Scotty Moore

ScottyScotty Moore bandWinfield "Scotty" Moore
Winfield Scott "Scotty" Moore III (December 27, 1931 – June 28, 2016) was an American guitarist and recording engineer.wikipedia
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Elvis Presley

ElvisPresleyGladys Presley
He is best known for backing Elvis Presley in the first part of his career, between 1954 and the beginning of Elvis's Hollywood years.
Presley, on rhythm acoustic guitar, and accompanied by lead guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black, was a pioneer of rockabilly, an uptempo, backbeat-driven fusion of country music and rhythm and blues.

Keith Richards

RichardsX-pensive WinosDirty Strangers
The Rolling Stones' lead guitarist Keith Richards has said of Moore, When I heard "Heartbreak Hotel", I knew what I wanted to do in life.
One of Richards' first guitar heroes was Elvis's guitarist Scotty Moore.

D. J. Fontana

D.J. FontanaDJ FontanaD J Fontana
Rock critic Dave Marsh credits Moore with the invention of power chording, on the 1957 Presley song "Jailhouse Rock", the intro of which Moore and drummer D.J. Fontana, according to the latter, "copped from a '40s swing version of 'The Anvil Chorus'."
The band included Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (bass), and Elvis Presley (rhythm guitar).

Heartbreak Hotel

(At the End of Lonely Street)song of the same name“Heartbreak Hotel
The Rolling Stones' lead guitarist Keith Richards has said of Moore, When I heard "Heartbreak Hotel", I knew what I wanted to do in life. Moore played on many of Presley's most famous recordings, including "That's All Right", "Good Rockin' Tonight", "Milk Cow Blues Boogie", "Baby Let's Play House", "Heartbreak Hotel", "Mystery Train", "Blue Suede Shoes", "Hound Dog", "Too Much", "Jailhouse Rock", and "Hard Headed Woman".
Guitar player Scotty Moore later commented, "It was a larger studio than Sun's and more regimented - they called everything by a tape number. We would sit around at Sun, eat hamburgers and then somebody would say, 'Let's try something.'"

Bill Black

Bill Black's ComboBill Black ComboBill
The trio was completed with the bass player Bill Black, who brought a "rhythmic propulsion" that much pleased Phillips.
In 1952, Black began playing in clubs and on radio shows with the guitarist Scotty Moore.

Power chord

power chordspowerchordfifth chord
Rock critic Dave Marsh credits Moore with the invention of power chording, on the 1957 Presley song "Jailhouse Rock", the intro of which Moore and drummer D.J. Fontana, according to the latter, "copped from a '40s swing version of 'The Anvil Chorus'."
Scotty Moore opened Elvis Presley's 1957 hit Jailhouse Rock with power chords.

The Blue Moon Boys

Blue Moon Boys
By his performance at the Louisiana Hayride in October 1954, Black and Moore were called the Blue Moon Boys.
The Blue Moon Boys were a band formed by Elvis Presley, guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black.

Memphis Music Hall of Fame

He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000, the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2007, and the Memphis Music Hall of Fame in 2015.

The Sun Sessions

Sun SessionsSun Studios session
In 1954, Moore and Black accompanied Elvis on what would become the first legendary Presley hit, the Sun Studios session cut of "That's All Right", a recording regarded as a seminal event in rock and roll history.
Phillips said that Presley was rehearsing with his band, Scotty Moore and Bill Black, when Presley started singing the song, a blues song written by Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup.

That's All Right

That's All Right (Mama)That's All Right MamaThat's Alright Mama
In 1954, Moore and Black accompanied Elvis on what would become the first legendary Presley hit, the Sun Studios session cut of "That's All Right", a recording regarded as a seminal event in rock and roll history. Moore played on many of Presley's most famous recordings, including "That's All Right", "Good Rockin' Tonight", "Milk Cow Blues Boogie", "Baby Let's Play House", "Heartbreak Hotel", "Mystery Train", "Blue Suede Shoes", "Hound Dog", "Too Much", "Jailhouse Rock", and "Hard Headed Woman".
The label reads "That's All Right" (omitting "Mama" from the original title), and names the performers as Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill.

Blue Moon of Kentucky

During the next few days, the trio recorded a bluegrass number, Bill Monroe's "Blue Moon of Kentucky", again in a distinctive style and employing a jury-rigged echo effect that Sam Phillips dubbed "slapback".
According to Scotty Moore:

Mystery Train

a songLove My Baby
Moore played on many of Presley's most famous recordings, including "That's All Right", "Good Rockin' Tonight", "Milk Cow Blues Boogie", "Baby Let's Play House", "Heartbreak Hotel", "Mystery Train", "Blue Suede Shoes", "Hound Dog", "Too Much", "Jailhouse Rock", and "Hard Headed Woman".
Sam Phillips at Sun Studios again produced the recording, and featured Presley on vocals and rhythm guitar, Scotty Moore on lead guitar, and Bill Black on bass.

