Scottish Parliament

ParliamentHolyroodScotlandThe Scottish ParliamentScottishdevolved parliamentHolyrood ParliamentScottish DevolutionScottish Parliament electionScottish parliamentary
The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba; Scots: Scots Pairlament) is the unicameral legislature of Scotland.wikipedia
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Edinburgh

Edinburgh, ScotlandCity of EdinburghEdinburgh, United Kingdom
Located in the Holyrood area of the capital city, Edinburgh, it is frequently referred to by the metonym Holyrood.
Recognised as the capital of Scotland since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba; Scots: Scots Pairlament) is the unicameral legislature of Scotland.
In 1997, a Scottish Parliament was re-established, in the form of a devolved unicameral legislature comprising 129 members, having authority over many areas of domestic policy.

2016 Scottish Parliament election

20162016 electionelection in May 2016
The most recent general election to the Parliament was held on 5 May 2016, with the Scottish National Party winning a plurality.
The 2016 Scottish parliament election was held on Thursday, 5 May 2016 to elect 129 members to the Scottish Parliament.

Member of the Scottish Parliament

MSPMember of the Scottish Parliament (MSP)Members of the Scottish Parliament
The Parliament is a democratically elected body comprising 129 members known as Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs), elected for four-year terms under the additional member system: 73 MSPs represent individual geographical constituencies elected by the plurality (‘first-past-the-post’) system, while a further 56 are returned from eight additional member regions, each electing seven MSPs.
Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP; Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba, BPA; Memmer o the Scots Pairliament, MSP) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament.

Scottish National Party

SNPScottish National Party (SNP) SNP
The most recent general election to the Parliament was held on 5 May 2016, with the Scottish National Party winning a plurality.
It is the third-largest political party by membership in the United Kingdom, behind the Labour Party and the Conservative Party; it is the third-largest by overall representation in the House of Commons, behind the Conservative Party and the Labour Party; and it is the largest political party in Scotland, where it has the most seats in the Scottish Parliament and 35 out of the 59 Scottish seats in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Scottish Parliament constituencies and regions

electoral regionconstituencyScottish Parliament constituencies
The Parliament is a democratically elected body comprising 129 members known as Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs), elected for four-year terms under the additional member system: 73 MSPs represent individual geographical constituencies elected by the plurality (‘first-past-the-post’) system, while a further 56 are returned from eight additional member regions, each electing seven MSPs.
Scottish Parliament constituencies and regions were first used in 1999, in the first general election of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood), created by the Scotland Act 1998.

Unicameralism

unicameralunicameral legislatureunicameral parliament
The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba; Scots: Scots Pairlament) is the unicameral legislature of Scotland.
In the United Kingdom, the devolved Scottish Parliament, National Assembly for Wales, London Assembly, and Northern Ireland Assembly are also unicameral.

1997 Scottish devolution referendum

1997 devolution referendumreferendum1997 referendum
Following a referendum in 1997, in which the Scottish electorate voted for devolution, the powers of the devolved legislature were specified by the Scotland Act 1998.
The Scottish devolution referendum of 1997 was a pre-legislative referendum held in Scotland on 11 September 1997 over whether there was support for the creation of a Scottish Parliament with devolved powers, and whether the Parliament should have tax-varying powers.

Reserved and excepted matters

reserved mattersreservedreserved matter
The Act delineates the legislative competence of the Parliament – the areas in which it can make laws – by explicitly specifying powers that are "reserved" to the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
Any matter not explicitly listed in the Act is implicitly devolved to the Scottish Parliament.

Scotland Act 1998

New ParliamentConstituency CreatedScotland Act
Following a referendum in 1997, in which the Scottish electorate voted for devolution, the powers of the devolved legislature were specified by the Scotland Act 1998.
46)''' is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which legislated for the establishment of the devolved Scottish Parliament with tax varying powers and the Scottish Government (then Scottish Executive).

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
The original Parliament of Scotland was the national legislature of the independent Kingdom of Scotland, and existed from the early 13th century until the Kingdom of Scotland merged with the Kingdom of England under the Acts of Union 1707 to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.
The websites of the Scottish Parliament, the BBC, and others, including the Historical Association, refer to the state created on 1 May 1707 as the United Kingdom of Great Britain.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
A sharp rise in nationalism in Scotland during the late 1960s fuelled demands for some form of home rule or complete independence, and in 1969 prompted the incumbent Labour government of Harold Wilson to set up the Kilbrandon Commission to consider the British constitution.
The party is the third-largest in the Scottish Parliament.

