Schmaltz

goose fatchicken fatgoose greaseschmaltzyschmalzshmaltz
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.wikipedia
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Jewish cuisine

JewishAshkenazi Jewish cuisineAshkenazi Jewish
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.
Oil, pareve margarine, rendered chicken fat (often called schmaltz in the Ashkenazi tradition), or non-dairy cream substitutes are used instead.

Chicken as food

chickenchicken meatchicken breast
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.
Schmaltz: This is produced by rendering the fat, and is used in various dishes.

Rendering (animal products)

renderingrenderedanimal rendering plant
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.
In the kitchen, rendering is used to transform butter into clarified butter, suet into tallow, pork fat into lard, and chicken fat into schmaltz.

List of English words of Yiddish origin

kvetchzaftigschmooze
The English term "schmaltz" is derived from Yiddish, and is cognate with the German term Schmalz, meaning "rendered animal fat", regardless of source: both tallow and lard are considered forms of Schmalz in German, as is clarified butter.
Schmaltz: Melted chicken fat; excessive sentimentality (from Yiddish שמאַלץ shmalts or German Schmalz) (OED, MW)

Lard

pork fatpig fatanimal
The English term "schmaltz" is derived from Yiddish, and is cognate with the German term Schmalz, meaning "rendered animal fat", regardless of source: both tallow and lard are considered forms of Schmalz in German, as is clarified butter. As an effect of cross-cultural influences of the Jewish Ashkenazi, Polish, and Ukrainian cuisine, it is also popular in Poland and Ukraine, where rendered fats (including lard) are called smalec, with schmaltz derived from geese being popular as gęsi smalec. Schmaltz rendered from a chicken or goose was used by northwestern and eastern European Jews who were forbidden by kashrut (Jewish dietary laws) from frying their meats in butter or lard, the common forms of cooking fat in Northern Europe, as butter, being derived from milk, cannot be used with meat under the Jewish prohibition on mixing meat and dairy, and lard is derived from pork, an unkosher meat.
In English, however, schmaltz usually refers to kosher fat rendered from chicken, duck or goose.

Gribenes

cracklings
The remaining dark brown, crispy bits of skin and onion are known in Yiddish as gribenes.
Gribenes are a byproduct of schmaltz preparation.

Foie gras

pâté de foie grasgoose liverDuck foie gras of the South-west
Thus Ashkenazi Jews turned to poultry fat as their cooking fat of choice; the overfeeding of geese to produce more fat per bird produced modern Europe's first foie gras as a side effect.
Jewish cuisine used olive oil in the Mediterranean, and sesame oil in Babylonia, but neither cooking medium was readily available in Western and Central Europe, so poultry fat (known in Yiddish as schmaltz), which could be abundantly produced by overfeeding geese, was substituted in their stead.

Clarified butter

butter oilclarifiedAnhydrous milk fat
The English term "schmaltz" is derived from Yiddish, and is cognate with the German term Schmalz, meaning "rendered animal fat", regardless of source: both tallow and lard are considered forms of Schmalz in German, as is clarified butter.
Schmaltz, clarified animal fat.

Chicken fat

The term "schmaltz" entered English usage through Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews who used it to refer to kosher poultry fat; the word שמאַלץ shmalts is the Yiddish word for rendered chicken fat.
*Schmaltz, rendered fat that may be made from chicken fat

Suet

beef suetsuet dumpling
Furthermore, tallow derived from beef or mutton would have been uneconomical, particularly given that virtually all suet (the raw material for tallow) is chelev and its consumption is forbidden.
Schmaltz

Schmaltz herring

Schmaltz herring means 'fatty herring' and refers to the a stage of development in the life cycle of the herring when the fish contains the most fat. Popular in Ashkenazi Jewish cookery, it does not contain schmaltz.
Schmaltz herring (Yiddish) is herring caught just before spawning, when the fat (schmaltz) in the fish is at a maximum.

Goose

geesebarheaded geesegander
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.

Fat

greasetotal fatdietary fat
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.

Spread (food)

spreadspreadsfood spread
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.

Central European cuisine

CentralCentral EuropeanCentral Europe
Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine.

Yiddish

Yiddish-languageJudæo-GermanYiddish language
The English term "schmaltz" is derived from Yiddish, and is cognate with the German term Schmalz, meaning "rendered animal fat", regardless of source: both tallow and lard are considered forms of Schmalz in German, as is clarified butter. The term "schmaltz" entered English usage through Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews who used it to refer to kosher poultry fat; the word שמאַלץ shmalts is the Yiddish word for rendered chicken fat.

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
The English term "schmaltz" is derived from Yiddish, and is cognate with the German term Schmalz, meaning "rendered animal fat", regardless of source: both tallow and lard are considered forms of Schmalz in German, as is clarified butter.

Tallow

beef tallowbeef fatgreaves
The English term "schmaltz" is derived from Yiddish, and is cognate with the German term Schmalz, meaning "rendered animal fat", regardless of source: both tallow and lard are considered forms of Schmalz in German, as is clarified butter. Furthermore, tallow derived from beef or mutton would have been uneconomical, particularly given that virtually all suet (the raw material for tallow) is chelev and its consumption is forbidden.

Ashkenazi Jews

AshkenaziAshkenazi JewishJewish
The term "schmaltz" entered English usage through Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews who used it to refer to kosher poultry fat; the word שמאַלץ shmalts is the Yiddish word for rendered chicken fat.

High German languages

High GermanHighGerman
The word is common to the High German languages, including both Yiddish and modern Standard German, and comes from Middle High German Schmalz, a noun derived from the verb schmelzen, meaning "to melt".

Standard German

StandardGermanHigh German
The word is common to the High German languages, including both Yiddish and modern Standard German, and comes from Middle High German Schmalz, a noun derived from the verb schmelzen, meaning "to melt".

Middle High German

MHGGermanMiddle German
The word is common to the High German languages, including both Yiddish and modern Standard German, and comes from Middle High German Schmalz, a noun derived from the verb schmelzen, meaning "to melt".

Kashrut

kosherdietary lawsJewish dietary laws
Schmaltz rendered from a chicken or goose was used by northwestern and eastern European Jews who were forbidden by kashrut (Jewish dietary laws) from frying their meats in butter or lard, the common forms of cooking fat in Northern Europe, as butter, being derived from milk, cannot be used with meat under the Jewish prohibition on mixing meat and dairy, and lard is derived from pork, an unkosher meat.

Food and drink prohibitions

dietary lawsdietary lawtaboo food
Schmaltz rendered from a chicken or goose was used by northwestern and eastern European Jews who were forbidden by kashrut (Jewish dietary laws) from frying their meats in butter or lard, the common forms of cooking fat in Northern Europe, as butter, being derived from milk, cannot be used with meat under the Jewish prohibition on mixing meat and dairy, and lard is derived from pork, an unkosher meat.