Saxon Eastern March

Eastern MarchSaxon OstmarkOstmarkMargrave of the Saxon OstmarkSaxoneastern marchesLower Lusatia
The Saxon Eastern March (Sächsische Ostmark) was a march of the Holy Roman Empire from the 10th until the 12th century.wikipedia
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March (territory)

marchmarchesMark
The Saxon Eastern March (Sächsische Ostmark) was a march of the Holy Roman Empire from the 10th until the 12th century.

Margraviate of Austria

March of AustriaAustriaMargrave of Austria
The term "eastern march" stems from the Latin term marchia Orientalis and originally could refer to either a march created on the eastern frontier of the East Frankish duchy of Saxony or another on the eastern border of the Duchy of Bavaria: the Bavarian marchia Orientalis (documented as Ostarrîchi in 996), corresponding to later Austria.
Later the march was also called the Margraviate of Austria (Markgrafschaft Österreich) or the Bavarian Eastern March (Bayerische Ostmark, the second word being a German translation of marcha orientalis, though no example of this usage in relation to Austria is known before the 19th century) to differentiate it from the Saxon Eastern March (Sächsische Ostmark) in the northeast.

Marca Geronis

Saxon Eastern MarchMargrave of MerseburgSaxon East March
The Saxon Ostmark initially referred to the vast Marca Geronis ('Gero's march'), established about 939 under the rule of King Otto I in the settlement area of the Polabian Slavs (Sorbs), beyond the Saxon Eastern border on the Elbe and Saale rivers.
On Gero's death in 965 it was divided into five (sometimes counted as six) different marches: the Nordmark, the Ostmark, Meissen, Zeitz, and Merseburg.

Margravate of Meissen

Margraviate of MeissenMeissenMarch of Meissen
After Gero had died without heirs in 965, the tributary lands were divided and re-organised by the establishment of the Northern March around Brandenburg, stretching between the Elbe and Oder rivers, as well as the creation of the March of Meissen, the March of Merseburg and the March of Zeitz in the south.
It originally was a frontier march of the Holy Roman Empire, created out of the vast Marca Geronis (Saxon Eastern March) in 965.

Sorbs (tribe)

SorbsSerbsSlav Sorb tribes
The Saxon Ostmark initially referred to the vast Marca Geronis ('Gero's march'), established about 939 under the rule of King Otto I in the settlement area of the Polabian Slavs (Sorbs), beyond the Saxon Eastern border on the Elbe and Saale rivers.
Gero II, Margrave of the Saxon Eastern March, reconquered Lusatia the following year and, in 939, murdered 30 Sorbian princes during a feast.

History of Poland during the Piast dynasty

Polishfragmentation of PolandPoland
In 963, Gero in late age waged another military campaign against the Slavic Lusatian (Lusici) tribes, up to the border with the Polish lands ruled by Mieszko I.
Mieszko fought wars with the Polabian Slavs, the Czechs, Margrave Gero of the Saxon Eastern March in 963–964 and Margrave Odo I of the Saxon Eastern March in 972 in the Battle of Cedynia.

Odo I, Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark

Odo IOdoHodo
Emperor Otto I invested the Saxon count Odo (Hodo), one of Gero's relatives, with the title of a Margrave.
930 – 13 March 993 ) was margrave in the Saxon Eastern March of the Holy Roman Empire from 965 until his death.

Dedi I, Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark

Dedi IDedi I of LusatiaDedi
In 1046 Dedi I from the Saxon House of Wettin inherited the march, his son and successor Henry I was in addition granted the March of Meissen by Emperor Henry IV in 1089.
Dedi (or Dedo) (1004 – October 1075) was the Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark (also called Lower Lusatia) from 1046 and a claimant for the title of Margrave of Meissen from 1069.

House of Wettin

WettinWettin dynastyWettins
In 1046 Dedi I from the Saxon House of Wettin inherited the march, his son and successor Henry I was in addition granted the March of Meissen by Emperor Henry IV in 1089.
Members of the family became the rulers of several medieval states, starting with the Saxon Eastern March in 1030.

Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor

Otto IOtto the GreatEmperor Otto I
The Saxon Ostmark initially referred to the vast Marca Geronis ('Gero's march'), established about 939 under the rule of King Otto I in the settlement area of the Polabian Slavs (Sorbs), beyond the Saxon Eastern border on the Elbe and Saale rivers.
Otto divided this territory into five separate smaller marches, each ruled by a margrave: the Northern March under Dietrich of Haldensleben, the Eastern March under Odo I, the March of Meissen under Wigbert, the March of Merseburg under Günther, and the March of Zeitz under Wigger I.

Northern March

NordmarkMargrave of the NordmarkNorth March
After Gero had died without heirs in 965, the tributary lands were divided and re-organised by the establishment of the Northern March around Brandenburg, stretching between the Elbe and Oder rivers, as well as the creation of the March of Meissen, the March of Merseburg and the March of Zeitz in the south.
The others were the Eastern March, the March of Merseburg, the March of Meissen, and the March of Zeitz.

