Save (baseball)

savessaveSVblown savesavedsavingSsave opportunitiesblew a save opportunity Blown Save
In baseball, a save (abbreviated SV or S) is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under certain prescribed circumstances.wikipedia
2,373 Related Articles

Mariano Rivera

RiveraMariano "Mo" RiveraMariano Riviera III
Mariano Rivera is MLB's all-time leader in regular-season saves with 652.
A thirteen-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion, he is MLB's career leader in saves (652) and games finished (952).

Closer (baseball)

closerclosing pitcherclosers
The number of saves or percentage of save opportunities successfully converted are oft-cited statistics of relief pitchers, particularly those in the closer role.
A closer's effectiveness has traditionally been measured by the save, an official Major League Baseball (MLB) statistic since 1969.

Sporting News Reliever of the Year Award

Fireman of the YearTSN'' Reliever of the YearTSN Fireman of the Year Award
In conjunction with publishing the statistic, The Sporting News in 1960 also introduced the Fireman of the Year Award, which was awarded based on a combination of saves and wins.
The Fireman of the Year Award originally recognized the reliever with the most combined saves and wins in each league in MLB.

Roy Face

Elroy FaceR. FaceFace
Elroy Face of the Pittsburgh Pirates was 18–1 in 1959; however, Holtzman wrote that in 10 of the 18 wins, Face allowed the tying or lead run but got the win when the Pirates offense regained the lead.
Face was the first major leaguer to save 20 games more than once, leading the league three times and finishing second three times; in 1959 he set the still-standing major league record for winning percentage (.947), and single-season wins in relief, with 18 wins against only one loss.

Relief pitcher

reliefrelieverrelieved
The number of saves or percentage of save opportunities successfully converted are oft-cited statistics of relief pitchers, particularly those in the closer role.
Later research would reveal that Lefty Grove would have been in his league's top three in saves in four different seasons, had that stat been invented at the time.

Win–loss record (pitching)

Win–loss recordwinsWin-Loss record
In conjunction with publishing the statistic, The Sporting News in 1960 also introduced the Fireman of the Year Award, which was awarded based on a combination of saves and wins. He felt that the existing statistics at the time, earned run average (ERA) and win–loss record (W-L), did not sufficiently measure a reliever's effectiveness.
In certain situations, another pitcher on the winning team who pitched in relief of the winning pitcher can be credited with a save, and holds can be awarded to relief pitchers on both sides, but these are never awarded to the same pitcher who is awarded the win.

Rolaids Relief Man Award

Rolaids Relief Man of the Year AwardAL Rolaids Relief Man AwardNL Rolaids Relief Man Award
The blown save was introduced by the Rolaids Relief Man Award in 1988.
Each save was worth three points; each win was worth two points; and each loss was worth negative two points.

Earned run average

ERAearned-run averageearned run average (ERA)
He felt that the existing statistics at the time, earned run average (ERA) and win–loss record (W-L), did not sufficiently measure a reliever's effectiveness.
(He is likely recorded with a blown save.) Starting pitchers operate under the same rules but are not called upon to start pitching with runners already on base.

Bill Singer

Singer
Bill Singer is credited with recording the first official save when he pitched three shutout innings in relief of Don Drysdale in the Los Angeles Dodgers' 3–2 Opening Day victory over the Cincinnati Reds at Crosley Field on April 7 of that year.
That year Singer also became the first pitcher to be officially credited with a save.

Francisco Rodríguez (Venezuelan pitcher)

Francisco RodríguezRodríguezFrancisco Rodriguez
As Francisco Rodríguez pursued the single-season saves record in 2008, Baseball Prospectus member Joe Sheehan, Sports Illustrated writer Tom Verducci, and The New York Sun writer Tim Marchman wrote that Rodríguez's save total was enhanced by the number of opportunities his team presented, allowing him to amass one particular statistic.
Rodríguez holds the major league record for saves in a single season, with 62, set in 2008 while pitching for the Angels.

Goose Gossage

Rich GossageRich "Goose" GossageGossage
Caple and others contend that using one's best reliever in situations such as a three-run lead in the ninth—when a team will almost certainly win even with a lesser pitcher—is foolish, and that using a closer in the traditional fireman role exemplified by pitchers such as Goose Gossage is far wiser.
He led the American League in saves three times and was runner-up twice; by the end of the 1987 season he ranked second in major-league career saves, trailing only Rollie Fingers, although by the end of his career his total of 310 had slipped to fourth all-time.

Rollie Fingers

Fingers
It also noted that blown saves are "non-qualitative", pointing out that the two career leaders in blown saves—Gossage (112) and Rollie Fingers (109)—were both inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Fingers retired in 1985 with 341 career saves, the most in MLB history until surpassed by Jeff Reardon in 1992.

Crosley Field

Redland FieldRedland ParkLeague Park
Bill Singer is credited with recording the first official save when he pitched three shutout innings in relief of Don Drysdale in the Los Angeles Dodgers' 3–2 Opening Day victory over the Cincinnati Reds at Crosley Field on April 7 of that year.
Crosley Field was the site of the major leagues' first save, after the save became an official statistic in 1969.

Baseball

playerbaseball playerbaseball team
In baseball, a save (abbreviated SV or S) is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under certain prescribed circumstances.

Trevor Hoffman

Hoffman
Hoffman was the major leagues' first player to reach the 500- and 600-save milestones, and was the all-time saves leader from 2006 until 2011.

Lee Smith (baseball)

Lee SmithSmithL. Smith
One of the dominant closers in baseball history, he held the major league record for career saves from until, when San Diego Padres relief pitcher Trevor Hoffman passed his total of 478.

Jerome Holtzman

The save statistic was created by journalist Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an official MLB statistic in 1969.
Among Holtzman's contributions to the game during his career was the creation of the save statistic in 1959.

Billy Wagner

WagnerWagner, Billy
Wagner is one of only six major league relief pitchers to accumulate at least 400 career saves.

Ron Taylor (baseball)

Ron TaylorTaylor Ronald Wesley "Ron"
This addressed saves such as Ron Taylor's in a 20–6 New York Mets win over the Atlanta Braves.
He pitched 3.1 innings of scoreless relief in the 1969 National League Championship Series but allowed 3 hits in 2 appearances, earning a save in Game 1 and a win in Game 2.

Dennis Eckersley

Eckersley1992
Eckersley had success as a starter, but gained his greatest fame as a closer, becoming the first of two pitchers in MLB history to have both a 20-win season and a 50-save season in a career.

John Franco

Francohis father
His 424 career saves ranks fifth all-time in major league history (ranking second when he retired), and remains the most by a left-hander.

Bobby Thigpen

Thigpen
He is noted for setting the major league record of 57 saves during the season, which has since been broken by former Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitcher Francisco Rodríguez.

Wes Littleton

On August 22, 2007, Wes Littleton earned a save with the largest winning margin ever, pitching the last three innings of a 30–3 Texas Rangers win over the Baltimore Orioles.
He is noted for being credited with a save after pitching the final three scoreless innings in a 30–3 victory over the Baltimore Orioles in the first game of a two-night doubleheader at Camden Yards on August 22, 2007.