School corporal punishment

corporal punishmentcorporal punishment in schoolscanedbeatingscaningcorporal punishmentsfloggingschoolbeatenbeaten with a cane
School corporal punishment refers to inflicting deliberate physical and emotional pain or discomfort in response to undesired behavior by students in schools.wikipedia
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Corporal punishment

physical punishmentcorporalbeaten
School corporal punishment refers to inflicting deliberate physical and emotional pain or discomfort in response to undesired behavior by students in schools.
In several other countries, it still is: see School corporal punishment.

Primary school

elementary schoolprimaryelementary
Less commonly, it could also include spanking or smacking the student with the open hand, especially at the primary school and junior secondary school levels.
He recommended that teachers should motivate their pupils by making the teaching interesting, rather than by corporal punishment.

Caning

canedcanecanes
It often involves striking the student either across the buttocks or palms of their hands with a tool such as a rattan cane, wooden paddle, slipper, leather strap or wooden yardstick.
Many approved schools were known for strict discipline, with corporal punishment used where deemed necessary, generally a rather more severe version of the caning or strapping that was common in ordinary secondary schools.

Crimes (Substituted Section 59) Amendment Act 2007

Child Discipline BillChild Discipline ActCrimes (Abolition of Force as a Justification for Child Discipline) Amendment Bill 2005
This loophole was closed in May 2007 by the Crimes (Substituted Section 59) Amendment Act 2007, which enacted a blanket ban on parents administering corporal punishment to their children.
Section 139A of the Education Act 1989 is the enactment criminalising school corporal punishment, so the third clause prohibited teacher-parents from using force on their own children if it could be interpreted as school corporal punishment.

Tawse

beltedThe tawse
In Scotland a leather strap, the tawse (sometimes called a belt), administered to the palms of the hands, was universal in state schools, but some private schools used the cane.
It was used for educational discipline, primarily in Scotland, but also in schools in the English cities of Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, Manchester and Walsall.

R (Williamson) v Secretary of State for Education and Employment

R. (on the application of Williamson) v Secretary of State for Education and Employment
R (Williamson) v Secretary of State for Education and Employment (2005) was an unsuccessful challenge to the prohibition of corporal punishment contained in the Education Act 1996, by several headmasters of private Christian schools who argued that it was a breach of their religious freedom.
R. (on the application of Williamson) v Secretary of State for Education and Employment; UKHL 15 [2005] 2 A.C. 246, was an unsuccessful challenge to the prohibition of school corporal punishment in the Education Act 1996 by the headmasters of private Christian schools in the United Kingdom.

School discipline

detentiondisciplineschool rule
Throughout the history of education, the most common means of maintaining discipline in schools was corporal punishment.

Slippering

slipperslippers
It often involves striking the student either across the buttocks or palms of their hands with a tool such as a rattan cane, wooden paddle, slipper, leather strap or wooden yardstick.
In the United Kingdom, especially in England and Wales, the slipper was a common implement for administering corporal punishment in schools for students of both genders and all ages.

Campaigns against corporal punishment

STOPPGlobal Initiative to End all Corporal Punishment of ChildrenSociety of Teachers Opposed to Physical Punishment

Paddle (spanking)

paddlingpaddlepaddled
It often involves striking the student either across the buttocks or palms of their hands with a tool such as a rattan cane, wooden paddle, slipper, leather strap or wooden yardstick.

Strapping (punishment)

strappingstrapstrapped
It often involves striking the student either across the buttocks or palms of their hands with a tool such as a rattan cane, wooden paddle, slipper, leather strap or wooden yardstick.

Spanking

spankspankedsmacking
Less commonly, it could also include spanking or smacking the student with the open hand, especially at the primary school and junior secondary school levels.

In loco parentis

loco parentissubstitute parentacting as father
In the English-speaking world, the use by schools of corporal punishment has historically been justified by the common-law doctrine in loco parentis, whereby teachers are considered authority figures granted the same rights as parents to punish children in their care if they do not adhere to the set rules.

Suspension (punishment)

suspensionsuspendedsuspensions
Advocates of school corporal punishment argue that it provides an immediate response to indiscipline and that the student is quickly back in the classroom learning, unlike suspension from school.

Human rights

human righthuman rights violationshuman rights abuses
Opponents, including a number of medical and psychological societies, along with human-rights groups, argue that physical punishment is ineffective in the long term, interferes with learning, leads to antisocial behavior as well as various forms of mental distress, disproportionately affects students of color, and is a form of violence that breaches the rights of children.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Approximately 69 countries still allow for corporal punishment in schools, including parts of the United States, some Australian states, and a number of countries in Africa and Asia.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
Approximately 69 countries still allow for corporal punishment in schools, including parts of the United States, some Australian states, and a number of countries in Africa and Asia.

Southeast Asia

South East AsiaSouth-East AsiaSoutheast Asian
It remains commonplace in a number of countries in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East (see list of countries, below).

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
While most U.S. states have outlawed corporal punishment in state schools, it continues to be allowed mainly in the Southern and Western United States.

State school

Publicpublic high schoolpublic school
While most U.S. states have outlawed corporal punishment in state schools, it continues to be allowed mainly in the Southern and Western United States.

Southern United States

SouthSouthernAmerican South
While most U.S. states have outlawed corporal punishment in state schools, it continues to be allowed mainly in the Southern and Western United States.

Western United States

American WestwesternWest
While most U.S. states have outlawed corporal punishment in state schools, it continues to be allowed mainly in the Southern and Western United States.

United States Department of Education

U.S. Department of EducationUS Department of EducationDepartment of Education
According to the United States Department of Education, more than 216,000 students were subjected to corporal punishment during the 2008–09 school year.

English-speaking world

AnglophoneEnglish-speaking countriesEnglish-speaking
Much of the traditional culture that surrounds corporal punishment in school, at any rate in the English-speaking world, derives largely from British practice in the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly as regards the caning of teenage boys.