March of Lusatia

LusatiaMargrave of LusatiaLusatian
Over the centuries, the Eastern March emerged as the March of Lusatia.
After Gero's death in 965 and the loss of the Northern March in the course of the 983 Slavic uprising, Lusatia became the heartland of the remaining Saxon Eastern March (Ostmark) under Margrave Odo I.

Conrad, Margrave of Meissen

Conrad of MeissenConrad the GreatConrad
Henry however did not prevail and by 1136 the march had fallen back to the Wettin margrave Conrad of Meissen.
Initially a Saxon count, he became the ruler over large Imperial estates in the Eastern March and progenitor of the Saxon electors and kings.

Gero

Gero the GreatGero IGero of Merseburg
The conquered territories were governed by the Eastphalian legate Gero, count in the Nordthüringgau, who was vested with the Carolingian title of a margrave.
After his death, the huge territory he had conquered was divided by the Emperor Otto into several different marches: the Northern March (under Dietrich of Haldensleben), the Eastern March (under Odo I), the March of Meissen (under Wigbert), the March of Merseburg (under Günther) and the March of Zeitz (under Wigger I).

Nordthüringgau

The conquered territories were governed by the Eastphalian legate Gero, count in the Nordthüringgau, who was vested with the Carolingian title of a margrave.
1015) was not able to retain Meissen, but in 993 succeeded his uncle Odo as margrave of the Saxon Eastern March.

Principality of Anhalt

AnhaltPrince of AnhaltCount of Anhalt
While the Margraviate of Landsberg and the County of Brehna split off from the march, further parts in the west were claimed by the Ascanian Dukes of Saxe-Wittenberg and the Counts of Anhalt.
Possibly a descendant of the Saxon margrave Odo, he owned large allodial lands around Ballenstedt in the Schwabengau as well as in the adjacent Gau Serimunt in the former Saxon Eastern March.

Margraviate of Landsberg

LandsbergMargrave of LandsbergMargraves of Landsberg
While the Margraviate of Landsberg and the County of Brehna split off from the march, further parts in the west were claimed by the Ascanian Dukes of Saxe-Wittenberg and the Counts of Anhalt.
The territory located in the historic Osterland region comprised the westernmost part of the March of Lusatia (Saxon Eastern March) between the rivers Saale and Mulde.

Lower Lusatia

NiederlausitzLowerLusatian
Thereupon, the remaining Saxon Eastern March consisted of the territory between the lower Saale and the Bóbr river in the east, roughly corresponding to the modern region of Lower Lusatia.
The area of Lower Lusatia roughly corresponds with the eastern March of Lusatia or Saxon Eastern March between the Saale and Bóbr rivers, which about 965 was severed from the vast Marca Geronis, conquered by the Saxon count Gero in the course of his campaigns against the Polabian Slavs from 939 onwards.

March of Zeitz

ZeitzMargraves of Zeitz
After Gero had died without heirs in 965, the tributary lands were divided and re-organised by the establishment of the Northern March around Brandenburg, stretching between the Elbe and Oder rivers, as well as the creation of the March of Meissen, the March of Merseburg and the March of Zeitz in the south.
In 982, Zeitz was reunited with the marches of Meissen and Merseburg under Ricdag, who thus temporarily reunited all of the southern marca Geronis save the Saxon Ostmark.

Gero II, Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark

Gero IIMargrave GeroMargrave Gero II
During the German-Polish War from 1002 to 1018, Odo's successor Gero II lost the eastern part of the march to Bolesław I of Poland, nevertheless Bolesław's son Mieszko II had to return the conquered territory to Emperor Conrad II in 1031.
He succeeded his probable uncle, Hodo, as Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark including Mark Lausitz (Lusatia) in 993 upon the death of margrave of Lusatia Hodo or Odo I, Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark.

Wiprecht of Groitzsch

Wiprecht von GroitzschWiprechtCount Wiprecht of Groitzsch
Wiprecht (or Wigbert) of Groitzsch (died 22 May 1124) was the Margrave of Meissen and the Saxon Ostmark from 1123 until his death.

Thietmar, Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark

ThietmarThietmar IITheitmar of the Saxon Ostmark
990; died 10 January 1030) was the Count of the Schwabengau and Nordthüringgau from 1010 and the Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark from 1015 until his death.

Henry I, Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark

Henry IHenryHeinrich I von Eilenburg
In 1046 Dedi I from the Saxon House of Wettin inherited the march, his son and successor Henry I was in addition granted the March of Meissen by Emperor Henry IV in 1089.
1070 – 1103), called the Elder (Heinrich der Ältere), a member of the House of Wettin, was Count of Eilenburg as well as Margrave of the Saxon Eastern March (March of Lusatia) from 1081 and Margrave of Meissen from 1089 until his death.

Dedi II, Margrave of Lusatia

Dedi IIDedi II of Lusatia
Dedi (or Dedo) II (died 1069), called the Younger (iunior), was the Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark (also called Lower Lusatia) in 1069.

Henry II, Margrave of Meissen

Henry II
Henry II (1103–1123) was the Margrave of Meissen and the Saxon Ostmark (as Lusizensis marchio: margrave of Lusatia) from his birth until his death.