Scottish Gaelic

GaelicScots GaelicGaelic languageScottishScottish Gaelic languageModern GaelicGàidhligGaelic-speakingGaelic:Gd:
Scottish Gaelic (undefined, Am Faclair Beag ) or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, native to the Gaels of Scotland.wikipedia
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Gaels

GaelicGaelGaelic culture
Scottish Gaelic (undefined, Am Faclair Beag ) or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, native to the Gaels of Scotland.
They are associated with the Gaelic languages: a branch of the Celtic languages comprising Irish, Manx and Scottish Gaelic.

Canadian Gaelic

GaelicScottish GaelicCanadian communities with Scottish Gaelic speakers
Outside Scotland, a dialect known as Canadian Gaelic has been spoken in eastern Canada since the 18th century.
Canadian Gaelic or Cape Breton Gaelic (Gàidhlig Chanada, A' Ghàidhlig Chanadach or Gàidhlig Cheap Bhreatainn), known in English as often simply Gaelic, is a collective term for the dialects of Scottish Gaelic spoken in Atlantic Canada.

Goidelic languages

GaelicGoidelicGaelic languages
Scottish Gaelic (undefined, Am Faclair Beag ) or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, native to the Gaels of Scotland.
There are three modern Goidelic languages: Irish (Gaeilge), Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) and Manx (Gaelg), the last of which died out in the 20th century but has since been revived to some degree.

Argyll

ArgyllshireCounty of ArgyllArgyleshire
Gaelic was commonly believed to have been brought to Scotland, in the 4th–5th centuries CE, by settlers from Ireland who founded the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata on Scotland's west coast in present-day Argyll.
Argyll (archaically Argyle, Earra-Ghàidheal in modern Gaelic, ), sometimes called Argyllshire, is a historic county and registration county of western Scotland.

Irish language

IrishGaelicIrish Gaelic
As a Goidelic language, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish.
Irish has been the dominant language of the Irish people for most of their recorded history, and they brought it with them to other regions, notably Scotland and the Isle of Man, where Middle Irish gave rise to Scottish Gaelic and Manx respectively.

Scots language

ScotsLowland ScotsScottish
Scottish Gaelic is distinct from Scots, the Middle English-derived language varieties which had come to be spoken in most of the Lowlands of Scotland by the early modern era.
It is sometimes called Lowland Scots to distinguish it from Scottish Gaelic, the Celtic language which was historically restricted to most of the Highlands, the Hebrides and Galloway after the 16th century.

Manx language

ManxManx Gaeliclanguage
As a Goidelic language, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish.
The sister languages of Irish and Scottish Gaelic use Gaeilge (dialect variants Gaoluinn, Gaedhlag, Gaelge and Gaelic) and Gàidhlig, respectively, for their languages.

Middle Irish

GaelicMiddle Irish languageMedieval Gaelic
As a Goidelic language, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish.
The modern Goidelic languages—Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx—are all descendants of Middle Irish.

Dumfriesshire

DumfriesCounty of DumfriesDumfrieshire
It was spoken to a lesser degree in north Ayrshire, Renfrewshire, the Clyde Valley and eastern Dumfriesshire.
Dumfriesshire or the County of Dumfries (Siorrachd Dhùn Phris in Gaelic) is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area of Scotland.

Malcolm III of Scotland

Malcolm IIIMalcolm CanmoreMáel Coluim mac Donnchada
Many historians mark the reign of King Malcom Canmore (Malcolm III) as the beginning of Gaelic's eclipse in Scotland.
He was later nicknamed "Canmore" ("ceann mòr", Gaelic for "Great Chief": "ceann" denotes "leader", "head" (of state) and "mòr" denotes "pre-eminent", "great", and "big").

David I of Scotland

David IKing David IDavid
The establishment of royal burghs throughout the same area, particularly under David I, attracted large numbers of foreigners speaking Old English.
David I or Dauíd mac Maíl Choluim (Modern: Daibhidh I mac [Mhaoil] Chaluim; c.

Donald III of Scotland

Donald IIIDonalbainDonald Bane
When Malcolm and Margaret died in 1093, the Gaelic aristocracy rejected their anglicised sons and instead backed Malcolm's brother Donald Bàn.
Donald III (Medieval Gaelic: Domnall mac Donnchada; Modern Gaelic: Dòmhnall mac Dhonnchaidh), and nicknamed "Donald the Fair" or "Donald the White" (Medieval Gaelic:"Domnall Bán", anglicised as Donald Bane/Bain or Donalbane/Donalbain), (c.

