Science by press conference

hyperbolize study findingspress conferencemedia stormpublishing premature conclusionsScience by press release
Science by press conference (or science by press release) is the practice by which scientists put an unusual focus on publicizing results of research in the media.wikipedia
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Andrew Wakefield

This was later criticized as 'science by press conference'.

Franz J. Ingelfinger

Franz Ingelfinger
The journal in which it appeared had implemented a long-standing policy under editor Franz J. Ingelfinger which prohibited seeking publicity for research prior to its submission or publication, informally called the Ingelfinger Rule.
It also helped prevent what later NEJM editors called science by press conference, the practice of going directly to the media with scientific results rather than waiting for the peer review process designed to check the work for errors and flaws.

Séralini affair

Seralini affair2013his study
As part of a news embargo, Séralini required journalists to sign an unusual confidentiality agreement in exchange for advance access to the article, prohibiting them from conferring with other scientists before the press conference announcing publication.

Gilles-Éric Séralini

Gilles-Eric SeraliniGilles-Eric Séralini
At a press conference announcing his paper, Séralini emphasized the study's potential cancer implications.

Mass media

mediapressmedia company
Science by press conference (or science by press release) is the practice by which scientists put an unusual focus on publicizing results of research in the media.

Peer review

peer-reviewedpeer-reviewpeer reviewed
Premature publicity violates a cultural value of most of the scientific community, which is that findings should be subjected to independent review with a "thorough examination by the scientific community" before they are widely publicized.

Attention seeking

attention-seekingattention seekerseeking attention
This idea has many merits, including that the scientific community has a responsibility to conduct itself in a deliberative, non-attention seeking way; and that its members should be oriented more towards the pursuit of insight than fame.

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford Medical SchoolStanford School of MedicineStanford University Medical School
The phrase was coined by Spyros Andreopoulos, a public affairs officer at Stanford University Medical School, in a 1980 letter which appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The New England Journal of Medicine

New England Journal of MedicineNEJMBoston Medical and Surgical Journal
The phrase was coined by Spyros Andreopoulos, a public affairs officer at Stanford University Medical School, in a 1980 letter which appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Biotechnology

biotechbiotechnologicalBio-Technology
Andreopoulos was commenting specifically on the publicity practices of biotechnology startups, including Biogen and Genentech.

Biogen

Biogen IdecIDEC PharmaceuticalsBiogen Inc.
Andreopoulos was commenting specifically on the publicity practices of biotechnology startups, including Biogen and Genentech.

Genentech

Genentech, Inc.Genentech, Incgene.com
Andreopoulos was commenting specifically on the publicity practices of biotechnology startups, including Biogen and Genentech.

MMR vaccine

MMRmeasles-mumps-rubella vaccineMMR vaccination

The BMJ

British Medical JournalBMJThe British Medical Journal