Scaliger

Scaligeridella ScalaHouse of Scaligeridella Scala familyScaligersCan Grande della ScalaDella Scala princesHouse of ScaligerLa ScalaLord of Verona
The Della Scala family, whose members were known as Scaligeri or Scaligers (from the Latinized de Scalis), was the ruling family of Verona and mainland Veneto (except for Venice) from 13th to 14th century, for a total of 125 years.wikipedia
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Verona

Verona, ItalyVeroneseSan Michele Extra
The Della Scala family, whose members were known as Scaligeri or Scaligers (from the Latinized de Scalis), was the ruling family of Verona and mainland Veneto (except for Venice) from 13th to 14th century, for a total of 125 years.
After a three years war, the Scaliger dominions were reduced to Verona and Vicenza (Mastino's daughter Regina-Beatrice della Scala married to Barnabò Visconti).

Mastino I della Scala

Mastino della ScalaMastinoMastino I
Upon his death the Great Council elected as podestà Mastino I, who succeeded in converting the signoria (seigniory) into a family inheritance, governing at first with the acquiescence of the commune, then, when they failed to re-elect him in 1262, he effected a coup d'état and was acclaimed capitano del popolo ("people's captain"), at the head of the commune's troops.
Mastino I della Scala (died 26 October 1277 ), born Leonardo or Leonardino, was an Italian condottiero, who founded the Scaliger house of Lords of Verona.

Cangrande I della Scala

Cangrande della ScalaCangrandeCangrande I
Of his three sons, Cangrande I inherited the podestà position in 1308, only the last shared the government (1308) and made a name as warrior, prince and patron of Dante, Petrarch and Giotto.
Cangrande (christened Can Francesco) della Scala (9 March 1291 – 22 July 1329) was an Italian nobleman, belonging to the della Scala family which ruled Verona from 1308 until 1387.

Alberto I della Scala

AlbertoAlberto della ScalaAlberto I
The reign of his son Alberto as capitano (1277–1302) was an incessant war against the counts of San Bonifacio, who were aided by the House of Este.
Alberto I della Scala (died 3 September 1301) was lord of Verona from 1277, a member of the Scaliger family.

Mastino II della Scala

Mastino IIMastinoMastino II of Scala
Cangrande I was succeeded by his nephews Mastino II (1329–51) and Alberto.
He was a member of the famous Scaliger family of northern Italy.

Padua

PadovaPadua, ItalyPatavium
By war or treaty he brought under his control the cities of Padua (1328), Treviso (1329), and Vicenza.
From then till 1405, nine members of the moderately enlightened Carraresi family, including Ubertino, Jacopo II, and Francesco il Vecchio, succeeded one another as lords of the city, with the exception of a brief period of Scaligeri overlordship between 1328 and 1337 and two years (1388–1390) when Giangaleazzo Visconti held the town.

Vicenza

Vicenza, ItalyVicetiaVicentia
By war or treaty he brought under his control the cities of Padua (1328), Treviso (1329), and Vicenza.
Three years later the Vicentines entrusted the protection of the city to Padua, so as to safeguard republican liberty; but this protectorate (custodia) quickly became dominion, and for that reason Vicenza in 1311 submitted to the Scaligeri lords of Verona, who fortified it against the Visconti of Milan.

Brescia

BrixiaBrescia, ItalyBuffalora
Mastino, the richest and most powerful prince of his generation in Italy, continued his uncle's policy, conquering Brescia in 1332 and carrying his power beyond the Po river.
Later the Scaliger of Verona, aided by the exiled Ghibellines, sought to place Brescia under subjection.

Treviso

Treviso, ItalyTarvisiumTrévise
By war or treaty he brought under his control the cities of Padua (1328), Treviso (1329), and Vicenza.
Treviso and its satellite cities, including Castelfranco Veneto (founded by the Trevigiani in contraposition to Padua), had become attractive to neighbouring powers, including the da Carrara and Scaligeri.

Alberto II della Scala

Alberto IIAlbert IIAlberto
Cangrande I was succeeded by his nephews Mastino II (1329–51) and Alberto.
He was a member of the famous Scaliger family of northern Italy.

