Scottish highland dance

highland dancingHighland danceHighland dancersHighland dancerScottish Highland dancingHighlandHighland dancesHighland FlingScottish dancerScottish dancing
Highland dance or Highland dancing (dannsa Gàidhealach) is a style of competitive solo dancing developed in the Scottish Highlands in the 19th and 20th centuries in the context of competitions at public events such as the Highland games.wikipedia
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Highland games

Highland GatheringScottish Highland GamesGames
Highland dance or Highland dancing (dannsa Gàidhealach) is a style of competitive solo dancing developed in the Scottish Highlands in the 19th and 20th centuries in the context of competitions at public events such as the Highland games.
This event gathers the best competitive dancers from around the world who compete for the SOBHD sanctioned World Championship title.

Scottish country dance

Scottish country dancingCountry Dancecountry dances
Highland dance should not be confused with Scottish country dance, Irish dance, cèilidh dancing, step dance, or clog dance, although they may be demonstrated at presentations and present at social events.
Scottish country dancing (a social form of dance with two or more couples of dancers) should not be confused with Scottish highland dance (a solo form of dance).

Kilt

kiltskiltedScottish Kilt
The British central government's policy of cultural suppression against Highland culture culminated in 1747 when the Act of Proscription, which forbade the wearing of kilts by civilian males, went into effect. The Seann Triubhas means 'old trousers' in Gaelic and is romantically associated with the repeal of the proscription of the kilt by the English after the failed Jacobite Uprising of 1745. For National dances, female dancers may wear an 'aboyne' (after the Aboyne Highland Games, where women are not allowed to wear kilts for dancing to this day, and so an outfit was devised as an alternative).
Organisations that sanction and grade the competitions in Highland dancing and piping all have rules governing acceptable attire for the competitors.

Seann Triubhas

The Seann Triubhas means 'old trousers' in Gaelic and is romantically associated with the repeal of the proscription of the kilt by the English after the failed Jacobite Uprising of 1745.
The Seann Triubhas (, approximately ) is a Highland Dance.

Aboyne dress

aboyne
For National dances, female dancers may wear an 'aboyne' (after the Aboyne Highland Games, where women are not allowed to wear kilts for dancing to this day, and so an outfit was devised as an alternative).
The aboyne dress is the name given to the prescribed attire for female dancers in the Scottish national dances, such as the Flora MacDonald's fancy, the Scottish lilt, and others.

Dirk dance

The Highland Dirk Dance, in which the dancer flourishes the weapon, is often linked to the sword dance or dances called 'Mac an Fhorsair', (literally, 'the son of the Forester'), the 'Broad Sword Exercise' or the 'Bruicheath' (battle dance).
The dance is quite different in style from the better known Highland dances and in many ways imitates the use of a dirk in fighting.

Wilt Thou Go to the Barracks, Johnny?

At Highland games, the National dances include the Scottish Lilt, the Earl of Erroll, Blue Bonnets, Hielan' Laddie, the Scotch Measure, Flora MacDonald's Fancy, Village Maid and Barracks Johnny, which illustrate the history of dancing and other aspects of Scottish culture and history.
"Wilt Thou Go to the Barracks, Johnny?" is a traditional Scottish highland dance.

Earl of Erroll

Earl of Erroll (1452)Earls of ErrollCountess of Erroll
At Highland games, the National dances include the Scottish Lilt, the Earl of Erroll, Blue Bonnets, Hielan' Laddie, the Scotch Measure, Flora MacDonald's Fancy, Village Maid and Barracks Johnny, which illustrate the history of dancing and other aspects of Scottish culture and history.
Earl of Erroll is also the name of a Scottish highland dance, danced today at Highland games around the world.

Ghillies (dance)

GhilliesGhillie
Highland dancing is often performed to the accompaniment of Highland bagpipe music and dancers wear specialised shoes called ghillies.
They are used by women in Irish dance, by men in Scottish country dance, and by men and women in Highland dance.

