Scapula

shoulder bladeshoulder bladesscapulaesubscapular fossainferior anglescapularslateral bordershoulderbladeaxillary borderInferior angle of the scapula
In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas ), also known as shoulder bone, shoulder blade, wing bone or blade bone, is the bone that connects the humerus (upper arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone).wikipedia
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Clavicle

collarbonecollar boneclavicles
In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas ), also known as shoulder bone, shoulder blade, wing bone or blade bone, is the bone that connects the humerus (upper arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone).
The clavicle or collarbone is a long bone that serves as a strut between the shoulder blade and the sternum or breastbone.

Humerus

humerihumeralupper arm
In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas ), also known as shoulder bone, shoulder blade, wing bone or blade bone, is the bone that connects the humerus (upper arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). These muscles attach to the surface of the scapula and are responsible for the internal and external rotation of the shoulder joint, along with humeral abduction.
It connects the scapula and the two bones of the lower arm, the radius and ulna, and consists of three sections.

Shoulder joint

glenohumeral jointshoulder-jointglenohumeral
These muscles attach to the surface of the scapula and are responsible for the internal and external rotation of the shoulder joint, along with humeral abduction.
It involves articulation between the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade) and the head of the humerus (upper arm bone).

Rotator cuff

rotator cuff musclesrotator interval
The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the muscles of the rotator cuff—the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus.
The subscapularis muscle origin is divided from the remainder of the rotator cuff origins as it is deep to the scapula.

Supraspinatous fossa

supraspinous fossasupra-supraspinatus fossa
The supraspinous fossa (supraspinatus fossa, supraspinatous fossa) of the posterior aspect of the scapula (the shoulder blade) is smaller than the infraspinous fossa, concave, smooth, and broader at its vertebral than at its humeral end.

Spine of scapula

spine of the scapulascapular spinespine
The extrinsic muscles include the biceps, triceps, and deltoid muscles and attach to the coracoid process and supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula, infraglenoid tubercle of the scapula, and spine of the scapula. At the upper part of the fossa is a transverse depression, where the bone appears to be bent on itself along a line at right angles to and passing through the center of the glenoid cavity, forming a considerable angle, called the subscapular angle; this gives greater strength to the body of the bone by its arched form, while the summit of the arch serves to support the spine and acromion.
The spine of the scapula or scapular spine is a prominent plate of bone, which crosses obliquely the medial four-fifths of the scapula at its upper part, and separates the supra- from the infraspinatous fossa.

Rhomboid muscles

rhomboidsrhomboid musclerhomboid
The third group, which is mainly responsible for stabilization and rotation of the scapula, consists of the trapezius, serratus anterior, levator scapulae, and rhomboid muscles.
The rhomboid muscles, often simply called the rhomboids, are rhombus-shaped muscles associated with the scapula.

Teres major muscle

teres majorteres major muscles
Attached to the ridge is a fibrous septum, which separates the infraspinatus muscle from the Teres major and Teres minor muscles. Its lower third presents a broader, somewhat triangular surface, the inferior angle of the scapula, which gives origin to the Teres major, and over which the Latissimus dorsi glides; frequently the latter muscle takes origin by a few fibers from this part.
It attaches to the scapula and the humerus and is one of the seven scapulohumeral muscles.

Deltoid muscle

deltoiddeltoideusdeltoids
The extrinsic muscles include the biceps, triceps, and deltoid muscles and attach to the coracoid process and supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula, infraglenoid tubercle of the scapula, and spine of the scapula.

Supraspinatus muscle

supraspinatussupraspinatus musclessupraspinatus tendon
The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the muscles of the rotator cuff—the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus.
The supraspinatus (plural supraspinati) is a relatively small muscle of the upper back that runs from the supraspinous fossa superior portion of the scapula (shoulder blade) to the greater tubercle of the humerus.

Teres minor muscle

teres minor
Attached to the ridge is a fibrous septum, which separates the infraspinatus muscle from the Teres major and Teres minor muscles.
It arises from the dorsal surface of the axillary border of the scapula for the upper two-thirds of its extent, and from two aponeurotic laminae, one of which separates it from the infraspinatus muscle, the other from the teres major muscle.

Flat bone

flatflat bonesbasal plate
In humans, it is a flat bone, roughly triangular in shape, placed on a posterolateral aspect of the thoracic cage.
The flat bones are: the occipital, parietal, frontal, nasal, lacrimal, vomer, hip bone (coxal bone), sternum, ribs, and scapulae.

