Sebaceous gland

sebumsebaceous glandssebaceouspilosebaceous unitgular-thoracic glandoil glandporesseborrhoeahuman skin oilsoil
Sebaceous glands are microscopic exocrine glands in the skin that secrete an oily or waxy matter, called sebum, to lubricate and waterproof the skin and hair of mammals.wikipedia
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Fordyce spots

Fordyce spots are ectopic (misplaced) sebaceous glands found usually on the lips, gums and inner cheeks, and genitals.
Fordyce spots (also termed Fordyce granules) are visible sebaceous glands that are present in most individuals.

Exocrine gland

exocrineexocrine glandssecretory gland
Sebaceous glands are microscopic exocrine glands in the skin that secrete an oily or waxy matter, called sebum, to lubricate and waterproof the skin and hair of mammals.
Examples of exocrine glands include sweat, salivary, mammary, ceruminous, lacrimal, sebaceous, and mucous.

Sole (foot)

solesolessole of the foot
In humans, they occur in the greatest number on the face and scalp, but also on all parts of the skin except the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.
Like those of the palm, the sweat pores of the sole lack sebaceous glands.

Sebaceous cyst

epithelial cystsebaceous cystswen
Several related medical conditions involve sebum—including acne, sebaceous cysts, hyperplasia, and sebaceous adenoma.
Both of the above types of cyst contain keratin, not sebum, and neither originates from sebaceous glands.

Sebaceous hyperplasia

hyperplasia
Several related medical conditions involve sebum—including acne, sebaceous cysts, hyperplasia, and sebaceous adenoma.
Sebaceous hyperplasia is a disorder of the sebaceous glands in which they become enlarged, producing flesh-colored or yellowish, shiny, often umbilicated bumps on the face.

Hair

glabrousglabrescenthuman hair
Sebaceous glands are microscopic exocrine glands in the skin that secrete an oily or waxy matter, called sebum, to lubricate and waterproof the skin and hair of mammals. Sebaceous glands are also found in hairless areas (glabrous skin) of the eyelids, nose, penis, labia minora, the inner mucosal membrane of the cheek, and nipples.
Other structures of the hair follicle include the oil producing sebaceous gland which lubricates the hair and the arrector pili muscles, which are responsible for causing hairs to stand up. In humans with little body hair, the effect results in goose bumps.

Skin

cutaneousskin cellanimal skin
Sebaceous glands are microscopic exocrine glands in the skin that secrete an oily or waxy matter, called sebum, to lubricate and waterproof the skin and hair of mammals. In humans, they occur in the greatest number on the face and scalp, but also on all parts of the skin except the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.
It also contains the hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, apocrine glands, lymphatic vessels and blood vessels.

Human nose

nosenasalala of the nose
Sebaceous glands are also found in hairless areas (glabrous skin) of the eyelids, nose, penis, labia minora, the inner mucosal membrane of the cheek, and nipples.
The nose is also made up of types of soft tissue such as skin, epithelia, mucous membrane, muscles, nerves, and blood, and in the skin there are sebaceous glands.

Areolar gland

Montgomery's glands
Areolar glands surround the female nipples.
Areolar glands or Glands of Montgomery are sebaceous glands in the areola surrounding the nipple.

Hair follicle

hair folliclesfolliclefollicles
There are two types of sebaceous gland, those connected to hair follicles, in pilosebaceous units, and those that exist independently.
Anatomically, the triad of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and arrector pili muscle make up the pilosebaceous unit.

Vernix caseosa

vernixwhite stickiness
The sebaceous glands of a human fetus secrete a substance called vernix caseosa, a waxy, translucent white substance coating the skin of newborns.
Vernix has a highly variable makeup but is primarily composed of sebum, cells that have sloughed off the fetus's skin and shed lanugo hair.

Gland

glandsglandularglandular tissue
Sebaceous glands are microscopic exocrine glands in the skin that secrete an oily or waxy matter, called sebum, to lubricate and waterproof the skin and hair of mammals.
Holocrine glands the entire cell disintegrates to secrete its substances. e.g. sebaceous glands : meibomian and zeis glands.

Triglyceride

triglyceridestriacylglyceroltriacylglyceride
Sebaceous glands secrete the oily, waxy substance called sebum (fat, tallow) that is made of triglycerides, wax esters, squalene, and metabolites of fat-producing cells.
They are also present in the blood to enable the bidirectional transference of adipose fat and blood glucose from the liver, and are a major component of human skin oils.

Androgen

androgensandrogenicmale hormones
After birth, activity of the glands decreases until there is almost no activity during ages 2–6 years, and then increases to a peak of activity during puberty, due to heightened levels of androgens. Sex steroids are known to affect the rate of sebum secretion; androgens such as testosterone have been shown to stimulate secretion, and estrogens have been shown to inhibit secretion.
In adulthood, DHT contributes to balding, prostate growth, and sebaceous gland activity.

Labia minora

inner labiainner vaginal lipslabia
Sebaceous glands are also found in hairless areas (glabrous skin) of the eyelids, nose, penis, labia minora, the inner mucosal membrane of the cheek, and nipples.
On the opposed surfaces of the labia minora are numerous sebaceous glands not associated with hair follicles.

Acinus

aciniacinarAcinar cell
The glands have an acinar structure (like a many-lobed berry), in which multiple glands branch off a central duct.
the sebaceous gland of the scalp

Sapienic acid

Sapienic acid is a sebum fatty acid that is unique to humans, and is implicated in the development of acne.
Sapienic acid (16:1, n-10, cis-6 hexadecenoic, or sapienate) is a fatty acid that is a major component of human sebum.

Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

CFTRCFTR geneCF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)
These cells express Na + and Cl − ion channels, ENaC and CFTR (see Fig.
In the skin CFTR is strongly expressed in the sebaceous and eccrine sweat glands.

Testosterone

low testosterone levels due to agingmetabolismprenatal exposure to androgens
Sex steroids are known to affect the rate of sebum secretion; androgens such as testosterone have been shown to stimulate secretion, and estrogens have been shown to inhibit secretion.
Enlargement of sebaceous glands.

Gland of Zeis

glands of ZeisZeiszeis gland
The meibomian glands are also known as tarsal glands, Zeis glands and palpebral glands.
Glands of Zeis are unilobar sebaceous glands located on the margin of the eyelid.

Acne

acne vulgariscystic acneblemishes
Several related medical conditions involve sebum—including acne, sebaceous cysts, hyperplasia, and sebaceous adenoma.
Acne, also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when hair follicles are clogged with dead skin cells and oil from the skin.

Earwax

cerumenear waxABCC11
Earwax is partly composed of sebum produced by glands in the ear canal.
Earwax consists of shed skin cells, hair, and the secretions of the ceruminous and sebaceous glands of the outside ear canal.

Puberty

pubescentpubescencesexual development
After birth, activity of the glands decreases until there is almost no activity during ages 2–6 years, and then increases to a peak of activity during puberty, due to heightened levels of androgens.
Another androgen effect is increased secretion of oil (sebum) from the skin.

Eyelid

eyelidspalpebralpalpebra
Sebaceous glands are also found in hairless areas (glabrous skin) of the eyelids, nose, penis, labia minora, the inner mucosal membrane of the cheek, and nipples.
The skin of the eyelid contains the greatest concentration of sebaceous glands found anywhere in the body.

Arrector pili muscle

arrector piliarrector pilliarrectores pilorum
One or more glands may surround each hair follicle, and the glands themselves are surrounded by arrector pili muscles.
Pressure exerted by the muscle may cause sebum to be forced along the hair follicle towards the surface, protecting the hair.