Scots pine

pinePinus sylvestrisdealP. sylvestrisScotsScotch firsScotch pinepinesScots pines Pinus sylvestris - Scotch Pine
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.wikipedia
749 Related Articles

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
It is the national tree of Scotland.
Remnants of the native Scots pine forest exist and within these areas the Scottish crossbill, the UK's only endemic bird species and vertebrate, can be found alongside capercaillie, Scottish wildcat, red squirrel and pine marten.

Evergreen

evergreen treeevergreen treesevergreens
Pinus sylvestris is an evergreen coniferous tree growing up to 35 m in height and 1 m trunk diameter when mature, exceptionally over 45 m tall and 1.7 m trunk diameter on very productive sites, the tallest on record being a more than 210-year-old tree growing in Estonia which stands at 46.6 m.
most species of conifers (e.g., pine, hemlock, blue spruce, red cedar, and white/scots/jack pine), but not all (e.g., larch)

Bark (botany)

barktree barkperiderm
The bark is thick, scaly dark grey-brown on the lower trunk, and thin, flaky and orange on the upper trunk and branches.
The inner bark (phloem) of some trees is edible; in Scandinavia, bark bread is made from rye to which the toasted and ground innermost layer of bark of scots pine or birch is added.

Caledonian Forest

CaledonianCaledonian pine forestCaledonian conifer forests
The Scots pine formed much of the Caledonian Forest which once covered much of the Scottish Highland.
The Scots pines of the Caledonian Forest are directly descended from the first pines to arrive in Scotland following the Late Glacial; arriving about 7000 BC.

Pinus nigra

black pineCorsican pineEuropean black pine
In central and southern Europe, it occurs with numerous additional species, including European black pine, mountain pine, Macedonian pine, and Swiss pine.
In Mediterranean Europe and the Anatolian Peninsula (Asia Minor), trees usually associated with this species include Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), Serbian spruce (Picea omorika), Bosnian pine (Pinus heldreichii), Norway spruce (Picea abies), Taurus cedar (Cedrus libani), European silver fir (Abies alba) and related firs.

Spruce

Piceasprucesspruce tree
On fertile sites, Scots pine is out-competed by other, usually spruce or broad-leaved tree species.
The resin was used in the manufacture of pitch in the past (before the use of petrochemicals); the scientific name Picea derives from Latin "pitch pine" (referring to Scots pine), from, an adjective from "pitch".

Glen Affric

Glen Affric EstateLaird of Glen AffricAffric
Only comparatively small areas (17,000 ha, only just over 1% of the estimated original 1,500,000 ha) of this ancient forest remain, the main surviving remnants being at Abernethy Forest, Glen Affric, Rothiemurchus Forest, and the Black Wood of Rannoch.
Scots pine trees first colonised the area after the last Ice Age 8-10,000 years ago.

Vegetable flannel

Scots pine fibres are used to make the textile known as vegetable flannel, which has a hemp-like appearance, but with a tighter, softer texture.
Vegetable flannel is a type of flannel using fibres from the Scots pine, or pinus sylvestris, rather than traditional woollen fibres.

Clan Gregor

MacGregorsMacGregorClan MacGregor
Additionally, the Scots pine is the plant badge of Clan Gregor and has been proposed as the national tree of Scotland
Plant badge: The clan badge or plant badge of Clan Gregor is Scots Pine.

Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

pine wood nematodeB. xylophiluspine wilt disease
Scots pines may be killed by the pine wood nematode, which causes pine wilt disease.
, P. pinaster, P. sylvestris, P. ponderosa, P. rudis, P. pseudostrobus, P. oocarpa, P. radiata, P. greggii''

Rosin

colophonycolophoniumwood rosin
The pine has also been used as a source of rosin and turpentine.
In the north of Europe, rosin is obtained from the Scots Pine P. sylvestris, and throughout European countries local supplies are obtained from other species of pine, with Aleppo Pine P. halepensis being particularly important in the Mediterranean region.

Christmas tree

Christmas Treestreedecorated tree
It has been widely used in the United States for the Christmas tree trade, and was one of the most popular Christmas trees from the 1950s through the 1980s.
Scots pine Pinus sylvestris

Wilt disease

Pine wiltwiltWilting
Scots pines may be killed by the pine wood nematode, which causes pine wilt disease.
In the Midwest United States it has killed many Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris), and this attractive tree is no longer recommended for landscaping uses there.

Species

specificspecific namespecific epithet
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Pine

pine treepine treesPinus
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Native plant

nativenative plantsindigenous
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Eurasia

Eurasian continentEurasiannorthern Eurasia
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Western Europe

WesternWestWestern European
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Siberia

SiberianEastern SiberiaWestern Siberia
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Caucasus Mountains

CaucasusGreater Caucasus Mountain RangeLesser Caucasus Mountains
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Anatolia

Asia MinorAsiaAnatolian
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Arctic Circle

circumpolarArcticArctic Circle,
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Scandinavia

ScandinavianScandinavian countriesNordic
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a species of pine that is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia.

Broad-leaved tree

broadleafbroad-leavedbroadleaf tree
On fertile sites, Scots pine is out-competed by other, usually spruce or broad-leaved tree species.

Pinophyta

coniferconiferousconifers
Pinus sylvestris is an evergreen coniferous tree growing up to 35 m in height and 1 m trunk diameter when mature, exceptionally over 45 m tall and 1.7 m trunk diameter on very productive sites, the tallest on record being a more than 210-year-old tree growing in Estonia which stands at 46.6 m.