Infraspinatus muscle

infraspinatusInfraspinatousInfraspinatous muscle
Attached to the ridge is a fibrous septum, which separates the infraspinatus muscle from the Teres major and Teres minor muscles.
It attaches medially to the infraspinous fossa of the scapula and laterally to the middle facet of the greater tubercle of the humerus.

Infraspinatous fossa

infraspinous fossa
The central part of the supraspinatus fossa and the upper part of the infraspinatous fossa, but especially the former, are usually so thin in humans as to be semitransparent; occasionally the bone is found wanting in this situation, and the adjacent muscles are separated only by fibrous tissue.
The infraspinatous fossa (infraspinatus fossa, infraspinous fossa) of the scapula is much larger than the supraspinatous fossa; toward its vertebral margin a shallow concavity is seen at its upper part; its center presents a prominent convexity, while near the axillary border is a deep groove which runs from the upper toward the lower part.

Coracoid process

coracoidcoracoid processes
The scapula is ossified from 7 or more centers: one for the body, two for the coracoid process, two for the acromion, one for the vertebral border, and one for the inferior angle.
The coracoid process (from Greek κόραξ, raven ) is a small hook-like structure on the lateral edge of the superior anterior portion of the scapula (hence: coracoid, or "like a raven's beak").

Glenoid labrum

labrumtorn labrumglenoidal labrum
The surface is covered with cartilage in the fresh state; and its margins, slightly raised, give attachment to a fibrocartilaginous structure, the glenoidal labrum, which deepens the cavity.
The glenoid labrum (glenoid ligament) is a fibrocartilaginous structure (not a fibrocartilage as previously thought) rim attached around the margin of the glenoid cavity in the shoulder blade.

Suprascapular notch

scapular notch
The suprascapular notch (or scapular notch) is a notch in the superior border of the scapula, just medial to the base of the coracoid process.

Latissimus dorsi muscle

latissimus dorsilatissimuslat muscle
Its lower third presents a broader, somewhat triangular surface, the inferior angle of the scapula, which gives origin to the Teres major, and over which the Latissimus dorsi glides; frequently the latter muscle takes origin by a few fibers from this part.

Suprascapular nerve

suprascapularnervesuprascapular nerves
It is responsible for the innervation of some of the muscles that attach on the scapula, namely the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles.

Subscapularis muscle

subscapularissubscapularsubscapularis tendon
The front of the scapula (also known as the costal or ventral surface) has a broad concavity called the subscapular fossa, to which the subscapularis muscle attaches.
The subscapularis is a large triangular muscle which fills the subscapular fossa and inserts into the lesser tubercle of the humerus and the front of the capsule of the shoulder-joint.

Rhomboid minor muscle

rhomboid minorminorrhomboideus minor
In human anatomy, the rhomboid minor is a small skeletal muscle on the back that connects the scapula with the vertebrae of the spinal column.

Acromion

acromion processacromialos acromiale
The scapula is ossified from 7 or more centers: one for the body, two for the coracoid process, two for the acromion, one for the vertebral border, and one for the inferior angle. At the upper part of the fossa is a transverse depression, where the bone appears to be bent on itself along a line at right angles to and passing through the center of the glenoid cavity, forming a considerable angle, called the subscapular angle; this gives greater strength to the body of the bone by its arched form, while the summit of the arch serves to support the spine and acromion.
In human anatomy, the acromion (from Greek: akros, "highest", ōmos, "shoulder", plural: acromia) is a bony process on the scapula (shoulder blade).

Serratus anterior muscle

serratus anterioranterior serratus musclebranching of a muscle
An abnormally protruding inferior angle of the scapula is known as a winged scapula and can be caused by paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle.
The serratus anterior is a muscle that originates on the surface of the 1st to 8th ribs at the side of the chest and inserts along the entire anterior length of the medial border of the scapula.

Biceps

biceps brachiibiceps brachii musclebicep
The extrinsic muscles include the biceps, triceps, and deltoid muscles and attach to the coracoid process and supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula, infraglenoid tubercle of the scapula, and spine of the scapula.
Both heads of the muscle arise on the scapula and join to form a single muscle belly which is attached to the upper forearm.

Scapular line

The anatomical plane that passes vertically through the inferior angle is named the scapular line.
The scapular line, also known as the linea scapularis, is a vertical line passing through the inferior angle of the scapula.