas and of basing the Necromancer—Sauron—on its villain, Gilles de Retz.

The Silmarillion

Silmarillion
In Tolkien's The Silmarillion (published posthumously by Tolkien's son Christopher Tolkien), he is also described as the chief lieutenant of the first Dark Lord, Morgoth.
It also reveals how Melkor seduced many Maiar – including those who would eventually become Sauron and the Balrogs – into his service.

Elrond

Lord ElrondElrond Half-elvenDon Elrondo
As created by Eru, the Ainur were all good and uncorrupt, as Elrond stated in The Lord of the Rings: "Nothing is evil in the beginning. Even Sauron was not so."
During the War of the Elves and Sauron in the Second Age, Gil-galad sent Elrond to the defence of Eregion against Sauron.

J. R. R. Tolkien

TolkienJ.R.R. TolkienJRR Tolkien
Sauron is the title character and main antagonist of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.
However, in 1961, Tolkien sharply criticized a Swedish commentator who suggested that The Lord of the Rings was an anti-communist parable and identified Sauron with Stalin.

One Ring

Ringmagic ringRuling Ring
He then secretly forged the One Ring in the volcanic Mount Doom in Mordor.
In the sequel, The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien ascribes to the Ring a darker character, with malevolent power going far beyond conferring invisibility: it was created by Sauron the Dark Lord as part of his design to win dominion over Middle-earth.

Rings of Power

Ring of PowerNineSeven Rings
With Sauron's assistance, the Elven-smiths forged the Rings of Power, which conferred great power upon their bearers.
The Rings of Power in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium are magic rings created by Sauron or by the Elves of Eregion under Sauron's tutelage.

Fëanor

sons of Fëanorsonsseven sons
In the Blessed Realm, Melkor feigned reform, but eventually escaped back to Middle-earth, holding the Silmarils of Fëanor.
He also was the creator of the palantíri (a feat which is said by Gandalf to be beyond the skill of both Sauron and Saruman), and was said to have created the Elfstone in one version of its history.

Mordor

Black GateMountains of ShadowMorannon
He then secretly forged the One Ring in the volcanic Mount Doom in Mordor.
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional world of Middle-earth, Mordor (pronounced ; from Sindarin Black Land and Quenya Land of Shadow) is the realm and base of the arch-villain Sauron.

Celebrimbor

As part of a plan to seduce the Elves into his service, Sauron assumed a fair appearance as Annatar, "Lord of Gifts", befriended the Elven-smiths of Eregion, led by Celebrimbor, and counselled them in arts and magic.
In Tolkien's stories, Celebrimbor is a smith manipulated by Sauron into forging the Rings of Power, setting in motion the events of The Lord of the Rings.

Carcharoth

Wolf
But the prophecy actually applied to the still-unborn Carcharoth, and Sauron could not prevail against Huan, despite transforming into a serpent and his own form.
He was bred with the specific goal of killing Huan, the hound of Valinor, a goal in which he succeeded (Morgoth, as well as his most powerful servant Sauron, was aware of the prophecies regarding Huan's death and set out to make the prophecy come true).

Dark Years

This began the Dark Years.
In J. R. R. Tolkien's mythology, the Dark Years is a term used in The Lord of the Rings for the time of Sauron's great and almost undisputed domination of Middle-earth, during which many peoples were enslaved or corrupted.

Vala (Middle-earth)

ValarValaLórien
Those who entered the physical world were called Valar, especially the most powerful ones.
The Valar, now including even Ulmo, remained aloof from Middle-earth, allowing the rise of Morgoth's lieutenant, Sauron, to power as a new Dark Lord.

Vampire (Middle-earth)

Vampirevampiric bat
Sauron fled in the form of a huge vampiric bat, and spent some time as a vampire in the woods of Taur-nu-Fuin.
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy writings, the term vampire is used loosely to designate mysterious bat-like creatures serving Morgoth and Sauron.

Beren

Beren ErchamionBeren Camlost
Ten years later, Finrod Felagund, the king of Nargothrond and former lord of Tol Sirion, came there with Beren and ten Elves, disguised as Orcs.
But one of the group betrayed the others to Sauron, Morgoth's lieutenant, and they were all killed by orcs except Beren who was away scouting.

Nazgûl

RingwraithsBlack Riderfell beast
Dwarves proved too resilient to bend to his will, but the Men were enslaved by Sauron as the Nazgûl, his most feared servants.
They were nine men who succumbed to Sauron's power and attained immortality as wraiths, servants bound to the power of the One Ring and completely under the dominion of Sauron.

Werewolf (Middle-earth)

werewolveswerewolfwolf
Known as Gorthaur the Cruel, Sauron was at that time a master of illusions and shapeshifting; werewolves and vampires were his servants, chief among them Draugluin, Father of Werewolves, and his vampire herald Thuringwethil.
In J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium, werewolves were servants of Morgoth, wolf-like beasts "inhabited by dreadful spirits" that Sauron had imprisoned in the bodies.