Kingdom of Scotland

ScotlandScottishScots
In 1018, after the conquest of the Lothians by the Kingdom of Scotland, Gaelic reached its social, cultural, political, and geographic zenith.
Significant languages in the medieval kingdom included Gaelic, Old English, Norse and French; but by the early modern era Middle Scots had begun to dominate.

Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005

Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act
However, it is classed as an indigenous language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, which the British government has ratified, and the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005 established a language-development body, Bòrd na Gàidhlig.
The Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005 (Achd na Gàidhlig (Alba) 2005) is an Act of the Scottish Parliament passed in 2005, and is the first piece of legislation to give formal recognition to the Scottish Gaelic language.

Gàidhealtachd

HighlandersHighlanderGaeldom
Donald had spent 17 years in Gaelic Ireland and his power base was in the thoroughly Gaelic west of Scotland.
The Gàidhealtachd (English: Gaeldom) usually refers to the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and especially the Scottish Gaelic-speaking culture of the area.

Pictish language

PictishPictsa Brythonic language
By 900, Pictish appears to have become extinct, completely replaced by Gaelic.
Pictish was replaced by – or subsumed into – Gaelic in the latter centuries of the Pictish period.

Renfrewshire

Renfrewshire CouncilRenfrewRenfrewshire council area
It was spoken to a lesser degree in north Ayrshire, Renfrewshire, the Clyde Valley and eastern Dumfriesshire.
The name is believed to originate from Common Brittonic/Cumbric, from ren, as in Scottish Gaelic: rinn, or as in Welsh: rhyn (a point or cape of land) and from frew, as in Welsh: fraw, or ffrau (flow of water).

Indo-European languages

Indo-EuropeanIndo-European languageIndo-European language family
Scottish Gaelic (undefined, Am Faclair Beag ) or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, native to the Gaels of Scotland.

North Channel (Great Britain and Ireland)

North ChannelIrish ChannelStraits of Moyle
Dialects on both sides of the Straits of Moyle (the North Channel) linking Scottish Gaelic with Irish are now extinct, though native speakers were still to be found on the Mull of Kintyre, on Rathlin and in North East Ireland as late as the mid-20th century.
The North Channel (known in Irish and Scottish Gaelic as Sruth na Maoile, in Scots as the Sheuch ) is the strait between north-eastern Northern Ireland and south-western Scotland.

Rannoch

The first well-known translation of the Bible into Scottish Gaelic was made in 1767 when Dr James Stuart of Killin and Dugald Buchanan of Rannoch produced a translation of the New Testament.
Rannoch (Raineach or Raithneach meaning bracken in Gaelic) is an area of the Scottish Highlands between the A9 road, to the east, and the A82, to the west.

Outer Hebrides

Western IslesNa h-Eileanan SiarOuter Hebridean
The highest percentages of Gaelic speakers were in the Outer Hebrides.
Scottish Gaelic is the predominant spoken language, although in a few areas English speakers form a majority.

European Union

EUEuropeanEurope
Scottish Gaelic is not an official language of either the European Union or the United Kingdom.
Catalan, Galician, Basque, Scottish Gaelic, and Welsh are not recognised official languages of the European Union but have semi-official status: official translations of the treaties are made into them and citizens have the right to correspond with the institutions in these languages.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
Scottish Gaelic (undefined, Am Faclair Beag ) or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, native to the Gaels of Scotland.
Scotland has three officially recognised languages: English, Scots, and Scottish Gaelic.

Inner Hebrides

Inner HebrideanInnerHebridean
The islands in the Inner Hebrides with significant percentages of Gaelic speakers are Tiree (38.3%), Raasay (30.4%), Skye (29.4%), Lismore (26.9%), Colonsay (20.2%), and Islay (19.0%).
The Inner Hebrides (Scottish Gaelic: Na h-Eileanan a-staigh, "the inner isles") is an archipelago off the west coast of mainland Scotland, to the south east of the Outer Hebrides.

Education (Scotland) Act 1872

1872 Education ActEducation (Scotland) Actexclusion of Scottish Gaelic from the educational system
The Education (Scotland) Act 1872 provided universal education in Scotland, but completely ignored Gaelic in its plans.
For this reason it is credited with causing substantial harm to the Scottish Gaelic language and contributing to its overall decline.