Glengarry Highland Games

Canada's Glengarry Highland Games on the other hand is one of the largest dancing and piping events on the North American calendar.
The Glengarry Highland Games are primarily intended to be a showcase of traditional Scottish heavy events, Highland Dance, pipe and drum competitions.

Highland Fling

flingtraditional Scottish dance
One theory about the Highland Fling is that it was a dance of triumph at the end of a battle.
The Highland Fling is a solo Highland dance that gained popularity in the early 19th century.

Dance

dancerdancingdancers
Highland dance or Highland dancing (dannsa Gàidhealach) is a style of competitive solo dancing developed in the Scottish Highlands in the 19th and 20th centuries in the context of competitions at public events such as the Highland games.
Single-style competitions, such as; highland dance, dance team, and Irish dance, that only permit a single dance style.

Highland Laddie

Hielan' LaddieDonkey RidingThe Highland Laddie
At Highland games, the National dances include the Scottish Lilt, the Earl of Erroll, Blue Bonnets, Hielan' Laddie, the Scotch Measure, Flora MacDonald's Fancy, Village Maid and Barracks Johnny, which illustrate the history of dancing and other aspects of Scottish culture and history.
Highland Laddie is also the name of a dance in Scottish Highland dancing, of the "national dance" subtype.

Flora MacDonald

FloraFlora MacDonald's Fancy
At Highland games, the National dances include the Scottish Lilt, the Earl of Erroll, Blue Bonnets, Hielan' Laddie, the Scotch Measure, Flora MacDonald's Fancy, Village Maid and Barracks Johnny, which illustrate the history of dancing and other aspects of Scottish culture and history.
"Flora MacDonald's Fancy" is a Scottish highland dance choreographed in her honour, supposedly based on a dance she performed for Bonnie Prince Charlie.

Jabot (neckwear)

jabotjabotsrabat
Jackets in the 'Montrose' style are to be worn with a white lace jabot and, optionally, sleeve ruffles.
Jabots continue to be worn as part of the highest formal Scottish evening attire and a former part of Scottish highland dance costumes from the 1930s to the 1970s.

James Jamieson (dancer)

James Jamieson
James Jamieson (1920 – December 25, 1993) was a specialist in Highland dancing, best remembered for both performing in and restaging Agnes de Mille's Brigadoon.

Royal Military College of Canada Bands

pipe and drum bandsRoyal Military College of Canada Pipes and Drums
The Bands comprise distinct units : a Pipes and Drums (25 & 25), a brass and reed (which includes woodwinds as well as brass instruments) (40), Choir (20), Highland dancers (20), and a stage band (15–20).

Michael Clark (dancer)

Michael ClarkMichael Clark CompanyMichael Clark Dance Company
Clark was born in Aberdeen and began traditional Scottish dancing at the age of four.

Kevin Jackson (dancer)

Kevin Jackson
Kevin Jackson began dance lessons aged seven at the Shirley Farrell Academy of Dance in Western Australia, starting with Scottish highland and tap dance.

Tartan Day

National Tartan DayTartan Week
Tartan Days typically have parades of pipe bands, Highland dancing and other Scottish-themed events.

Earl of Erroll (reel)

Earl of Erroll
The Earl of Erroll is a Scottish highland dance sometimes danced today at Highland games around the world, as part of Scottish National dances repertoire.

Gareth Mitchelson

Gareth Mitchelson (born 7 April 1967 in Dundee) is a Scottish dancer.

Strathspey (dance)

strathspeystrathspeysdance
Because the strathspey rhythm has four strong beats to the bar, it is played quickly (generally ranging from 108 beats per minute, for Highland dance, up to 160 beats per minute, for step dance), and contains many dot-cut 'snaps', it is a rhythmically tense idiom.

Cape Breton fiddling

Cape BretonCape Breton fiddlerCape Breton fiddle music
Dance styles associated with the music are Cape Breton step dancing, Cape Breton square dancing (Iona style and Inverness style), and highland dancing.