Blue Suede Shoes

Blue Suede Shoes(2005 DSD Remaster)blue-suede-shoedZapatos de gamuza azul
Moore played on many of Presley's most famous recordings, including "That's All Right", "Good Rockin' Tonight", "Milk Cow Blues Boogie", "Baby Let's Play House", "Heartbreak Hotel", "Mystery Train", "Blue Suede Shoes", "Hound Dog", "Too Much", "Jailhouse Rock", and "Hard Headed Woman".
Presley's version features two guitar solos by Scotty Moore, with

Hound Dog (song)

Hound DogHaund DogHound Dawg
Moore played on many of Presley's most famous recordings, including "That's All Right", "Good Rockin' Tonight", "Milk Cow Blues Boogie", "Baby Let's Play House", "Heartbreak Hotel", "Mystery Train", "Blue Suede Shoes", "Hound Dog", "Too Much", "Jailhouse Rock", and "Hard Headed Woman".
Presley's guitarist Scotty Moore recalled: "When we heard them perform that night, we thought the song would be a good one for us to do as comic relief when we were on stage. We loved the way they did it. They had a piano player [Russ Conti] who stood up and played – and the way he did his legs they looked like rubber bands bending back and forth. Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller wrote the song for Big Mama Thornton, but Freddie and The Bell Boys had a different set of lyrics. Elvis got his lyrics from those guys. He knew the original lyrics but he didn't use them"." When asked about "Hound Dog", Presley's drummer D. J. Fontana admitted: "We took that from a band we saw in Vegas, Freddie Bell and the Bellboys.

Louisiana Hayride

The Louisiana HayrideLouisiana Hayride Performers
By his performance at the Louisiana Hayride in October 1954, Black and Moore were called the Blue Moon Boys.

G.I. Blues

film of the same nameG. I. Blues
Moore and the Blue Moon Boys performed (and have additional small walk-on and speaking roles) with Presley in four of his movies (Loving You, Jailhouse Rock, King Creole, and G.I. Blues) filmed in 1957, 1958 and 1960.

Rockabilly

neo-rockabillyrock-a-billyrockabillies
Moore's playing on his Gibson with his unique finger-picking style using a thumbpick, as on the Sun and early RCA Victor recordings, represented a move of the Chet Atkins style into a more rockabilly mode.
Scotty Moore remembers that, "You could play ... As long as you could play, say, the top eight or ten songs from country, pop, R&B. They didn't care what instruments you had, as long as people could dance."

Jailhouse Rock (film)

Jailhouse RockJailhouse Rock'' (film)movie of the same name
Moore and the Blue Moon Boys performed (and have additional small walk-on and speaking roles) with Presley in four of his movies (Loving You, Jailhouse Rock, King Creole, and G.I. Blues) filmed in 1957, 1958 and 1960.

Good Rocking Tonight

Good Rockin' TonightRockin' at MidnightGood Rockin
Moore played on many of Presley's most famous recordings, including "That's All Right", "Good Rockin' Tonight", "Milk Cow Blues Boogie", "Baby Let's Play House", "Heartbreak Hotel", "Mystery Train", "Blue Suede Shoes", "Hound Dog", "Too Much", "Jailhouse Rock", and "Hard Headed Woman".
Both sides of this second record featuring "Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill" "stiffed".

Elvis (1968 TV program)

68 Comeback SpecialElvisElvis Presley's '68 Comeback Special
Moore reunited with Fontana and Presley for the NBC television special known as the '68 Comeback Special, again with his Gibson Super 400, which was also played by Presley.
He called Presley's first backup musicians, Scotty Moore and DJ Fontana, to accentuate the nature of the singer's musical origins.

Loving You (1957 film)

Loving Youhis second filmLoving You'' (1957 film)
Moore and the Blue Moon Boys performed (and have additional small walk-on and speaking roles) with Presley in four of his movies (Loving You, Jailhouse Rock, King Creole, and G.I. Blues) filmed in 1957, 1958 and 1960.
The film features appearances by Presley's guitarist Scotty Moore, bassist Bill Black, drummer D.J. Fontana, and The Jordanaires.

Gadsden, Tennessee

Gadsden
It is the birthplace of Hall of Fame rock guitarist Scotty Moore, who played with Elvis Presley and Ricky Nelson.

Ray Butts EchoSonic

EchoSonic
One of the key pieces of equipment in Moore's sound on many of the recordings with Presley, besides his guitars, was the Ray Butts EchoSonic, first used by Chet Atkins, a guitar amplifier with a tape echo built in, which allowed him to take his trademark slapback echo on the road.
He built fewer than seventy of those amplifiers; one of them was bought by Sam Phillips and then used by Scotty Moore on every recording he made with Elvis Presley, from the 1955 hit song "Mystery Train" to the 1968 TV program Comeback Special.

Doug Poindexter

Starlight Wranglers
Scotty Moore co-wrote the songs "My Kind of Carrying On" and "Now She Cares No More" which were released as Sun 202 on Sun Records in 1954 when he was a member of the group Doug Poindexter and the Starlite Wranglers with Bill Black as the bassist.
Members of his band included Scotty Moore and Bill Black, before they started playing with Elvis Presley.

Delay (audio effect)

delaytape echotape delay
During the next few days, the trio recorded a bluegrass number, Bill Monroe's "Blue Moon of Kentucky", again in a distinctive style and employing a jury-rigged echo effect that Sam Phillips dubbed "slapback". One of the key pieces of equipment in Moore's sound on many of the recordings with Presley, besides his guitars, was the Ray Butts EchoSonic, first used by Chet Atkins, a guitar amplifier with a tape echo built in, which allowed him to take his trademark slapback echo on the road.
It is a portable guitar amplifier with a built-in tape echo, which became used widely in country music (Chet Atkins) and especially in rock and roll (Scotty Moore).