Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿ScotsScotsmanScotScottish-bornSCOScotchScottish-TribalEastern Scotland
Scotland (Scotland, Alba ) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.
It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north.

Northern Isles

NorðreyjarNorthernOrkney
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.
The Northern Isles (Northren Isles; Na h-Eileanan a Tuath; ) are a pair of archipelagos off the north coast of mainland Scotland, comprising Orkney and Shetland.

North Sea

Norththe North SeaNorthern Sea
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.
The North Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean located between Great Britain (particularly England and Scotland), Denmark, Norway, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and France.

Hebrides

HebrideanHebridean islandsHebrides Islands
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.
The Hebrides (Innse Gall, ; ) comprise a widespread and diverse archipelago off the west coast of mainland Scotland.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Scotland (Scotland, Alba ) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.
The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Countries of the United Kingdom

Constituent countryCountryconstituent countries
Scotland (Scotland, Alba ) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.
The United Kingdom (UK) comprises four countries: England, Scotland, and Wales (which collectively make up Great Britain) and Northern Ireland (which is variously described as a country, province or region).

Irish Sea

IrishEast Irish Sea Basinsea
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.
The countries that are on its shoreline are, Scotland on the north, England on the east, Wales on the southeast, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on the west.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.
Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island.

Kingdom of Scotland

ScotlandScottishScots
The Kingdom of Scotland emerged as an independent sovereign state in the European Early Middle Ages and continued to exist until 1707.
Following the annexation of the Northern Isles from the Kingdom of Norway in 1472 and final capture of the Royal Burgh of Berwick by the Kingdom of England in 1482, the territory of the Kingdom of Scotland corresponded to that of modern-day Scotland, bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the southwest.

Scots law

Scottish lawScotlandlaw
The continued existence of legal, educational, religious and other institutions distinct from those in the remainder of the UK have all contributed to the continuation of Scottish culture and national identity since the 1707 union with England.
Scots law is the legal system of Scotland.

Religion in Scotland

Christianity in ScotlandScotlandChristianity
The continued existence of legal, educational, religious and other institutions distinct from those in the remainder of the UK have all contributed to the continuation of Scottish culture and national identity since the 1707 union with England.
Christianity is the largest religion in Scotland.

Scottish Parliament

ParliamentHolyroodScotland
In 1997, a Scottish Parliament was re-established, in the form of a devolved unicameral legislature comprising 129 members, having authority over many areas of domestic policy.
The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba; Scots: Scots Pairlament) is the unicameral legislature of Scotland.

Culture of Scotland

Scottish cultureScottishculture
The continued existence of legal, educational, religious and other institutions distinct from those in the remainder of the UK have all contributed to the continuation of Scottish culture and national identity since the 1707 union with England.
The culture of Scotland refers to the patterns of human activity and symbolism associated with Scotland and the Scottish people.

Glasgow

Glasgow, United KingdomGlasgow, ScotlandCity of Glasgow
Glasgow City is the largest council area in terms of population, with Highland being the largest in terms of area.
Glasgow (, also, ; Glesga ; Glaschu ) is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2017 estimated city population of 621,020.

Subdivisions of Scotland

council areacouncil areasunitary council area
Scotland is divided into 32 administrative subdivisions or local authorities, known as council areas.
For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as "council areas", which are all governed by single-tier authorities designated as "councils".

Gaels

GaelicGaelGaelic culture
"Scotland" comes from Scoti, the Latin name for the Gaels.
The Gaels (Na Gaeil ; Na Gàidheil ; Ny Gaeil ) are an ethnolinguistic group native to Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man in northwestern Europe.

Orkney

Orkney IslandsOrkneysOrkney Isles
The well-preserved village of Skara Brae on the mainland of Orkney dates from this period.
Orkney, also known as the Orkney Islands, is an archipelago in the Northern Isles of Scotland, situated off the north coast of the island of Great Britain.

Deputy First Minister of Scotland

Deputy First Minister
The head of the Scottish Government is the First Minister of Scotland, who is supported by the Deputy First Minister of Scotland.
The Deputy First Minister of Scotland (Leas-Phrìomh Mhinistear na h-Alba; Heid Meinister Depute o Scotland) is the deputy to the First Minister of Scotland.

Alba

AlbanyAlbynScotland
By the 11th century at the latest, Scotia was being used to refer to (Gaelic-speaking) Scotland north of the River Forth, alongside Albania or Albany, both derived from the Gaelic Alba.
Alba is the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland.

Southern Uplands

Southern UplandScottish Uplandssouth west Scotland
After the Roman victory, Roman forts were briefly set along the Gask Ridge close to the Highland line, but by three years after the battle, the Roman armies had withdrawn to the Southern Uplands.
The Southern Uplands are the southernmost and least populous of mainland Scotland's three major geographic areas (the others being the Central Lowlands and the Highlands).

River Forth

ForthForth ValleyCarse of Forth
By the 11th century at the latest, Scotia was being used to refer to (Gaelic-speaking) Scotland north of the River Forth, alongside Albania or Albany, both derived from the Gaelic Alba.
The River Forth is a major river, 47 km long, whose drainage basin covers much of Stirlingshire in Scotland's Central Belt.

Picts

PictishPictPictland
Beginning in the sixth century, the area that is now Scotland was divided into three areas: Pictland, a patchwork of small lordships in central Scotland; the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria, which had conquered southeastern Scotland; Settlers from Ireland founded the kingdom of Dál Riata in western Scotland the sixth century, bringing Gaelic language and culture with them.
The Picts were a confederation of Celtic language-speaking peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late British Iron Age and Early Medieval periods.

Dál Riata

DalriadaDal RiataDal Riada
Beginning in the sixth century, the area that is now Scotland was divided into three areas: Pictland, a patchwork of small lordships in central Scotland; the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria, which had conquered southeastern Scotland; Settlers from Ireland founded the kingdom of Dál Riata in western Scotland the sixth century, bringing Gaelic language and culture with them.
Dál Riata or Dál Riada (also Dalriada) was a Gaelic kingdom and political entity that encompassed western Scotland and north Ireland, stretching across each side of the North Channel.

Columba

St ColumbaSaint ColumbaSt. Columba
Operating in the sixth century on the island of Iona, Saint Columba was one of the earliest and best-known missionaries.
Saint Columba (, 'church dove'; Columbkille; 7 December 521 – 9 June 597) was an Irish abbot and missionary Evangelist credited with spreading Christianity in what is today Scotland at the start of the Hiberno-Scottish mission.

Anglo-Saxons

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
Beginning in the sixth century, the area that is now Scotland was divided into three areas: Pictland, a patchwork of small lordships in central Scotland; the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria, which had conquered southeastern Scotland; Settlers from Ireland founded the kingdom of Dál Riata in western Scotland the sixth century, bringing Gaelic language and culture with them.
The term Anglo-Saxon is popularly used for the language that was spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons in England and eastern Scotland between at least the mid-5th century and the mid-12th century.