Second Continental Congress

Continental CongressCongressSecond2nd Continental CongressConfederation CongressCongressionalContinental CongressmanMember, Continental Congressrebel Congresssecond Congress
The Second Continental Congress was a convention of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies that started meeting in the spring of 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.wikipedia
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United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceindependenceAmerican Declaration of Independence
It eventually adopted the Lee Resolution which established the new country on July 2, 1776, and it agreed to the United States Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.
The United States Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 4, 1776.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
It succeeded the First Continental Congress, which met in Philadelphia between September 5, 1774, and October 26, 1774.
Their appeal to the Crown had no effect, and so the Second Continental Congress was convened the following year to organize the defense of the colonies at the onset of the American Revolutionary War.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
The Second Continental Congress was a convention of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies that started meeting in the spring of 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
The Second Continental Congress, which also met in Philadelphia (in May 1775), drew up and signed the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, but when that city was captured by the British, the Continental Congress escaped westward, meeting at the Lancaster courthouse on Saturday, September 27, 1777, and then to York.

John Hancock

Governor HancockJohn Hancock IIIfirst signer
Notable new arrivals included Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and John Hancock of Massachusetts.
He served as president of the Second Continental Congress and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

President of the Continental Congress

PresidentPresident of CongressPresidents of the United States in Congress Assembled
Many of the 56 delegates who attended the first meeting were in attendance at the second, and the delegates appointed the same president (Peyton Randolph) and secretary (Charles Thomson).
The membership of the Second Continental Congress carried over without interruption to the First Congress of the Confederation, as did the office of president.

List of delegates to the Continental Congress

DelegateDelegate to the Continental CongressDelegates
Delegates from twelve of the Thirteen Colonies were present when the Second Continental Congress convened.
By the time the Second Continental Congress met in 1775, the shooting in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) had begun.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
Within two weeks, Randolph was summoned back to Virginia to preside over the House of Burgesses; he was replaced in the Virginia delegation by Thomas Jefferson, who arrived several weeks later.
At age 33, he was one of the youngest delegates to the Second Continental Congress beginning in 1775 at the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, where a formal declaration of independence from Britain was overwhelmingly favored.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican RevolutionAmerican War of Independence
The Second Continental Congress met on May 10, 1775 to plan further responses if the British government had not repealed or modified the acts; however, the American Revolutionary War had already started by that time with the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and the Congress was called upon to take charge of the war effort.
On July 2, 1776, the Second Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinentalsAmerican
On June 14, 1775, the Congress voted to create the Continental Army out of the militia units around Boston and appointed George Washington of Virginia as commanding general.
The Continental Army was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the ex-British colonies that became the United States of America.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
The Second Continental Congress was a convention of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies that started meeting in the spring of 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On July 6, 1775, Congress approved a Declaration of Causes outlining the rationale and necessity for taking up arms in the Thirteen Colonies.
During the Second Continental Congress, the remaining colony of Georgia sent delegates, as well.

Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms

Declaration of Causes
On July 6, 1775, Congress approved a Declaration of Causes outlining the rationale and necessity for taking up arms in the Thirteen Colonies.
The Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms was a document issued by the Second Continental Congress on July 6, 1775, to explain why the Thirteen Colonies had taken up arms in what had become the American Revolutionary War.

Benjamin Franklin

FranklinBen FranklinFranklin, Benjamin
Notable new arrivals included Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and John Hancock of Massachusetts.
The Pennsylvania Assembly unanimously chose Franklin as their delegate to the Second Continental Congress.

Henry Middleton

Henry Middleton was elected as president to replace Randolph, but he declined.
Middleton opposed declaring independence from Great Britain, and resigned from the Second Continental Congress in February 1776 when more radical delegates began pushing for independence.

