A report on Second Battle of Bull Run

Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

Fought August 28–30, 1862, in Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the American Civil War.

- Second Battle of Bull Run
Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

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Battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia

Confederate States Army

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The military land force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–1865), fighting against the United States forces in order to uphold the institution of slavery in the Southern states.

The military land force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–1865), fighting against the United States forces in order to uphold the institution of slavery in the Southern states.

Battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia
Private Edwin Francis Jemison, whose image became one of the most famous portraits of the young soldiers of the war
A cartoon from the war, showing the Confederates forcibly drafting a Unionist man into the Confederate army. The Unionist man objects, with the Confederates threatening to lynch him if he does not comply.
An 1861 Confederate recruiting poster from Virginia, urging men to join the Confederate cause and fight off the U.S. Army, which it refers to as a "brutal and desperate foe"
CSA M1857 Napoleon Artillery Piece
General Robert E. Lee, the Confederacy's most famous general
An 1895 illustration showing the uniforms of the Confederate Army contrasted with those of the U.S. Army
A painting of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia fighting the U.S. Army at Spotsylvania in 1864
A group of Confederate soldiers-possibly an artillery unit captured at Island No. 10 and taken at POW Camp Douglas (Chicago); photograph possibly by D. F. Brandon
Confederate troops marching south on N Market Street, Frederick, Maryland, during the Civil War
A Cherokee Confederates reunion in New Orleans, 1903
Jackson McCurtain, Lieutenant Colonel of the First Choctaw Battalion in Oklahoma, CSA
1862 illustration showing Confederates escorting kidnapped African American civilians south into slavery. A similar instance occurred in Pennsylvania when the Army of Northern Virginia invaded it in 1863 to fight the U.S. at Gettysburg.
An 1862 illustration of a Confederate officer forcing slaves at gunpoint to fire a cannon at U.S. soldiers in battle. A similar instance occurred at the first Battle of Bull Run, where slaves were forced by the Confederates to load and fire a cannon at U.S. forces.
An 1864 cartoon lampooning the Confederacy's deliberating on the use of black soldiers, showing them defecting en masse towards U.S. lines if such proposals were adopted.
"Marlboro", an African-American body servant to a white Confederate soldier
Julian Scott's 1873 painting, Surrender of a Confederate Soldier
Corporal of the Artillery division of the Confederate Army
Confederate mortar crew at Warrington, Florida in 1861, across from Fort Pickens
Confederate artillery at Charleston Harbor, 1863
Lt Col. E. V. Nash, 4th Georgia Infantry Doles-Cook Brigade, who was killed in 1864
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<Center>Colonel (Infantry shown)</Center>
<Center>Lieutenant-colonel (Headquarters shown)</Center>
<Center>Major (Medical Corps shown)</Center>
<Center>Captain (Marine Corps shown)</Center>
<Center>1st Lieutenant (Artillery shown)</Center>
<Center>2nd Lieutenant (Cavalry shown)</Center>

During the Civil War 28,693 Native Americans served in the U.S. and Confederate armies, participating in battles such as Pea Ridge, Second Manassas, Antietam, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and in Federal assaults on Petersburg.

John A. Koltes

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John Albert Koltes was an American colonel of German origin who commanded the 73rd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War before being killed at the Second Battle of Bull Run.

John Gibbon

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Career United States Army officer who fought in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars.

Career United States Army officer who fought in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars.

Gibbon (right), with his II corps commander Hancock (sitting) and fellow division commanders Barlow (left) and Birney (center standing) during the Wilderness campaign
Gibbon (far left) at Lee's surrender at Appomattox (Zoom)
Gibbon and Chief Joseph
John Gibbon's grave at Arlington National Cemetery

He led the brigade into action against the famous Confederate Stonewall Brigade at the Battle of Brawner's Farm, a prelude to the Second Battle of Bull Run.