House of Gonzaga

GonzagaGonzaga familyGonzagas
A powerful league was formed against him in 1337: Florence, Venice, the Visconti, the Este and the Gonzaga all joined, and after a three-year war, the Scaliger dominions were reduced to Verona and Vicenza.
In 1328, however, Ludovico I Gonzaga overthrew the Bonacolsi lordship over the city with the help of the Scaliger, and entered the Ghibelline party as capitano del popolo ("people's captain") of Mantua and imperial vicar of Emperor Louis IV.

Paolo Alboino della Scala

Paolo AlboinoAlboino
He also killed his other brother, Paolo Alboino.
Paolo Alboino della Scala (1344 – 17 or 18 October 1375) was a lord of Verona of the Scaliger dynasty.

Julius Caesar Scaliger

ScaligerJulius Scaligerelder Scaliger
After the Scaligeri had been ousted, two self-proclaimed members of the family, Giulio Cesare della Scala (also known as Julius Caesar Scaliger) and his son Joseph Justus Scaliger, made a reputation as humanist scholars, though their relationship to the historic Scaliger family is disputed.
Scaliger himself was known in his youth by the family name Bordone, but later insisted that he was a scion of the house of La Scala, for a hundred and fifty years lords of Verona.

Scaliger Tombs

Scaliger Tombmarble tombSanta Maria Antica
The church of Santa Maria Antica in Verona is surrounded with the tombs (arche) of the Scaligeri in the form of Gothic shrines, or tempietti, enclosing their sarcophagi: Cangrande della Scala is memorialized with an equestrian statue; Cansignorio by a marble Gothic monument by Bonino da Campione, 1374.
The Scaliger Tombs (Italian: Arche scaligere) is a group of five Gothic funerary monuments in Verona, Italy, celebrating the Scaliger family, who ruled in Verona from the 13th to the late 14th century.

Lords of Verona

Lord of Veronacapitano del popolo
His descendants, the Scaliger, all Ghibellines, ruled the city and its vicinity as a hereditary seigniory for a century and a half, during which the city experienced its golden age.

Cangrande II della Scala

Cangrande IICangrandeCangrande II della Scala, Lord of Verona
His son Cangrande II (1351–59) was a cruel and suspicious tyrant; not trusting his own subjects, he surrounded himself with German mercenaries, but was killed by his brother Cansignorio (1359–75), who beautified Verona with palaces, provided it with aqueducts and bridges and founded the state treasury.

Zavarise

Zavarise
Zavarise is a noble family from Verona, related with Scaligeri.

Joseph Justus Scaliger

Joseph ScaligerScaligerJ.J. Scaliger
After the Scaligeri had been ousted, two self-proclaimed members of the family, Giulio Cesare della Scala (also known as Julius Caesar Scaliger) and his son Joseph Justus Scaliger, made a reputation as humanist scholars, though their relationship to the historic Scaliger family is disputed.
His supposed rank as a prince of Verona (a sensitive issue for the Scaligeri; see below) was recognized.

Veneto

VenetiaVenetianVeneto region
The Della Scala family, whose members were known as Scaligeri or Scaligers (from the Latinized de Scalis), was the ruling family of Verona and mainland Veneto (except for Venice) from 13th to 14th century, for a total of 125 years.

Venice

VenetianVenice, ItalyVenezia
The Della Scala family, whose members were known as Scaligeri or Scaligers (from the Latinized de Scalis), was the ruling family of Verona and mainland Veneto (except for Venice) from 13th to 14th century, for a total of 125 years.

Ezzelino III da Romano

Ezzelino da RomanoEzzelinoEzzelino III
When Ezzelino III was elected podestà of the commune in 1226, he was able to convert the office into a permanent lordship.

Podestà

potestaatpodestapodesteria
When Ezzelino III was elected podestà of the commune in 1226, he was able to convert the office into a permanent lordship.

Coup d'état

coupcoup d'etatmilitary coup
Upon his death the Great Council elected as podestà Mastino I, who succeeded in converting the signoria (seigniory) into a family inheritance, governing at first with the acquiescence of the commune, then, when they failed to re-elect him in 1262, he effected a coup d'état and was acclaimed capitano del popolo ("people's captain"), at the head of the commune's troops.

San Bonifacio

San Bonifacio, Italy
The reign of his son Alberto as capitano (1277–1302) was an incessant war against the counts of San Bonifacio, who were aided by the House of Este.

House of Este

Ested'EsteEste family
The reign of his son Alberto as capitano (1277–1302) was an incessant war against the counts of San Bonifacio, who were aided by the House of Este.