Second Temple period

post-exilicSecond Templepost-Exilic periodSecondSecond Jewish Commonwealthperiod of the Second Temple Second Temple Judeafirst-century AD JudaismLate Second TemplePalestine in the first century CE
The Second Temple period in Jewish history lasted between 516 BCE and 70 CE, when the Second Temple of Jerusalem existed.wikipedia
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Second Temple

TempleHerod's TempleJewish Temple
The Second Temple period in Jewish history lasted between 516 BCE and 70 CE, when the Second Temple of Jerusalem existed.
The Second Temple (בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי, Beit HaMikdash HaSheni) was the Jewish holy temple which stood on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem during the Second Temple period, between 516 BCE and 70 CE.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem, IsraelAl-QudsQuds
The Second Temple period in Jewish history lasted between 516 BCE and 70 CE, when the Second Temple of Jerusalem existed.
The sobriquet of holy city (עיר הקודש, transliterated 'ir haqodesh) was probably attached to Jerusalem in post-exilic times.

Sadducees

SadduceeSaduceesSadducean
The sects of Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Zealots and early Christianity were formed during this period.
The Sadducees (Hebrew: צְדוּקִים Ṣĕdûqîm) were a sect or group of Jews that were active in Judea during the Second Temple period, starting from the second century BCE through the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE.

Essenes

EsseneBrotherhood of the EssenesEssenic
The sects of Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Zealots and early Christianity were formed during this period.
The Essenes (Modern Hebrew:, Isiyim; Greek: Ἐσσηνοί, Ἐσσαῖοι, or Ὀσσαῖοι, Essenoi, Essaioi, Ossaioi) were a Jewish sect during the Second Temple period that flourished from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE.

Second Temple Judaism

Second TempleSecond Temple periodJudaism
During this period, Second Temple Judaism can be seen as shaped by three major crises and their results, as various groups of Jews reacted to them differently.
The development of the Hebrew Bible canon, the synagogue, Jewish apocalyptic expectations for the future, and the rise of Christianity can all be traced to the Second Temple period.

Hellenistic Judaism

Hellenistic JewishHellenized JewsHellenistic Jews
539 – c. 332 BCE), then under the Greeks (c. The second crisis was the growing influence of Hellenism in Judaism, which culminated in the Maccabean Revolt of 167 BCE.
Both Early Christianity and Early Rabbinical Judaism were far less 'orthodox' and less theologically homogeneous than they are today; and both were significantly influenced by Hellenistic religion and borrowed allegories and concepts from Classical Hellenistic philosophy and the works of Greek-speaking Jewish authors of the end of the Second Temple period before the two schools of thought eventually affirmed their respective 'norms' and doctrines, notably by diverging increasingly on key issues such as the status of 'purity laws', the validity of Judeo-Christian messianic beliefs, and, more importantly, the use of Koiné Greek and Latin as liturgical languages replacing Biblical Hebrew ...etc.

Korban

sacrificessacrificekorbanot
The body of pilgrims, forming a band of 42,360, having completed the long and dreary journey of some four months, from the banks of the Euphrates to Jerusalem, were animated in all their proceedings by a strong religious impulse, and therefore one of their first concerns was to restore their ancient house of worship by rebuilding their destroyed Temple and reinstituting the sacrificial rituals known as the korbanot.
By the Second Temple period, Hellenistic Jewish texts use korban specifically to mean a vow.

Judaism

JewishJewsJudaic
A deterioration of relations between hellenized Jews and religious Jews led the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes to impose decrees banning certain Jewish religious rites and traditions.
Historically, all or part of this assertion was challenged by various groups such as the Sadducees and Hellenistic Judaism during the Second Temple period; the Karaites and Sabbateans during the early and later medieval period; and among segments of the modern non-Orthodox denominations.

Yehud Medinata

Persian periodPersianJudah
They flourished first under the Persians (c.
The restoration of the Davidic kingdom under Persian royal patronage was clearly the project of the exile community in the early post-Exilic period.

Babylonian captivity

Babylonian exileexileexile in Babylon
First came the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah in 587/6 BCE, when the Judeans lost their independence, monarchy, holy city and First Temple and were partly exiled to Babylon.
The Priestly source, one of the four main sources of the Torah/Pentateuch in the Bible, is primarily a product of the post-exilic period when the former Kingdom of Judah had become the Persian province of Yehud.

Jerusalem during the Second Temple Period

JerusalemPersian PeriodSecond Temple Period
The 600 years of the Second Temple period can be divided into several periods, each with its own distinct political and social characteristics.

History of ancient Israel and Judah

ancient IsraelIsraelbiblical times
The Second Temple period (520 BCE – 70 CE) differed in significant ways from what had gone before.

Syria Palaestina

PalestinePalaestinaRoman Palestine
It was created in 6 CE with the Census of Quirinius and merged into Syria Palaestina after 135 CE.
The development of the Hebrew Bible canon, the synagogue, Jewish apocalyptic expectations for the future, and Christianity, can all be traced to the Second Temple period.

Jewish history

Jewishhistory of Judaismhistory
The Second Temple period in Jewish history lasted between 516 BCE and 70 CE, when the Second Temple of Jerusalem existed.

Pharisees

PhariseePharisaicPharisaism
The sects of Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Zealots and early Christianity were formed during this period.

Zealots

ZealotZealotryzealous
The sects of Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Zealots and early Christianity were formed during this period.

Early Christianity

early Christianearly Churchearly Christians
The sects of Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Zealots and early Christianity were formed during this period.

First Jewish–Roman War

First Jewish-Roman WarGreat Jewish RevoltJewish Revolt
The Second Temple period ended with the First Jewish–Roman War and the Roman destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple.

Siege of Jerusalem (70 CE)

Siege of Jerusalemdestruction of Jerusalemdestruction of the Second Temple
The Second Temple period ended with the First Jewish–Roman War and the Roman destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple.

Nevi'im

Books of the ProphetsProphetsBook of the Prophets
After the death of the last Nevi'im (Jewish prophets) of antiquity and still under Persian rule, the leadership of the Jewish people was in the hands of five successive generations of zugot ("pairs of") leaders.

Zugot

duumviratesgreat Jewish sagespairs
After the death of the last Nevi'im (Jewish prophets) of antiquity and still under Persian rule, the leadership of the Jewish people was in the hands of five successive generations of zugot ("pairs of") leaders.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
During this period, Second Temple Judaism can be seen as shaped by three major crises and their results, as various groups of Jews reacted to them differently. After the death of the last Nevi'im (Jewish prophets) of antiquity and still under Persian rule, the leadership of the Jewish people was in the hands of five successive generations of zugot ("pairs of") leaders.

Siege of Jerusalem (587 BC)

siege of Jerusalemdestruction of Jerusalemfall of Jerusalem
First came the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah in 587/6 BCE, when the Judeans lost their independence, monarchy, holy city and First Temple and were partly exiled to Babylon.

Solomon's Temple

First TempleTemple of SolomonTemple
First came the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah in 587/6 BCE, when the Judeans lost their independence, monarchy, holy city and First Temple and were partly exiled to Babylon.

Maccabees

MaccabeanMaccabeeMaccabean Revolt
The second crisis was the growing influence of Hellenism in Judaism, which culminated in the Maccabean Revolt of 167 BCE.