Sayes Court

Sayes Court Park
Sayes Court was a manor house and garden in Deptford, in the London Borough of Lewisham on the Thames Path and in the former parish of St Nicholas.wikipedia
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Deptford

Deptford, LondonDeptford BroadwayDeptford Green
Sayes Court was a manor house and garden in Deptford, in the London Borough of Lewisham on the Thames Path and in the former parish of St Nicholas.
The two communities grew together and flourished; the docks were the main administrative centre of the Royal Navy, and some grand houses like Sayes Court, home to diarist John Evelyn, and Stone House on Lewisham Way, were erected.

Convoys Wharf

Convoy's WharfDeptford dockyardDeptford Meat Depot
Now completely buried beneath Convoys Wharf and Sayes Court Park, the area shows little sign of its former glory, despite having been a key factor in the creation of the National Trust.
Convoys Wharf also covers most of the site of Sayes Court manor house and gardens, home of diarist John Evelyn.

John Evelyn

EvelynMary EvelynSir John Evelyn
Sayes Court once attracted throngs to visit its celebrated garden created by the seventeenth century diarist John Evelyn. In 1647 Mary Browne, daughter and heir of Sir Richard Browne, married John Evelyn, the famous diarist, who hailed from Wotton in Surrey.
Their house, Sayes Court (adjacent to the naval dockyard), was purchased by Evelyn from his father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne, in 1653; Evelyn soon began to transform the gardens.

Sir John Evelyn, 1st Baronet, of Wotton

Sir John Evelyn, 1st Baronet of WottonJohn EvelynSir John Evelyn, 1st Baronet
After Evelyn's death in 1706 the Sayes Court estate was held in trust for his grandson, Sir John Evelyn, Baronet, as all his own male children had predeceased him.
Evelyn was born on 1 March 1682 at Sayes Court in Deptford, Kent, the second but only surviving son of John Evelyn the Younger, barrister of the Middle Temple and Commissioner of the Revenue, and his wife, Martha Spencer, daughter and co-heir of Richard Spencer.

Gilbert de Magminot

Gilbert de MaminotGilbert Maminot
The Manor of Deptford was bestowed upon Gilbert de Magminot or Maminot by William the Conqueror and this is where he held the head of the barony of Maminot.
In 1814 John Lyon wrote that Maminot built a castle, or castellated mansion, for himself at Deptford, of which all traces had by then long since been buried in their ruins, but from the remains of some ancient foundations which had been discovered the site was probably on the brow of Broomfield, near the Mast Dock and adjacent to Sayes Court.

Deptford Dockyard

DeptfordRoyal DockyardDeptford Royal Dockyard
However Thomas Milton's 1753 plan of Deptford Dockyard shows the house, as the "Poore house", with still a similar footprint to that on John Evelyn's plan of 1653.
He stayed in nearby Sayes Court, which had been temporarily let furnished by John Evelyn to Admiral John Benbow.

Sir Richard Browne, 1st Baronet, of Deptford

Sir Richard BrowneRichard BrowneRichard
In 1647 Mary Browne, daughter and heir of Sir Richard Browne, married John Evelyn, the famous diarist, who hailed from Wotton in Surrey.
Being a Royalist he could not easily return to England to his family estate Sayes Court, in Deptford, opposite the Naval Dockyard.

John Benbow

Admiral BenbowBenbowCaptain Benbow
In 1694 Evelyn moved back to Wotton and in June 1696 Captain Benbow signed a three-year lease on the house.
Benbow signed a three-year lease on Sayes Court in June 1696, a house belonging to diarist John Evelyn.

William Evelyn (died 1908)

William John EvelynWilliam EvelynEvelyn
In 1869, on the closing of the dockyard, William John Evelyn, a descendant of John Evelyn, purchased back from the Government as much of the site of Sayes Court as was available.
In 1869, on the closing of the Deptford Dockyard, he purchased back from the government as much of the site of Sayes Court as was available and by 1876 was turning some of this into a recreation ground for his Deptford tenants.

Robert Hunter (civil servant)

Robert HunterSir Robert Hunter
Robert Hunter advised that they should set up a land company with the aim of protecting "the public interests in the open spaces of the country".
The need for such a body was emphasised in 1886, when the owner of Sayes Court, a manor house in Deptford, wished to give it to the nation, but could not because no national organisation existed to accept the gift.

Manor house

manorhousemanorfortified manor house
Sayes Court was a manor house and garden in Deptford, in the London Borough of Lewisham on the Thames Path and in the former parish of St Nicholas.

Garden

gardenspublic gardenflower beds
Sayes Court was a manor house and garden in Deptford, in the London Borough of Lewisham on the Thames Path and in the former parish of St Nicholas.

London Borough of Lewisham

LewishamLewisham CouncilBorough of Lewisham
Sayes Court was a manor house and garden in Deptford, in the London Borough of Lewisham on the Thames Path and in the former parish of St Nicholas.

Thames Path

Thames Path National Trailriverside trailtowpath
Sayes Court was a manor house and garden in Deptford, in the London Borough of Lewisham on the Thames Path and in the former parish of St Nicholas.

Deptford St Nicholas

Parish of St NicholasSt Nicholas
Sayes Court was a manor house and garden in Deptford, in the London Borough of Lewisham on the Thames Path and in the former parish of St Nicholas.

National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty

National TrustThe National TrustNT
Now completely buried beneath Convoys Wharf and Sayes Court Park, the area shows little sign of its former glory, despite having been a key factor in the creation of the National Trust.

William the Conqueror

William IWilliam I of EnglandWilliam of Normandy
The Manor of Deptford was bestowed upon Gilbert de Magminot or Maminot by William the Conqueror and this is where he held the head of the barony of Maminot.

Barony (county division)

baronybaroniesBarony (country subdivision)
The Manor of Deptford was bestowed upon Gilbert de Magminot or Maminot by William the Conqueror and this is where he held the head of the barony of Maminot.

Manorialism

manormanorsmanorial
Gilbert de Magminot's great-grandson, Walkelin Maminot, dying without issue in 1191, the manor fell to the share of his sister and co-heir Alice, the wife of Geoffrey de Say.

Geoffrey de Saye

Geoffrey de SayGeoffrey III de Saye
Gilbert de Magminot's great-grandson, Walkelin Maminot, dying without issue in 1191, the manor fell to the share of his sister and co-heir Alice, the wife of Geoffrey de Say.

Charles I of England

Charles IKing Charles IKing Charles
The ownership of the manor can then be traced until after the death of Charles I, when it was seized by the Parliament and a survey of the manor was taken.

Parliament of England

ParliamentEnglish Parliamentmember of Parliament
The ownership of the manor can then be traced until after the death of Charles I, when it was seized by the Parliament and a survey of the manor was taken.

Thomas Wolsey

Cardinal WolseyWolseyCardinal Thomas Wolsey
It was owned by Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, and in 1530 when he fell from Henry VIII's favour, it was given to Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk and his wife, Mary, the French Queen.

Henry VIII of England

Henry VIIIKing Henry VIIIKing Henry VIII of England
It was owned by Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, and in 1530 when he fell from Henry VIII's favour, it was given to Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk and his wife, Mary, the French Queen.

Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk

Charles BrandonDuke of SuffolkCharles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk
It was owned by Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, and in 1530 when he fell from Henry VIII's favour, it was given to Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk and his wife, Mary, the French Queen.