Scottish Gaelic name

ScottishScottish Gaelic personal naming systemGaelic namepatronymicScottish Gaelic surnamesScottish namesScottish originScottish surname
A formal Gaelic language name consists of a given name and a surname.wikipedia
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Patronymic

patronymibnbin
The majority of Gaelic surnames in the Highlands and western parts are patronymic in nature and of Goidelic extraction, although epithets, geography or occupation and borrowings also occur in some surnames.
Colloquial Scottish Gaelic also has other patronymics of a slightly different form for individuals, still in use (for more information please see: Scottish Gaelic personal naming system).

Icelandic name

Icelandic naming conventionsIcelandic customIcelandic

Scottish Gaelic

GaelicScots GaelicGaelic language
A formal Gaelic language name consists of a given name and a surname.

Scottish Gaelic phonology

Scottish Gaelicthe Gaelic sound system
First names are either native or nativized (i.e. borrowed and made to fit the Gaelic sound system).

Patronymic surname

patronymicpatronymic derivationpatronym
Surnames are generally patronymic, i.e. they refer to a historical ancestor.

Lenition

lenitedspirantizationsoft mutation
However, when used in the female form the first letter is lenited (if possible).

Goidelic languages

GaelicGoidelicGaelic languages
Gaelic first names chiefly hail from 5 linguistic layers, Goidelic and 4 others, coinciding with the main languages of contact: Latin, Norse, Anglo-Norman and Scots.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
Gaelic first names chiefly hail from 5 linguistic layers, Goidelic and 4 others, coinciding with the main languages of contact: Latin, Norse, Anglo-Norman and Scots.

Old Norse

NorseOld IcelandicOld West Norse
Gaelic first names chiefly hail from 5 linguistic layers, Goidelic and 4 others, coinciding with the main languages of contact: Latin, Norse, Anglo-Norman and Scots.

Anglo-Norman language

Anglo-NormanAnglo-FrenchAnglo-Norman French
Gaelic first names chiefly hail from 5 linguistic layers, Goidelic and 4 others, coinciding with the main languages of contact: Latin, Norse, Anglo-Norman and Scots.

Scots language

ScotsLowland ScotsScottish
Gaelic first names chiefly hail from 5 linguistic layers, Goidelic and 4 others, coinciding with the main languages of contact: Latin, Norse, Anglo-Norman and Scots. A fair number of Gaelic names were borrowed into English or Scots at different periods (e.g. Kenneth, Duncan, Donald, Malcolm, Calum, Lachlan, Alasdair, Iain, Eilidh), although it can sometimes be difficult to tell if the donor language was Irish or Scottish Gaelic (e.g. Deirdre, Rory, Kennedy, Bridget/Bride, Aiden).

Old Irish

Old GaelicOldearly Irish
The first two categories were no longer productive for the most part towards the end of the Old Irish period but the last type persisted, reinforced by the coinage of ecclesiastical names following Christianization.

Irish language

IrishGaelicIrish Gaelic
A fair number of Gaelic names were borrowed into English or Scots at different periods (e.g. Kenneth, Duncan, Donald, Malcolm, Calum, Lachlan, Alasdair, Iain, Eilidh), although it can sometimes be difficult to tell if the donor language was Irish or Scottish Gaelic (e.g. Deirdre, Rory, Kennedy, Bridget/Bride, Aiden).

Morphology (linguistics)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
On occasion, the same name was borrowed more than once due to misinterpretation of Gaelic morphology.

Vocative case

vocativedirect addressvocatives
For example, the names Hamish and Mhairi are derived from Gaelic Seumas and Màiri but rather than borrowing the root forms, the English/Scots forms are based on the Gaelic vocative case forms Sheumais and Mhàiri.

Cognate

cognatescognationequivalent
Others were with no cognate were often equated with English/Scots names which bore some similarity to the Gaelic name in order to obtain "English equivalents".

Euphemia

Saint EuphemiaSt. EuphemiaEuphemia of Chalcedon
This includes Oighrig which was equated with Euphemia, Dìorbhail with Dorothy, Beathag with Rebecca or Sophie.

Dorothy (given name)

DorothyDorothea
This includes Oighrig which was equated with Euphemia, Dìorbhail with Dorothy, Beathag with Rebecca or Sophie.

Rebecca

RebekahRebeccahRebecka
This includes Oighrig which was equated with Euphemia, Dìorbhail with Dorothy, Beathag with Rebecca or Sophie.

Sophie

Sophy
This includes Oighrig which was equated with Euphemia, Dìorbhail with Dorothy, Beathag with Rebecca or Sophie.

Nominalization

nominalizednominalizernominalisation
Patronymic surnames for men feature either the mac (e.g. MacDhomhnaill) element or the nominalizing suffix (e.g. Domhnallach).