A report on Second Battle of Bull Run

Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

Fought August 28–30, 1862, in Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the American Civil War.

- Second Battle of Bull Run
Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

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J. E. B. Stuart

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United States Army officer from Virginia who became a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War.

United States Army officer from Virginia who became a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War.

Laurel Hill Farm overview, 2017
A young Stuart
Stonewall Jackson assigned Stuart to cavalry.
CSA Cavalry General J.E.B. Stuart
Stuart's hat, sword and LeMat Revolver (Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond, VA)
Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863
Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863
Stuart's ride (shown with a red dotted line) during the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3 – July 3, 1863
Bristoe Campaign
The 1864 Overland Campaign, including the Battle of Yellow Tavern
"Dorsey...save your men".
Stuart's gravesite after the war, with temporary marker
Gravesite of Jeb and Flora Stuart, Hollywood Cemetery
M3A1 Stuart tank
Southern Troopers Song, Dedicated to Gen'l. J. E. B. Stuart and his gallant Soldiers, Sheet music, Danville, Virginia, c. 1864

At the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas), Stuart's cavalry followed the massive assault by Longstreet's infantry against Pope's army, protecting its flank with artillery batteries.

Portrait by Alexander Gardner, November 1863

Abraham Lincoln

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American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until his assassination in 1865.

American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until his assassination in 1865.

Portrait by Alexander Gardner, November 1863
The farm site where Lincoln grew up in Spencer County, Indiana
Lincoln's home in Springfield, Illinois
Lincoln in his late 30s as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Photo taken by one of Lincoln's law students around 1846.
Lincoln in 1857
Lincoln in 1858, the year of his debates with Stephen Douglas over slavery
A portrait of Dred Scott, petitioner in Dred Scott v. Sandford
Abraham Lincoln (1860) by Mathew Brady, taken the day of the Cooper Union speech
A Timothy Cole wood engraving taken from a May 20, 1860, ambrotype of Lincoln, two days following his nomination for president
Headlines on the day of Lincoln's inauguration portended hostilities with the Confederacy, Fort Sumter being attacked less than six weeks later.
March 1861 inaugural at the Capitol building. The dome above the rotunda was still under construction.
Lincoln with officers after the Battle of Antietam. Notable figures (from left) are 1. Col. Delos Sackett; 4. Gen. George W. Morell; 5. Alexander S. Webb, Chief of Staff, V Corps; 6. McClellan;. 8. Dr. Jonathan Letterman; 10. Lincoln; 11. Henry J. Hunt; 12. Fitz John Porter; 15. Andrew A. Humphreys; 16. Capt. George Armstrong Custer.
Running the Machine: An 1864 political cartoon satirizing Lincoln's administration – featuring William Fessenden, Edwin Stanton, William Seward, Gideon Welles, Lincoln, and others
Lincoln and McClellan
Lincoln, absent his usual top hat, is highlighted at Gettysburg.
An electoral landslide for Lincoln (in red) in the 1864 election; southern states (brown) and territories (gray) not in play
A poster of the 1864 election campaign with Lincoln as the candidate for president and Andrew Johnson as the candidate for vice president
Lincoln's second inaugural address in 1865 at the almost completed Capitol building
A political cartoon of Vice President Andrew Johnson (a former tailor) and Lincoln, 1865, entitled The 'Rail Splitter' At Work Repairing the Union. The caption reads (Johnson): "Take it quietly Uncle Abe and I will draw it closer than ever." (Lincoln): "A few more stitches Andy and the good old Union will be mended."
Shown in the presidential booth of Ford's Theatre, from left to right, are assassin John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, Clara Harris, and Henry Rathbone.
Funeral of Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln, painting by George Peter Alexander Healy in 1869
Lincoln in February 1865, two months before his death
Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.
The Lincoln cent, an American coin portraying Lincoln
Lincoln's image carved into the stone of Mount Rushmore|alt=See caption
Abraham Lincoln, a 1909 bronze statue by Adolph Weinman, sits before a historic church in Hodgenville, Kentucky.|alt=See caption
The Lincoln memorial postage stamp of 1866 was issued by the U.S. Post Office exactly one year after Lincoln's death.
Painting of Abraham Lincoln for the U.S. Capitol, by Ned Bittinger

But Pope was then soundly defeated at the Second Battle of Bull Run in the summer of 1862, forcing the Army of the Potomac back to defend Washington.

Centreville, Virginia

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Census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States and a suburb of Washington, D.C. The population was 74,230 at the 2020 census.

Census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States and a suburb of Washington, D.C. The population was 74,230 at the 2020 census.