Acts of Union 1707

Act of UnionActs of UnionAct of Union 1707
The original Parliament of Scotland was the national legislature of the independent Kingdom of Scotland, and existed from the early 13th century until the Kingdom of Scotland merged with the Kingdom of England under the Acts of Union 1707 to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.
In Scotland, the Duke of Queensberry was largely responsible for the successful passage of the Union act by the Scottish Parliament.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, demand for a Scottish Parliament grew, in part because the government of the United Kingdom was controlled by the Conservative Party, while Scotland itself elected relatively few Conservative MPs.
It also has 234 members of the House of Lords, 4 members of the European Parliament, 31 Members of the Scottish Parliament, 11 members of the Welsh Assembly, 8 members of the London Assembly and 7,445 local councillors.

Holyrood, Edinburgh

HolyroodAn area in Edinburgh
Located in the Holyrood area of the capital city, Edinburgh, it is frequently referred to by the metonym Holyrood.

List of political parties in Scotland

political partypolitical partiespolitical party in Scotland
In the aftermath of the 1979 referendum defeat, the Campaign for a Scottish Assembly was initiated as a pressure group, leading to the 1989 Scottish Constitutional Convention with various organisations such as Scottish churches, political parties and representatives of industry taking part.
Parties represented in the Scottish Parliament, UK Parliament and European Parliament (ordered by number of representatives):

Scottish Parliament Building

HolyroodScottish ParliamentCanongate Wall
Since September 2004, the official home of the Scottish Parliament has been a new Scottish Parliament Building, in the Holyrood area of Edinburgh.
The Scottish Parliament Building (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba, Scots Pairlament Biggin) is the home of the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, within the UNESCO World Heritage Site in central Edinburgh.

Scottish Constitutional Convention

Campaign for a Scottish AssemblyScottish Conventionas there had been in Scotland
In the aftermath of the 1979 referendum defeat, the Campaign for a Scottish Assembly was initiated as a pressure group, leading to the 1989 Scottish Constitutional Convention with various organisations such as Scottish churches, political parties and representatives of industry taking part.
It is credited as having paved the way for the establishment of the Scottish Parliament in 1999.

Tony Blair

BlairTonyPrime Minister Tony Blair
Devolution continued to be part of the platform of the Labour Party which, in May 1997, took power under Tony Blair.
His government held referendums in which Scottish and Welsh electorates voted in favour of devolved administration, paving the way for the establishment of the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly (both 1999).

1979 Scottish devolution referendum

Scottish devolution referendumdevolution referendum1979 referendum
The 1979 Scottish devolution referendum failed: although the vote was 51.6% in favour of a Scottish Assembly, with a turnout of 63.6%, the majority represented only 32.9% of the eligible voting population.
A second referendum to create a devolved legislature in Scotland was held in 1997 under a newly elected Labour government, which led to the enactment of the Scotland Act 1998 and the creation of a devolved Scottish Parliament in 1999.

Constitution of the United Kingdom

British constitutionconstitutionEnglish constitution
A sharp rise in nationalism in Scotland during the late 1960s fuelled demands for some form of home rule or complete independence, and in 1969 prompted the incumbent Labour government of Harold Wilson to set up the Kilbrandon Commission to consider the British constitution.
Fourth, devolution in the United Kingdom has meant Parliament gave power to legislate on specific topics to nations and regions: the Scotland Act 1998 created the Scottish Parliament, the Government of Wales Act 1998 created the Welsh Assembly, the Northern Ireland Act 1998 created a Northern Ireland Executive following the historic Good Friday Agreement, to bring peace.

Scotland Act 2012

Scotland BillScotland Bill 20112012
The competence of the Scottish Parliament has been amended numerous times since then, most notably by the Scotland Act 2012 and Scotland Act 2016, with some of the most significant changes being the expansion of the Parliament's powers, especially over taxation and welfare.
The proposed legislation was based on the final report of the Calman Commission, which was established by an opposition Labour Party motion in the Scottish Parliament in December 2007, against the wishes of the Scottish National Party minority government.

Devolution

devolveddevolved governmentdevolve
Following a referendum in 1997, in which the Scottish electorate voted for devolution, the powers of the devolved legislature were specified by the Scotland Act 1998. A sharp rise in nationalism in Scotland during the late 1960s fuelled demands for some form of home rule or complete independence, and in 1969 prompted the incumbent Labour government of Harold Wilson to set up the Kilbrandon Commission to consider the British constitution.
Between 1998 and 1999, the Scottish Parliament, National Assembly for Wales, Northern Ireland Assembly and London Assembly were established by law.

Scotland Act 2016

2016expansionScotland Act of 2016
The competence of the Scottish Parliament has been amended numerous times since then, most notably by the Scotland Act 2012 and Scotland Act 2016, with some of the most significant changes being the expansion of the Parliament's powers, especially over taxation and welfare.
The act gives extra powers to the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish Government, most notably:

Scottish Assembly

ScottishAssemblyHome Rule
Kilbrandon published his report in 1973 recommending the establishment of a directly elected Scottish Assembly to legislate for the majority of domestic Scottish affairs.
Home rule for Scotland would not become a reality until 1999 following the Scotland Act 1998 establishing the Scottish Parliament.