A report on Season

Tropical dry season in Maharashtra, India
Tropical wet season/monsoon in Maharashtra, India
Illumination of Earth at each change of astronomical season
This diagram shows how the tilt of Earth's axis aligns with incoming sunlight around the winter solstice of the Northern Hemisphere. Regardless of the time of day (i.e. the Earth's rotation on its axis), the North Pole will be dark and the South Pole will be illuminated; see also arctic winter. In addition to the density of incident light, the dissipation of light in the atmosphere is greater when it falls at a shallow angle.
Animation of seasonal differences especially snow cover through the year
Four Seasons by Alphonse Mucha (1897)
Four temperate and subpolar seasons: (above) winter, spring, (below) summer, autumn/fall
Note: Distances are exaggerated and not to scale
The annual cycle of insolation (Sun energy, shown in blue) with key points for seasons (middle), quarter days (top) and cross-quarter days (bottom) along with months (lower) and Zodiac houses (upper). The cycle of temperature (shown in pink) is delayed by seasonal lag.
The six modern mid-latitude ecological seasons. From bottom, clockwise: prevernal, vernal, estival, serotinal, autumnal, hibernal
Wet and dry seasons
Illumination of Earth by Sun at the northern solstice.
Illumination of Earth by Sun at the southern solstice.
Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the north. Far right: southern solstice
Two images showing the amount of reflected sunlight at southern and northern summer solstices respectively (watts / m{{sup|2}}).

Division of the year based on changes in weather, ecology, and the number of daylight hours in a given region.

- Season
Tropical dry season in Maharashtra, India

29 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Blooming flowers and trees in spring

Spring (season)

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Blooming flowers and trees in spring
Hundreds of sour cherry blooming in Extremadura, Spain, during spring
Late April in the Alps. At high elevations (or latitudes), spring is often the snowiest period of the year.
A willow in Stockholm in April 2016
Sowing at spring in Estonia
Holi in Nepal
Easter procession, commemorating the Resurrection of Jesus

Spring, also known as springtime, is one of the four temperate seasons, succeeding winter and preceding summer.

Summer in Belgium

Summer

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Summer in Belgium
In the middle of summer, the sun can appear even at midnight in the northern hemisphere. Photo of midnight sun in Inari, Finland.
Wet season thunderstorm at night in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.
Image of Hurricane Lester from late August 1992.
Hotels and tourists along the Atlantic Ocean shoreline in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina in summer
Children cycling during summer
Barefoot skiing
Fig trees bear fruit when summer is near
Using a handheld fan in summer
Summer is usually the season of travel, swimming, summer vacation for many people, and also the season for fruits and plants to fully develop.

Summer is the hottest of the four temperate seasons, occurring after spring and before autumn.

Forest covered in snow during Winter

Winter

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Forest covered in snow during Winter
Animation of snow cover changing with the seasons
In the mid-latitudes and polar regions, winter is associated with snow and ice.
In the Southern Hemisphere winter extends from June to September, pictured in Caxias do Sul in the southern highlands of Brazil.
Sea ice in the Port of Hamburg, Germany
The snowshoe hare, and some other animals, change color in winter.
River Thames frost fair, 1683, with Old London Bridge in the background
People enjoying the winter weather outdoors in Helsinki, Finland
Allegory of Winter by Jerzy Siemiginowski-Eleuter with Aeolus' Kingdom of the Winds, 1683, Wilanów Palace

Winter is the coldest season of the year in polar and temperate climates.

Leaves often turn orange and fall off from trees in the autumn.