Main street and church guarded by Union soldiers, Centreville, Virginia, May 1862 (#302 Photograph by Civil War photographers George N. Barnard and James F. Gibson)
"Departure from the old Homestead" Pro-union refugees, Centreville, Virginia, 1862 (#306 Photograph by George N. Barnard)
Location of Centreville, Virginia
US 29 in Centreville
Centreville Regional Library

In the American Civil War, several battles were fought nearby including the First Battle of Manassas, the Second Battle of Manassas, and the Battle of Chantilly.

General George Sykes

George Sykes

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Career United States Army officer and a Union General during the American Civil War.

Career United States Army officer and a Union General during the American Civil War.

General George Sykes
General Sykes and his staff
Commanders of the Army of the Potomac: Gouverneur K. Warren, William H. French, George G. Meade, Henry J. Hunt, Andrew A. Humphreys and George Sykes in September 1863

During the Civil War, he was appointed commander of the 2nd Division of the V Corps of the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsula Campaign of 1862, and continued in that role through the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Antietam, the Battle of Fredericksburg, and the Battle of Chancellorsville.

Portrait by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy

Joseph Hooker

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American Civil War general for the Union, chiefly remembered for his decisive defeat by Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863.

American Civil War general for the Union, chiefly remembered for his decisive defeat by Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863.

Portrait by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy
Hooker in an 1863 engraving
Major General Joseph Hooker, 1862. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Photograph by Mathew Brady
Major General Joseph Hooker
General "Fightin' Joe" Hooker
Union General Joseph Hooker (seated 2nd to right) and his staff, 1863
Olivia Groesbeck Hooker
Hooker and his staff at Lookout Mountain
Hooker's equestrian statue at Massachusetts State House
General Hooker's Quickstep, sheet music, 19th century

During the Second Battle of Bull Run, the III Corps was sent to reinforce John Pope's Army of Virginia.

John Bell Hood

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Confederate general during the American Civil War.

Confederate general during the American Civil War.

Hood's birthplace
Confederate general John Bell Hood
Map of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign
Confederate
Union

At Second Bull Run, Hood spearheaded the assault on the Union left flank that forced them to retreat from the field.

Jubal Early

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Virginia lawyer and politician who became a Confederate general during the American Civil War.

Virginia lawyer and politician who became a Confederate general during the American Civil War.

Early's childhood home in northeastern Franklin County
Confederate General Jubal A. Early
General Early, disguised as a farmer, while escaping to Mexico, 1865
Early in his elder years
A plaque praising Early in Rocky Mount, Virginia

As general, Early led Confederate troops in most of the major battles in the Eastern Theater, including the Seven Days Battles, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and numerous battles in the Shenandoah Valley.

Brig. Gen. Nathaniel McLean

Nathaniel McLean

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Lawyer, farmer, and Union general during the American Civil War.

Lawyer, farmer, and Union general during the American Civil War.

Brig. Gen. Nathaniel McLean

During the Second Battle of Bull Run, his brigade's determined defense of Chinn Ridge probably saved the Union Army from a disaster.

Kanawha Division

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Union Army division which could trace its origins back to a brigade originally commanded by Jacob D. Cox.

Union Army division which could trace its origins back to a brigade originally commanded by Jacob D. Cox.

In preparation for the upcoming battle of Second Bull Run, Cox and the Kanawha Division were transferred to the Army of Virginia.

Iron Brigade unit badge, a maltese cross design, showing the Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana, Union Army regiments, who were the core of the Brigade, on a historical marker, at Gettysburg National Military Park.

Iron Brigade

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Infantry brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War.

Infantry brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War.

Iron Brigade unit badge, a maltese cross design, showing the Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana, Union Army regiments, who were the core of the Brigade, on a historical marker, at Gettysburg National Military Park.
Union Army soldiers in the 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company I, of the Iron Brigade, in Virginia, 1862
Rufus King, the founder and original commander of the Wisconsin Iron Brigade
John Gibbon, the commander of the combined three-state Western Iron Brigade
The black wool hardee hat was most famously worn and easily identified as the hat worn by the Union Army's "Iron Brigade of the West", which became their trademark. They were popularly known by the nickname "The Black Hats".
Union Army soldiers, from the 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company C, of the Iron Brigade, wearing a mix of blue and gray uniforms and the distinctive hardee hats. The state militia uniforms were eventually replaced to avoid being mistaken as Confederate soldiers. From a rare, degraded, tintype photograph, circa 1861.
24th Michigan Monument, Gettysburg National Military Park
The Iron Brigade prepared for battle, at Gettysburg, by anchoring the Union Army's southern flank, 10:00&ndash;10:45 a.m., on Day 1.
Death of General John F. Reynolds as he supervised the deployment of the Iron Brigade early on the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg

On August 28, 1862, during the preliminary phases of the Second Battle of Bull Run, it stood up against attacks from a superior force under Maj. Gen Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson on the Brawner farm.