Lee Resolution

resolution of independenceresolutiona resolution
It eventually adopted the Lee Resolution which established the new country on July 2, 1776, and it agreed to the United States Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Congress formally adopted the resolution of independence, but only after creating three overlapping committees to draft the Declaration, a Model Treaty, and the Articles of Confederation.
The Lee Resolution (also known as "The Resolution for Independence") was the formal assertion passed by the Second Continental Congress on July 2, 1776 which declared the establishment of a new country of United Colonies as independent from the British Empire, creating what became the United States of America.

Peyton Randolph

Many of the 56 delegates who attended the first meeting were in attendance at the second, and the delegates appointed the same president (Peyton Randolph) and secretary (Charles Thomson).
Fellow delegates elected him their president (Speaker) of both the First Continental Congress (which requested that King George III repeal the Coercive Acts) as well as Second Continental Congress (which extended the Olive Branch Petition as a final attempt at reconciliation).

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
On June 14, 1775, the Congress voted to create the Continental Army out of the militia units around Boston and appointed George Washington of Virginia as commanding general.
The Revolutionary War against Britain began in April 1775, with the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and a Patriot siege of the British in Boston, and the Second Continental Congress officially created the Continental Army the next month.

Richard Henry Lee

Richard LeeFrancis Lightfoot Lee IILee
On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee offered a resolution before the Congress declaring the colonies independent.
Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732 – June 19, 1794) was an American statesman from Virginia best known for the Lee Resolution, the motion in the Second Continental Congress calling for the colonies' independence from Great Britain.

Lyman Hall

Dr. Lyman Hall
On May 13, 1775, Lyman Hall was admitted as a delegate from the Parish of St. John's in the Colony of Georgia, not as a delegate from the colony itself.
Though Georgia was not initially represented in the First Continental Congress, through Hall's influence, the parish was persuaded to send a delegate – Hall himself – to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to the Second Continental Congress.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionArticles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.Confederation
Congress formally adopted the resolution of independence, but only after creating three overlapping committees to draft the Declaration, a Model Treaty, and the Articles of Confederation.
It was approved, after much debate (between July 1776 and November 1777), by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, and sent to the states for ratification.

John Adams

AdamsJohnJ. Adams
On May 15, they adopted a more radical preamble to this resolution, drafted by John Adams, which advised throwing off oaths of allegiance and suppressing the authority of the Crown in any colonial government that still derived its authority from the Crown.
A month later, Adams returned to Philadelphia for the Second Continental Congress as the leader of the Massachusetts delegation.

Henry Fite House

Henry Fite's tavernOld Congress Hall
Henry Fite's tavern was the largest building in Baltimore Town at the time and provided a comfortable location of sufficient size for Congress to meet.
The "Henry Fite House", located on West Baltimore Street (then known as Market Street), between South Sharp and North Liberty Streets (also later known as Hopkins Place), in Baltimore, Maryland, was the meeting site of the Second Continental Congress from December 20, 1776 until February 22, 1777.

Philadelphia campaign

British occupation of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiacampaign
Congress was again forced to flee Philadelphia at the end of September 1777, as British troops occupied the city; they moved to York, Pennsylvania and continued their work.
The Philadelphia campaign (1777–1778) was a British initiative in the American Revolutionary War to gain control of Philadelphia, which was then the seat of the Second Continental Congress.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The Second Continental Congress was a convention of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies that started meeting in the spring of 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Philadelphia played an instrumental role in the American Revolution as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 at the Second Continental Congress, and the Constitution at the Philadelphia Convention of 1787.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
Jefferson's proposal for a Senate to represent the states and a House to represent the people was rejected, but a similar proposal was adopted later in the United States Constitution.
It was drafted by the Second Continental Congress from mid-1776 through late 1777, and ratification by all 13 states was completed by early 1781.

Battles of Lexington and Concord

Battle of LexingtonLexington and ConcordLexington
The Second Continental Congress met on May 10, 1775 to plan further responses if the British government had not repealed or modified the acts; however, the American Revolutionary War had already started by that time with the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and the Congress was called upon to take charge of the war effort.
The Second Continental Congress adopted these men into the beginnings of the Continental Army.