Autumn

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Leaves often turn orange and fall off from trees in the autumn.
Autumnal scene with yellow, orange and red leaves on trees and fallen on the ground
"Jesień" (Autumn) Józef Chełmoński picture of 1875 presenting a typical view of autumn in Polish 19th century countryside
Autumn coloration at the Kalevanpuisto park in Pori, Finland.
Maple leaves changing colour by a creek.
Pumpkin pie is commonly served on and around Thanksgiving in North America
All Saints' Day at a cemetery in Sanok – flowers and lit candles are placed to honor the memory of deceased relatives.
Harvest straw bales in a field of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Halloween pumpkins
Autumn in Sedniv, Ukraine
Autumn, by Giuseppe Collignon
Autumn, by Pierre Le Gros the Elder
Autumn (1573), by Giuseppe Arcimboldo
Autumn (1896), by Art Nouveau artist Alphonse Mucha
Autumn (1871), by Currier & Ives
This 1905 print by Maxfield Frederick Parrish illustrated John Keats' poem Autumn

Autumn, also known as fall in North American English, is one of the four temperate seasons.

Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of an equinox

March equinox

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Equinox on the Earth when the subsolar point appears to leave the Southern Hemisphere and cross the celestial equator, heading northward as seen from Earth.

Equinox on the Earth when the subsolar point appears to leave the Southern Hemisphere and cross the celestial equator, heading northward as seen from Earth.

Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of an equinox
Bas-relief in Persepolis, a symbol of Iranian Nowruz: a bull (symbolizing the Earth) and lion (the Sun) in eternal combat are equal in power on the equinox.
Chichen Itza during the spring equinox—Kukulkan, the famous descent of the snake
equinox at the site of Pizzo Vento, Fondachelli Fantina, Sicily

The March equinox may be taken to mark the beginning of astronomical spring and the end of astronomical winter in the Northern Hemisphere but marks the beginning of astronomical autumn and the end of astronomical summer in the Southern Hemisphere.

The Wheel of the Year in the Northern Hemisphere. Some Pagans in the Southern Hemisphere advance these dates six months to coincide with their own seasons.

Wheel of the Year

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The Wheel of the Year in the Northern Hemisphere. Some Pagans in the Southern Hemisphere advance these dates six months to coincide with their own seasons.
A different depiction of the Wheel of the Year, again from the perspective of the Northern Hemisphere
Illustration of a Witches' Sabbath, "Darstellung des Hexensabbats" from the Wickiana, circa 1570.
The Witches' Cottage, where the Bricket Wood coven celebrated their sabbats (2006).
The eight-armed sun cross is often used to represent the Neopagan Wheel of the Year.
The annual cycle of insolation for the northern hemisphere (Sun energy, shown in blue) with key points for seasons (middle), quarter days (top) and cross-quarter days (bottom) along with months (lower) and Zodiac houses (upper). The cycle of temperature (shown in pink) is delayed by seasonal lag.
Neopagans honoring the dead as part of a Samhain ritual
Holidays of the Ásatrú Alliance 
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Romuva ceremony
Kołomir – the Slavic example of Wheel of the Year indicating seasons of the year. Four-point and eight-point swastika-shaped wheels were more common.
Painted Wheel of the Year from the Museum of Witchcraft, Boscastle.

The Wheel of the Year is an annual cycle of seasonal festivals, observed by many modern Pagans, consisting of the year's chief solar events (solstices and equinoxes) and the midpoints between them.

Countries and territories that touch the Equator (red) or the prime meridian (blue), which intersect at "Null Island".

Equator

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Circle of latitude, about 40,075 km in circumference, that divides Earth into the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

Circle of latitude, about 40,075 km in circumference, that divides Earth into the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

Countries and territories that touch the Equator (red) or the prime meridian (blue), which intersect at "Null Island".
Road sign marking the equator near Nanyuki, Kenya
The equator marked as it crosses Ilhéu das Rolas, in São Tomé and Príncipe
The Marco Zero monument marking the equator in Macapá, Brazil
GPS reading taken on the Equator close to the Quitsato Sundial, in Cayambe, Ecuador
Diagram of the seasons, depicting the situation at the December solstice. Regardless of the time of day (i.e. Earth's rotation on its axis), the North Pole will be dark, and the South Pole will be illuminated; see also polar night. In addition to the density of incident light, the dissipation of light in atmosphere is greater when it falls at a shallow angle.

