Seaslug (missile)

Seaslug Mk. II missile
Seaslug on display at Wickenby Aerodrome, Lincolnshire, UK
Test firing from the trials ship HMS Girdle Ness (A387), circa 1961.
The Seaslug launcher mounted on the quarterdeck of HMS Glamorgan, circa 1972
The firing of the first Seaslug test missile from HMS Girdle Ness (A387). This version is based on the RAE's early GPV, and retains the rear-mounted boosters before they moved forward on the "long round".
Map with Seaslug operators in blue

First-generation surface-to-air missile designed by Armstrong Whitworth for use by the Royal Navy.

- Seaslug (missile)
Seaslug Mk. II missile

18 related topics

Alpha

A Fireflash missile at the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford (2014)

Fireflash

The United Kingdom's first air-to-air guided missile to see service with the Royal Air Force.

The United Kingdom's first air-to-air guided missile to see service with the Royal Air Force.

A Fireflash missile at the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford (2014)
A Supermarine Swift with two Fireflash missiles (1956)
Drawing of a Fireflash missile

In the immediately following period, a rationalized development program was laid out that called for the development of a surface-to-air missile (SAM) for the Royal Navy that became Seaslug, a similar SAM design for the British Army and Royal Air Force known by the code name "Red Heathen", the Blue Boar anti-shipping bomb, and ongoing development of Red Hawk.

London leads Antrim and Norfolk during exercises in 1971

County-class destroyer

Class of British guided missile destroyers, the first such warships built by the Royal Navy.

Class of British guided missile destroyers, the first such warships built by the Royal Navy.

London leads Antrim and Norfolk during exercises in 1971
HMS Norfolk, a Batch 2 ship, following modification that removed the 'B' turret and replaced it with four Exocet launcher boxes

Designed specifically around the Seaslug anti-aircraft missile system, the primary role of these ships was area air defence around the aircraft carrier task force in the nuclear-war environment.

Fairey Aviation Company

British aircraft manufacturer of the first half of the 20th century based in Hayes in Middlesex and Heaton Chapel and RAF Ringway in Cheshire.

British aircraft manufacturer of the first half of the 20th century based in Hayes in Middlesex and Heaton Chapel and RAF Ringway in Cheshire.

Stockport/Ringway-built Fairey Barracuda TF.V at Manchester Airport in May 1946
Fairey Stockport/Ringway-built Gannet AS.4 in 1956
Fairey Air Surveys Douglas DC-3 outside Fairey's 1937-built hangar at Manchester Airport during servicing in 1975
A Fairey mechanical overdrive, as fitted to an early Range Rover

Fairey Rocket Test Vehicle 1, formerly known as LOPGAP ("Liquid Oxygen and Petrol Guided Anti-Aircraft Projectile").

The United Kingdom Minister of Defence, Duncan Sandys (centre) meets with Howard Beale (right), the Australian Minister for Supply in August 1957.

British nuclear tests at Maralinga

Between 1956 and 1963, the United Kingdom conducted seven nuclear tests at the Maralinga site in South Australia, part of the Woomera Prohibited Area about 800 km north west of Adelaide.

Between 1956 and 1963, the United Kingdom conducted seven nuclear tests at the Maralinga site in South Australia, part of the Woomera Prohibited Area about 800 km north west of Adelaide.

The United Kingdom Minister of Defence, Duncan Sandys (centre) meets with Howard Beale (right), the Australian Minister for Supply in August 1957.
Emu-Ooldea-Tietkens Well reconnaissance
Cutting a temporary access road from Watson to Tietkens Well
Maralinga Committee visits the site. Butement is third from the left.
Giles Weather Station in 1955. The 44-gallon drums hold bore water.
A DC3 lands at the 43 mi airstrip at Maralinga
John L Stanier at Maralinga in protective clothing with a camera protected in a special plastic cover
Buffalo R1/One Tree nuclear test
Buffalo R2/Marcoo nuclear test
Buffalo R3/Kite nuclear test
Atomic test site at Maralinga – Workshops
Maralinga village from the north-east
Map of the Maralinga site, with major test areas (blue) and minor trials areas (red)
Kittens and Tim Operation – 43 Mile Camp – Instrumentation
Kittens and Tim Operation – 43 Mile Camp – Trials area
Kittens and Tim Operation – 43 Mile Camp – Trials area – setting up instrumentation
Souvenir necktie for staff of Maralinga

Pixie was an even smaller, lightweight (250 lb) warhead with a plutonium core under consideration for use with the Royal Navy's Seaslug missile.

The platform: triple missile launcher to the left, Type 901 radar on the right

Clausen Rolling Platform

Missile launching platform, built at the coastal missile test range of RAE Aberporth, West Wales, in the 1950s.

Missile launching platform, built at the coastal missile test range of RAE Aberporth, West Wales, in the 1950s.

The platform: triple missile launcher to the left, Type 901 radar on the right

The Platform was first used for development trials of the Seaslug missile.

HMS Victorious was the first ship to use the CDS. The Type 984 radar that fed data to the CDS can be seen mounted in front of the funnel.

Comprehensive Display System

Command, control, and coordination system of the British Royal Navy (RN) that worked with the detection/search Type 984 radar.

Command, control, and coordination system of the British Royal Navy (RN) that worked with the detection/search Type 984 radar.

HMS Victorious was the first ship to use the CDS. The Type 984 radar that fed data to the CDS can be seen mounted in front of the funnel.

However, the development of the Seaslug missile set off a series of events that led to the introduction of CDS some years later.

Testing on the Clausen Rolling Platform at Aberporth: triple missile launcher to the left, Type 901 radar on the right

Type 901 radar

Testing on the Clausen Rolling Platform at Aberporth: triple missile launcher to the left, Type 901 radar on the right

The Royal Navy's Type 901 X-band radar was used as the beam-riding command guidance system for the Seaslug missile system, which was the first such system used by the Royal Navy.

The Space Shuttle was launched with the help of two solid-fuel boosters known as SRBs

Summerfield Research Station

Development and production site for solid rocket motors in the United Kingdom officially formed on 1 September 1951 by the Ministry of Supply.

Development and production site for solid rocket motors in the United Kingdom officially formed on 1 September 1951 by the Ministry of Supply.

The Space Shuttle was launched with the help of two solid-fuel boosters known as SRBs

Among its early successes was a motor design for the Sea Slug missile, which allowed that design to switch from a liquid fuel rocket, considered a hazard on ships.