Scavenger

scavengingscavengescavengersnecrophagousscavengednecrophagyscavengescarrioncarrion birdsconsumed
Scavengers are animals that consume dead organisms that have died from causes other than predation.wikipedia
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Predation

predatorypredatorprey
Scavengers are animals that consume dead organisms that have died from causes other than predation.
It is distinct from scavenging on dead prey, though many predators also scavenge; it overlaps with herbivory, as a seed predator is both a predator and a herbivore.

Carnivore

carnivorouscarnivorescarnivory
While scavenging generally refers to carnivores feeding on carrion, it is also a herbivorous feeding behavior. Many large carnivores that hunt regularly, such as hyenas and jackals, but also animals rarely thought of as scavengers, such as African lions, leopards, and wolves will scavenge if given the chance.
A carnivore, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.

Carrion

carcassescarcassanimal carcasses
While scavenging generally refers to carnivores feeding on carrion, it is also a herbivorous feeding behavior.
Examples of carrion-eaters (or scavengers) include vultures, condors, hawks, eagles, hyenas, Virginia opossum, Tasmanian devils, coyotes and Komodo dragons.

Vulture

vultures Vulture (magazine)a vulture
In vertebrates, only vultures and possibly some pterosaurs are obligate scavengers, as terrestrial soaring flyers are the only animals able to find enough carrion.
A vulture is a scavenging bird of prey.

Tokunagayusurika akamusi

For example, Tokunagayusurika akamusi is a species of midge fly whose larvae live as obligate scavengers at the bottom of lakes and whose adults almost never feed and only live up to a few weeks.
Their larvae are scavengers for organic materials at the bottom of freshwater bodies.

Hyena

Hyaenidaehyenashyaenas
Many large carnivores that hunt regularly, such as hyenas and jackals, but also animals rarely thought of as scavengers, such as African lions, leopards, and wolves will scavenge if given the chance.
Spotted hyenas may kill as many as 95% of the animals they eat, while striped hyenas are largely scavengers.

Jackal

jackalsAdivepredatory mammal of the same name
Many large carnivores that hunt regularly, such as hyenas and jackals, but also animals rarely thought of as scavengers, such as African lions, leopards, and wolves will scavenge if given the chance.
Jackals and coyotes (sometimes called the American jackal ) are opportunistic omnivores, predators of small to medium-sized animals and proficient scavengers.

Detritivore

detritivoresdeposit feederdeposit feeders
Decomposers and detritivores complete this process, by consuming the remains left by scavengers.
Scavengers are not typically thought to be detritivores, as they generally eat large quantities of organic matter, but both detritivores and scavengers are the same type of cases of consumer-resource systems.

List of feeding behaviours

polyphagousMonophagousfeeding behavior
While scavenging generally refers to carnivores feeding on carrion, it is also a herbivorous feeding behavior.

Roadkill

road killroad-killedkilled
Scavenging wild dogs and crows frequently exploit roadkill.
One rarely considered positive aspect of roadkill is the regular availability of carrion it provides for scavenger species such as vultures, crows, foxes, Virginia opossums and a wide variety of carnivorous insects.

Long-distance running

long-distance runnerlong distance runnerlong-distance
In 2010, Dennis Bramble and Daniel Lieberman proposed that early carnivorous human ancestors subsequently developed long-distance running behaviors which improved the ability to scavenge and hunt: they could reach scavenging sites more quickly and also pursue a single animal until it could be safely killed at close range due to exhaustion and hyperthermia.
The endurance running hypothesis suggests that running endurance in the genus Homo arose because travelling over large areas improved scavenging opportunities and allowed persistence hunting.

Hunting

hunterhuntershunt
In the 1970s Lewis Binford suggested that early humans primarily obtained meat via scavenging, not through hunting.
The early hominid ancestors of humans were probably frugivores or omnivores, with a partially carnivore diet from scavenging rather than hunting.

Gyps

griffon
Before its ban by regional governments in 2006, the veterinary drug Diclofenac has resulted in at least a 95% decline of Gyps vultures in Asia.
They are large scavenging birds, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals.

Calliphoridae

blowfliesblowflyblow flies
Well-known invertebrate scavengers of animal material include burying beetles and blowflies, which are obligate scavengers, and yellowjackets.
These larvae, commonly seen on decaying bodies, feed on carrion while the adults can be necrophagous or vegetative.

Apex predator

top predatorapex predatorstop predators
In the prehistoric eras, the species Tyrannosaurus rex may have been an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs, ceratopsians, and possibly juvenile sauropods, although some experts have suggested the dinosaur was primarily a scavenger.
In addition to their effect on prey species, the wolves' presence also affected one of the park's vulnerable species, the grizzly bear: emerging from hibernation, having fasted for months, the bears chose to scavenge wolf kills, especially during the autumn as they prepared to hibernate once again.

Herbivore

herbivorousherbivoresherbivory
While scavenging generally refers to carnivores feeding on carrion, it is also a herbivorous feeding behavior.

Ecosystem

ecosystemsenvironmenteco-system
Scavengers play an important role in the ecosystem by consuming dead animal and plant material.

Decomposer

decomposersdecomposingnutrient recyclers
Decomposers and detritivores complete this process, by consuming the remains left by scavengers.

Biotic component

bioticbiotic componentsbiotic factors
The process and rate of scavenging is affected by both biotic and abiotic factors, such as carcass size, habitat, temperature, and seasons.

Abiotic component

abioticabiotic factorsabiotic factor
The process and rate of scavenging is affected by both biotic and abiotic factors, such as carcass size, habitat, temperature, and seasons.

Germanic languages

GermanicGermanic languageGerman
Scavenger is an alteration of scavager, from Middle English skawager meaning "customs collector", from skawage meaning "customs", from Old North French escauwage meaning "inspection", from schauwer meaning "to inspect", of Germanic origin; akin to Old English scēawian and German schauen meaning "to look at", and modern English "show" (with semantic drift).

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
Scavenger is an alteration of scavager, from Middle English skawager meaning "customs collector", from skawage meaning "customs", from Old North French escauwage meaning "inspection", from schauwer meaning "to inspect", of Germanic origin; akin to Old English scēawian and German schauen meaning "to look at", and modern English "show" (with semantic drift).

Semantic change

semantic shiftsemantic driftpejoration
Scavenger is an alteration of scavager, from Middle English skawager meaning "customs collector", from skawage meaning "customs", from Old North French escauwage meaning "inspection", from schauwer meaning "to inspect", of Germanic origin; akin to Old English scēawian and German schauen meaning "to look at", and modern English "show" (with semantic drift).

Pterosaur

pterosaursPterosauriapterodactyl
In vertebrates, only vultures and possibly some pterosaurs are obligate scavengers, as terrestrial soaring flyers are the only animals able to find enough carrion.

Burying beetle

Nicrophorusburying beetlessexton beetle
Well-known invertebrate scavengers of animal material include burying beetles and blowflies, which are obligate scavengers, and yellowjackets.