In the cycle of Earth's seasons, the equatorial plane runs through the Sun twice a year: on the equinoxes in March and September.

Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) is currently about 23.4°.

Axial tilt

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Angle between an object's rotational axis and its orbital axis, which is the line perpendicular to its orbital plane; equivalently, it is the angle between its equatorial plane and orbital plane.

Angle between an object's rotational axis and its orbital axis, which is the line perpendicular to its orbital plane; equivalently, it is the angle between its equatorial plane and orbital plane.

Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) is currently about 23.4°.
The positive pole of a planet is defined by the right-hand rule: if the fingers of the right hand are curled in the direction of the rotation then the thumb points to the positive pole. The axial tilt is defined as the angle between the direction of the positive pole and the normal to the orbital plane. The angles for Earth, Uranus, and Venus are approximately 23°, 97°, and 177° respectively.
The axis of Earth remains oriented in the same direction with reference to the background stars regardless of where it is in its orbit. Northern hemisphere summer occurs at the right side of this diagram, where the north pole (red) is directed toward the Sun, winter at the left.
Relationship between Earth's axial tilt (ε) to the tropical and polar circles
Obliquity of the ecliptic for 20,000 years, from Laskar (1986). The red point represents the year 2000.

This causes one pole to be pointed more toward the Sun on one side of the orbit, and more away from the Sun on the other side—the cause of the seasons on Earth.

A solargraph taken from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment at the Llano de Chajnantor Observatory in the southern hemisphere. This is a long-exposure photograph, with the image exposed for six months in a direction facing east of north, from mid-December 2009 until the southern winter solstice in June 2010. The Sun's path each day can be seen from right to left in this image across the sky; the path of the following day runs slightly lower until the day of the winter solstice, whose path is the lowest one in the image.

Solstice

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Event that occurs when the Sun appears to reach its most northerly or southerly excursion relative to the celestial equator on the celestial sphere.

Event that occurs when the Sun appears to reach its most northerly or southerly excursion relative to the celestial equator on the celestial sphere.

A solargraph taken from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment at the Llano de Chajnantor Observatory in the southern hemisphere. This is a long-exposure photograph, with the image exposed for six months in a direction facing east of north, from mid-December 2009 until the southern winter solstice in June 2010. The Sun's path each day can be seen from right to left in this image across the sky; the path of the following day runs slightly lower until the day of the winter solstice, whose path is the lowest one in the image.
2005 Summer Solstice Sunrise over Stonehenge
Orientation of the terminator (division between night and day) depends on the season.
Illumination of Earth by Sun on 21 June. The orientation of the terminator shown with respect to the Earth's orbital plane.
Illumination of Earth by Sun on 21 December. The orientation of the terminator shown with respect to the Earth's orbital plane.
Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the north. Far right: southern solstice
Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the south. Far left: northern solstice
The globe on an equirectangular projection to show the amount of reflected sunlight at southern and northern summer solstices, respectively (watts / m{{sup|2}}).

In many countries, the seasons of the year are determined by reference to the solstices and the equinoxes.

World map with the intertropical zone highlighted in crimson

Tropics

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The tropics are the regions of Earth surrounding the Equator.

The tropics are the regions of Earth surrounding the Equator.

World map with the intertropical zone highlighted in crimson
Areas of the world with tropical climates
A graph showing the zonally averaged monthly precipitation. The tropics receive more precipitation than higher latitudes. The precipitation maximum, which follows the solar equator through the year, is under the rising branch of the Hadley circulation; the sub-tropical minima are under the descending branch and cause the desert areas.
Aerial view of Bora Bora, French Polynesia
Tropical sunset over the sea in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
Coconut palms in the warm, tropical climate of northern Brazil
Distribution of tropical wet forests
Juruá River in Brazil surrounded by dense tropical rainforests. The Brazilian rainforests are home to uncontacted tribes to this day.

In terms of climate, the tropics receive sunlight that is more direct than the rest of Earth and are generally hotter and wetter as they aren't affected as much by the solar seasons.