Longstreet's troops march through the Gap

Battle of Thoroughfare Gap

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The Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, also known as Chapman's Mill, took place on August 28, 1862, in Fauquier County and Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

The Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, also known as Chapman's Mill, took place on August 28, 1862, in Fauquier County and Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

Longstreet's troops march through the Gap
Map of Thoroughfare Gap Battlefield core and study areas by the American Battlefield Protection Program

Confederate forces under Maj. Gen. James Longstreet successfully drove back Union forces under Brig. Gen. James B. Ricketts and Col. Percy Wyndham, allowing his corps to unite with that of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson prior to the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas).

Prince William County, Virginia

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Located on the Potomac River in the U.S. state of Virginia.

Located on the Potomac River in the U.S. state of Virginia.

The old county courthouse (c.1897) in March 2007
Prince William County Judicial Center
The National Museum of the Marine Corps in November 2010
The Manassas National Battlefield Park visitor center in July 2003
I-95 in Woodbridge
I-66 in Gainesville
Potomac Mills in August 2005

Manassas National Battlefield Park, located north of Manassas in Prince William County, preserves the site of two major American Civil War battles: the First Battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861, and the Second Battle of Manassas which was fought between August 28 and 30, 1862.

Portrait by Brady-Handy studio, c. 1865–1880

Nathaniel P. Banks

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American politician from Massachusetts and a Union general during the Civil War.

American politician from Massachusetts and a Union general during the Civil War.

Portrait by Brady-Handy studio, c. 1865–1880
Portrait by Brady-Handy studio, c. 1865–1880
Major General Nathaniel Prentiss Banks of General Staff U.S. Volunteers Infantry Regiment in uniform, with his wife, Mary Theodosia Palmer Banks. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Banks in 1852, portrait by Southworth and Hawes
John Albion Andrew (portrait by Darius Cobb) succeeded Banks as governor.
The champions of the Union, lithograph by Currier & Ives, 1861. Banks is among the frontmost standing figures, just left of the central seated figure, General Winfield Scott.
Banks' headquarters in Winchester, Virginia, during the Civil War
Banks in his military uniform, c. 1861 (portrait by Mathew Brady)
Colonel Short's Villa in New Orleans Garden District was the residence of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks, U.S. Commander, Department of the Gulf
1860s map showing the Siege of Port Hudson
Confederate General Richard Taylor opposed Banks in Louisiana.
General Edward Canby succeeded Banks in Louisiana.
Statue of Banks by Henry Hudson Kitson in Waltham, Massachusetts

During the Second Battle of Bull Run, Banks was stationed with his corps at Bristoe Station and did not participate in the battle.

Abner Doubleday

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Career United States Army officer and Union major general in the American Civil War.

Career United States Army officer and Union major general in the American Civil War.

Doubleday photo displayed at Fort Sumter National Monument in Charleston harbor
Fort Sumter Medal bearing the likeness of Major Robert Anderson which was presented to Abner Doubleday
Birthplace in Ballston Spa
Doubleday and his wife, Mary
Doubleday's tombstone in Arlington National Cemetery
Abner Doubleday monument in Ballston Spa

In the actions at Brawner's farm, just before the Second Battle of Bull Run, he took the initiative to send two of his regiments to reinforce Brigadier General John Gibbon's brigade against a larger Confederate force, fighting it to a standstill.

Evander M. Law

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Author, teacher, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

Author, teacher, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

Monument to Law in Bartow

In the Northern Virginia Campaign, at the Second Battle of Bull Run, Law and Hood were used again as the primary assaulting force in Longstreet's surprise attack against the Union left flank, almost destroying Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia.

Richard H. Anderson (general)

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Career U.S. Army officer, fighting with distinction in the Mexican–American War.

Career U.S. Army officer, fighting with distinction in the Mexican–American War.

Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, actions May 10, 1864
Confederate
Union

As part of Longstreet's corps, Anderson fought at Second Bull Run.

Daniel Butterfield

Daniel Butterfield

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New York businessman, a Union general in the American Civil War, and Assistant Treasurer of the United States.

New York businessman, a Union general in the American Civil War, and Assistant Treasurer of the United States.

Daniel Butterfield
Union General Daniel Butterfield
Medal of Honor(1896 version)

Butterfield continued in brigade command at the Second Battle of Bull Run and the Battle of Antietam, became division commander and then V Corps commander for the Battle of Fredericksburg.